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YEAR BOOK 

Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society 

OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

SIXTY-SIXTH 

ANNUAL 
REPORT 



C^ V UNiVER; 



NINETEEN THIRTY-FIVE 






ARY 



TT^r^ 

PERIODICALS 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY FRIEND 

MISS EFFIE A. MERRILL, Editor 

103 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. 

Subscription price, 60 cents for one year; one dollar for two years. 

JUNIOR MISSIONARY FRIEND 

MRS. JAMES H. LEWIS, Editor 
1930 Sheridan Road, Evanston, lU. 

Subscription price, single copies, 25 cents a year. Six copies 

addressed to one person, $1.00. Ten copies or more, 

addressed to one person, 15 cents each. 

FRAUEN MISSIONS FREUND 

MISS AMALIE M. AGHARD, Editor 
1119 La Boice Drive, Glendale, CaL 

Subscription price, 35 cents a year. 



Send all Subscriptions for Periodicals to 
ANNIE G. BAILEY, Publisher, 581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



ZENANA PAPERS 

RAFIQ-I-NISWAN rUrdu) ABLA HITKARAK (Hindi) 

STREEYANCHI MAITREEN (Marathi) 

MAHILA BANDHUB (Bengali) MATHAR MITHIRI (Tamil) 



YEAR BOOK 

V/omans Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church 



BEING THE SIXTY-SIXTH ANNUAL 
REPORT OF THE SOCIETY 




Organized 1869 
Incorporated 1884 



General Office: Room 710, 150 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Publication Office: 581 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 



THE OPEN BOOK 

The entrance of Thy Words giveth Tight 
Psalm 119 : 130 



HYMN 

"The Word of God Must Go." — Tune, Diademata, Methodist 
Hymnal, No. 179. 

The Word of God must go 
To waiting lands afar. 
Till every distant shore shall know 
The beauty of the star. 
The flag of God unfurled, 
Above all storms shall toss 
Until it signals down the world 
The meaning of the cross. 

Go, ye who bear the Word! 

We'll pray, and strive, and give 

Till hearts that love had never stirred 

Shall see the Light, and live. 

The Word of God must go 

To waiting lands afar. 

Till every distant shore shall know 

The beauty of the star. 

— Nancy Byrd Turner 

Copyright, 1927, by Presbyterian Board of Christian Education 
Used by permission 



PRAYER 

O God, our Father, we beseech thee for peace. . . . Bring to an 
end the present agony of conflict. Cause us to renounce the error 
of depending on brute force and militarism for ultimate solutions. 
That peace through love is the only way to ultimate victory, make 
this clear to our souls. . . . 

To Thee who answereth prayer miraculously, we give thanks 
already for the answer to this petition. Finding an inexpressible 
blessing in so doing, we affirm the faith that this prayer will eventu- 
ally be carried to realization. . . . Give us new energy, and enable 
each one of us to go forward, filled with heavenly power from on 
high. Through the Lord Jesus we ask it. Amen. 

— Toyohiko Kagaiva 



WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

of the 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



OFFICERS 



President 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, 812 Summit Avenue, Mt. Vernon, Iowa. 

Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, 45 Prospect St., Madison, N. J. 

Mrs. Charles L. Mead, 3939 Warwick Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 

V ice-Presidents-at-Large 

Mrs. Frederick F. Lindsay, 25 Seymour Ave., S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mrs. Francis J. McConnell, Room 710, 150 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Recording Secretary 
Mrs. H. E. Woolever, 3511 Rodman Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer 

Miss Florence Hooper, 30 Maryland Life Building, Baltimore, Md. 



FOREIGN DEPARTMENT 



Chairman 

Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf 

Secretary 

Mrs. Franklin Reed, 619 Carlton Road, Westfield, N. J. 

Member ex-ofificio 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, President 

Corresponding Secretaries 

Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell, 100 Washington St., Maiden, Mass. 

Mrs. Charles H. Hardie, 883 East Nineteenth St., I3rooklyn, N. Y. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Lee, 400 Shady Ave., E. E., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Miss Juliet H. Knox, Associate, 7320 Brighton Road, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Mrs. J. M. M. Gray, American University Campus, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. C. C. Peale, 869'Bryden Road, Columbus, Ohio. 

Mrs. Frank E. Baker, 719 Emerson St., Evanston, 111. 

Mrs. Otis Moore, Tipton, Iowa, R.F.D. No. 1. 

Mrs. Leon Roy Peel, 607 Wesley Temple Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Miss Ella M. Watson, 1701 S. Seventeenth St., Lincoln, Neb. 

Mrs. J. K. Cecil, 530 Kellogg Ave., Palo Alto, Calif. 

Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, 4857 N. E. 8th Ave., Portland, Oregon. 

Miss Florence Hooper, Treasurer. 



1 93475 



4 Officers and Committees 

HOME DEPARTMENT 

Chairman 

Mrs. Charles L. Mead 

Secretary 

Mrs. F. H. Sheets, 1930 Sheridan Road, Evanston, III. 

Member ex-officio 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, President 

Secretaries of the Home Base 

Mrs. Adolphus Linfield, 29 Everett St., Watertown, Mass. 

Mrs. Berryman H. McCoy, 19 Prospect St., Trenton, N. J. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Dievler, 7730 Union Ave., Elkins Park, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miss Lulie P. Hooper, 100 W. University Parkway, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. E. E. Gayer, 94 Wilson Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

Mrs. C. N. Timmons, 406 Fourth Ave., Sterling, 111. 

Mrs. J. D. Bragg, 3666A Montana St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. F. L. Parso, 1441 Fourth Ave., VVindom, Minn. 

Mrs. E. Guy Cutshall, 4926 Madison Ave., Lincoln, Neb. 

Mrs. Jerome Seymour, 952 No. Lake Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

Mrs. C. D. Fletcher, 156 So. University St., Blackfoot, Idaho. 



SPECIAL SECRETARIES 
Young People's Department — Mrs. Albert E. Beebe, 54 Elmwood PI., 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Junior Department — Mrs. Carl F. New, 518 Old Orchard Road, Ten Hills, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Student Worls — Mrs. H. M. LeSourd, 206 Waverly Ave., Newton, Mass. 
Wesleyan Service Guild — Mrs. Merle N. English, 729 Emerson St., 

Evanston, 111. 



THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1935 

The President, Vice-Presidents, Recording Secretary, Treasurer, Corre- 
sponding Secretaries, Secretaries of the Home Base, Secretary of the 
Foreign Department, Secretary of the Home Department, Delegates, 
Secretaries of the Young People's, Junior and Student Work and of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild. 
Delegates were excused from attendance in order to save expenses. 



EDITORS 
Woman's Missionary Friend 

Miss Effie A. Merrill, 103 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. 

Der Frauen Missions Freund 

Miss Amalie M. Achard, 1119 La Boice Drive, Glendale, Calif. 

Junior Missionary Friend 

Mrs. James H. Lewis, 1930 Sheridan Road, Evanston, 111. 
General Literature 

Miss Annie G. Bailey, 581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



Officers and Committees 

Executive Daily 

Mrs. F. T. Enderis, 1555 Ruth Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 



PUBLISHER 

Miss Annie G. Bailey, 581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



DIRECTOR OF LIBRARY SERVICE 

Miss Alice I. Hazeltine, 39 Claremont Ave., New York, N. Y. 



SECRETARY OF GENERAL OFFICE 

Miss Ruth Ransom, Room 710, 150 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 



General Counselor — Mr. Roszel C. Thomsen. 

Auditor of Accounts of the General Treasurer and of the Treasurer of 
Retirement Fund — Mr. Wilmer Black, Baltimore, Md. 



STANDING COMMITTEES FOR 1935-19361 
By-Laws 

Mrs. H. E. Woolever, Mrs. W. S. Mitchell, Miss Annie G. Bailey, Mrs. 

L. R. Peel, Mrs. Franklin Reed, Mrs. C. D. Fletcher. 
Consultation with the Board of Foreign Missions 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. C. L. Mead, Mrs. 

F. J. McConnell, Miss Florence Hooper, Mrs. F. F. Lindsay, Miss Ella 

M. Watson, Mrs. J. M. M. Gray, Mrs. C. C. Peale. 
General Office 

Mrs. C. H. Hardie, Mrs. H. E. Woolever, Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Mrs. 

Dorr Diefendorf, Miss Lulie P. Hooper, Mrs. Charles L. Mead, Mrs. 

Fred A. Victor. 
International Department 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Mrs. F. F. Lindsay, Mrs. C. L. Mead, Mrs. 

H. E. W'oolever, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Miss Juliet H. Knox, Miss Amalie 

M. Achard, Mrs. George H. Tomlinson, Mrs. Albert E. Beebe. 
Investments 

The General Officers and General Counselor. 
Nominations 

Mrs. C. N. Timmons, Mrs. W. S. Mitchell, Mrs. Wm. H. Dievler, Mrs. 

Otis Moore. Three delegates to be added at the session of the General 

Executive Committee in 1936. 
State of the Society 

Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Frank E. Baker, Mrs. F. L. 

Parso, Mrs. C. N. Timmons. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES* 
Library Service 

Mrs. Wm. H. Dievler, Mrs. C. H. Hardie, Mrs. B. H. McCoy, Mrs. S. J. 
Herben, Miss Florence Hooper, Miss Ruth Ransom. 
Museum in Tremont Street Church 

Mrs. A. Linfield, Miss Lulie P. Hooper, Miss A. G. Bailey. 
Curator of the Museum — Miss Clementina Butler. 

tNominated with exception of Committee on Nominations by Nominating Committee. 
•Nominated by Home Department. One member of Leadership Training Committee 
nominated by Foreign Department. 



6 Officers and Committees 

World Citizenship 

Mrs. Geo. H. Tomlinson, 2600 Orrington Ave., Evanston, 111., Mrs. U. S. 
Grant, Mrs. F. H. Sheets, Mrs. Herman Fabry, Mrs. O. R. Aspegren, 
Mrs. H. G. Tufty, Mrs. R. A. Page, Mrs. W. C. Hanson. Branch presi- 
dents as corresponding members. 

Leadership Training 

Mrs. Harry Earl Woolever, Mrs. C. H. Hardie, Mrs. A. E. Beebe, Mrs. 
C. F. New. 



SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS 

Editor Share Plan Letters 

Mrs. Harry R. Ferguson, 206 Wollaston Ave., Emsworth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Transportation Aides 

Miss Ruth Ransom, Room 710, 150 Fifth Ave., New York, Mrs. E. L. 
Anderson, 96 Carl St., San Francisco, Calif., Mrs. Clyde Collison, 1420 
Spruce St., Pasadena, Calif., Mrs. Samuel D. McKinstry, 3220 Lakewood 
Ave., Seattle, Wash. 



REPRESENTATIVES ON BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Advisory Member of the World Service Commission f 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson. 

Central Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild* 

Mrs. Merle N. English, Mrs. C. N. Timmons, Mrs. J. M. Avann, Mrs. 
F. E. Baker. 

Commission on Curriculum* 

Mrs. James H. Lewis. 

Joint Committee on Religious Education** 

Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf. 

Methodist Joint Committee on Korea, Mexico and Japan** 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Miss Florence Hooper, Mrs. J. M. Avann, Miss 
Juliet Knox, Mrs. W. S. Mitchell. 

Joint Commission with Woman's Home Missionary Societyf 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Mrs. C. L. Mead, Mrs. F. H. Sheets, Mrs. Otis 
Moore, Mrs. Albert E. Beebe. 

Missionary Education Movement* 

Mrs. A. E. Beebe, Mrs. C. F. New. 

Committee on Christian Higher Education in India** 

Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. Franklin Reed, Miss Ruth Ransom. 

Committee on United Study of Foreign Missions* 

Mrs. John C. Shover. 

Committee on Christian Literature for Women and Children in 
Mission Lands** — Miss Clementina Butler. 

tNominated by Nominating Committee. 
♦Nominated by Home Department. 
♦♦Nominated by Foreign Department. 



Officers and Committees 7 

Associated Boards for Christian Colleges in China** 

Representatives on Boards of Ginling College, West China Union Uni- 
versity, Shantung Christian University, Yenching College. 

Union College Committees** 

Ewha College — Mrs. J. M. Avann, Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Miss Florence 

Hooper. Alternate, Mrs. W. S. Mitchell. 
Ginling College — Miss Elizabeth R. Bender, Mrs. F. J. McConnell. 

Alternate, Mrs. Albert E. Beebe. 
Isabella Thoburn College—Miss Ella M. Watson, Mrs. Wm. Boyd, Mrs. 

C. H. Hardie, Mrs. H. E. Woolever, Miss Florence Hooper, Dr. 

George Briggs, Mr. Thomas S. Donohugh. Alternate, Mrs. F.A.Victor. 

Advisory members — Mrs. Ellis Phillips, Mr. Wm. Boyd. 
West China Union University — Mrs. Frank E. Baker. Alternate, Mrs. W. 

E. Scarrit. 
Woman's Christian College of Japan — Miss Florence Hooper, Mrs.Wm. S. 

Mitchell, Miss Margaret Forsythe. Alternate, Mrs. F. A. Victor. 
Women's Christian College of Madras — Miss Clementina Butler, Mrs. 

Walter A. Jessup. Alternate, Mrs. B. H. McCoy. 
St. Christopher' s Training College, Madras — Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Miss 

Clementina Butler. Alternate, Mrs. B. H. McCoy. 
Shantung Christian University — Mrs. J. K. Cecil, Mrs. Franklin Reed. 

Alternate, Mrs. Eric North. 
Vellore Medical College — Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Miss Clementina Butler. 

Alternate, Mrs. B. H. McCoy. 
Yenching College for Women — Mrs. J. K. Cecil, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf. 

Alternate, Miss Ruth Ransom. Board of Trustees — Mrs. J. M. Avann. 

Foochow Christian Union Hospital** — Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. J. M. 
M. Gray, Mrs. Frank E. Baker. Alternate, Mrs. FrankHorne. Trustee at 
Large — Dr. Lillian Martin Quimby. 

Permanent Committee of Mission Boards Working in the Philippine 
Islands**— Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. Frank E. 
Baker. Alternate, Mrs. F. A. Victor. 

Committee on Co-operation in Latin America** — Miss Elizabeth M. Lee, 
Miss Juliet Knox, Mrs. F. J. McConnell. Alternate, Miss Ruth Ransom. 

Rural Missions Co-operating Committee** — Mrs. Franklin Reed. 
Alternate, Mrs. F". A. Victor. 

Delegates to Foreign Missions Conference of North America* — With 
expenses from their budget^Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf. 
With expenses from general treasury — Mrs. J. K. Cecil and Mrs. \y. H. 
Dievler. Alternate, Mrs. C. L. Mead. Without expenses paid — Mrs. B. H. 
McCoy, Mrs. J. M. M. Gray, Mrs. J. C. Shover, Miss Ella M. Watson, 
Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Mrs. Carl F. New, Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Frank 
E. Baker, Mrs. Albert E. Beebe, Miss Edith Fredericks. 

Delegates to Conference on Cause and Cure of War* 

To be appointed by the World Citizenship Committee. 

tNominated by Nominating Committee. 
'Nominated by Home Department. 
**Nominated by Foreign Department. 



8 Officers and Committees 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT COMMITTEES 

Country Committees 

India, Burma, Africa 

Miss Watson, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Van Meter, Mrs. Hardie Secretary. 
China 

Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Cecil, Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Peel, Secretary. 
Multi- Country 

Mrs. Peale, Miss Lee, Mrs. Mitchell, Miss Knox, Secretary. 

College Committees 

Isabella Thoburn — Miss Watson, Miss Hooper, Mrs. Hardie, Mrs. Cecil, 

Mrs. Woolever, Secretary. 
Hwa Nan — Mrs. Peel, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Nicholson, Mrs. 

Diefendorf. 
Ewha — Mrs. Baker, Mrs. McConnell, Mrs. Peale. 
Kwassui — Mrs. Van Meter, Mrs. Reed, Miss Knox. 

Policy Committees 

Educational — Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Nicholson, 

Miss Hooper, Miss Lee. 
Medical — Miss Watson, Mrs. Peale, Mrs. Diefendorf, Mrs. Cecil, Mrs. 

Baker. 
Miscellaneous — Miss Knox, Mrs. Hardie, Mrs. Peel, Mrs. Van Meter, Mrs. 

Baker. 

Personnel Committees 

Candidate — Mrs. Diefendorf, Mrs. Peel, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Moore, 

Mrs. Reed, Mrs. LeSourd. 
Nominations — (Deparment) Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Peale, Mrs. Van Meter. 
Scholarships and Fellowships — Mrs. Hardie, Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Nicholson, 

Miss Lee, Miss Knox, Miss Watson, Mrs. Moore. 



HOME DEPARTMENT COMMITTEES 

Forward Movement 

The Home Department and Mrs. Townsend and Mrs. Lindsay. 

Group L 
Student Work 

Mrs. Cutshall, Mrs. LeSourd, Mrs. McCoy, Miss L. Hooper, Mrs. Gaver. 
Wesleyan Service Guild 

Mrs. Dievler, Mrs. English, Mrs. Seymour, Miss Bailey, Mrs. Tomlinson. 
Young People's Work 

Mrs. Timmons, Mrs. Beebe, Mrs. Fletcher, Mrs. Bragg, Miss Merrill. 
Junior Work 

Mrs. Parso, Mrs. New, Mrs. Linfield, Mrs. Lewis. 

Group H. 
Literature 

Mrs. Bragg, Mrs. Dievler, Miss L. Hooper, Mrs. Fletcher, Mrs. Beebe, 

Mrs. New, Miss Bailey, Miss Merrill, Mrs. Lewis. 
Stewardship 

Mrs. Gaver, Mrs. Linfield, Mrs. Timmons, Mrs. English, Mrs. Cutshall. 
Extension 

Mrs. Seymour, Mrs. LeSourd, Mrs. McCoy, Mrs. Parso, Mrs. Sheets, 

Secretary. 



Field Correspondents and Treasurers 9 

Group III. 
Negro Work 

Miss L. Hooper, Mrs. Bragg, Mrs. Gaver, Mrs. Cutshall. 
Budget 

Mrs. Fletcher, Mrs. Sheets, Mrs. Parso, Mrs. Timmons, Mrs. English, 

Mrs. Lewis. 
Bi-lingual Work 

Mrs. Lindsay, Mrs. Seymour, Miss Merrill. 
World Citizenship 

Mrs. Bragg, Mrs. Tomlinson, Miss L. Hooper, Mrs. Gaver, Mrs. Cutshall. 
Interdenominational Interests 

Mrs. Linfield, Mrs. McCoy, Mrs. LeSourd, Mrs. Dievler, Mrs. Beebe, 

Miss Bailey, Mrs. New. 
Circle of Remembrance 

Miss Merrill, Mrs. Seymour. 



OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENTS, FIELD CORRESPONDENTS AND 
TREASURERS IN FOREIGN FIELDS 

AFRICA 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Charles H. Hardie. 

Angola 

Field Correspondent — Ingle Johnson, Quessua Girls School, Malange, Angola, 

Africa. 
Field Treasurer — Ingle Johnson, Quessua Girls School, Malange, Angola, Africa. 

Rhodesia 

Field Correspondent — Frances Quinton, Fairfield Girls School, Old Umtali, 

South Rhodesia, Africa. 
Field Treasurer — Mildred Benson, Fairfield Girls School, Old Umtali, South 

Rhodesia, Africa. 

Southeast Africa 
Field Correspondent — Bess L. Phillips, Inhambane, P. E., East Africa. 
Field Treasurer — Bess L. Phillips, Inhambane, P. E., East Africa. 

BURMA 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Otis Moore. 

Field Correspondent — Grace Stockwell, Thongwa, Burma. 

Field Treasurer — Hazel Winslow, Rangoon, Burma. 

CHINA 

Field Treasurer for all Conferences — Ruth Danner, 23 Yuen Ming Yuen, 
Shanghai. 

Central China 
Official Correspondent — Mrs. Leon Roy Peel. 
Field Correspondent — Cora L. Rahe, Wuhu, Anhwei. 

West China 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. F. E. Baker. 

Field Correspondent — Gladys B. Harger, Chungking, Szechwan, West China 

Foochow 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. J. M. M. Gray. 

Field Correspondent — Carrie M. Bartlett, Haitang Island, via Foochow. 

Hinghwa 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. J. M. M. Gray. 

Field Correspondent — Sylvia E. Aldrich, Hinghwa, via Foochow. 



10 Field Correspondents and Treasurers 

Kiangsi 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Leon Roy Peel. 
Field Correspondent — Annie M. Pittman, Kiukiang. 

North China 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. J. K. Cecil. 

Field Correspondent — Myra A. Jaquet, Tientsin. 

Shantung 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. J. K. Cecil. 

Field Correspondent — Mollie Townsend, Tsinanfu. 

Yenping 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. J. M. M. Gray. 

Field Correspondent^ — Gusta A. Robinett, Yenping, Fukien. 

Hwa Nan College 

Official Correspondent- — Mrs. Leon Roy Peel. 
Secretary of the Board of Directors — E. Pearce Hayes. 

INDIA 

Field Treasurer for all Conferences and for Isabella Thoburn College — Miss 
Ethel Whiting, 151 Dharamtala St., Calcutta, India. 

Bengal 

Official Correspondent— Mrs. C. H. Hardie. 
Field Correspondent^ — Ruth Field, Darjeeling. 

Bombay 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Otis Moore. 
Field Correspondent — May Sutherland, Nagpur. 

Central Provinces 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Otis Moore. 
Field Correspondent — Ethel Ruggles, Raipur. 

Gujarat 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. C. H. Van Meter. 

Field Correspondent — To be elected at conference in November, 

Hyderabad 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. C. H. Van Meter. 

Field Correspondent^ — Margaret Morgan, Hyderabad, Deccan. 

Indus River 

Official Correspondent — Miss Ella M. Watson. 
Field Correspondent — Caroline C. Nelson, Ajmer. 

Lucknow 

Official Correspondent— Miss Ella M. Watson. 
Field Correspondent- — Maren Tirsgaard, Arrah. 

North India 

Official Correspondent — Miss Ella M. Watson. 
Field Correspondent — Ruth Hoath, Budaun. 

Northwest India 

Official Correspondent — Miss Ella M. Watson. 

Field Correspondent — Gertrude E. Richards, Bulandshahr. 

South India 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. C. H. Van Meter. 
Field Correspondent — Urdell Montgomery, Bangalore. 



Field Correspondents and Treasurers 11 

JAPAN 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell. 
Field Treasurer — N. Margaret Daniel, Tokyo. 
Field Correspondent — Anna Laura White, Nagasaki. 

KOREA 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell. 
Field Correspondent — Mrs. Anna B. Chaffin, Seoul. 
Field Treasurer — Mr. G. C. Speidel, Seoul. 

MALAYA 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. C. C. Peale. 

Field Correspondent — Mabel C. Marsh, Penang, Malaya. 

Field Treasurer — Thirza Bunce, Ipoh, Malaya. 

SUMATRA 

Official Correspondent— Mrs. C. C. Peale. 

Field Correspondent^ — Mrs. Lydia Oelschlager Aim, Medan, Sumatra. 

Field Treasurer — June Redinger, Medan, Sumatra, Dutch East Indies. 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Official Correspondent — Mrs. C. C. Peale. 

Field Correspondent — Marguerite M. Decker, Manila. 

Field Treasurer — Mary Deam, Mary J. Johnston Hospital, Manila, P. I. 

EUROPE AND NORTH AFRICA 

Official Correspondent- — Miss Juliet Knox. 

Bulgaria 
Field Correspondent — Mellony Turner, Lovetch. 
Field Treasurer — Etta M. Gilford, Lovetch. 

Italy 
Field Correspondent and Treasurer — Artele B. Ruese, Via Savoia 15, Rome(34), 

North Africa 
Field Correspondent — Martha Robinson, I! Maten, Kabylia, Africa. 
Field Treasurer — Glora M. Wysner, Les Aiglons, El Biar, Algiers. 

LATIN AMERICA 

Official Correspondent, Mexico — Miss Juliet H. Knox. 

Official Correspondent, South America — Miss Carrie J. Carnahan. 

Mexico 
Field Correspondent— Mary N. Pearson, 3a Serapio Rendon 76, Mexico, D.F., 

Mexico. 
Field Treasurer — Elsie Shepherd, Pachuca, Hidalgo. 

Eastern South America 

Field Correspondent for Argentine — Olive L Given, 1352 Avenida Pellegrini, 

Rosario, Argentina. 
Field Treasurer for Argentine — Olive L Given, 1352 Avenida Pellegrini, 

Rosario, Argentina. 
Field Correspondent for Uruguay — Ruth C. Wilson, 2709, 8 de Octubre, 

Montevideo, Uruguay. 
Field Treasurer for Uruguay — Jennie Reid, Instituto Crandon, 2709, 8 de 

Octubre, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

North Andes 

Field Correspondent — Treva B. Overholt, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru. 
Field Treasurer — C. Frances Vandegrift, Apartado 2144, Lima, Peru. 



Pp Beati) to ILitt immortal 

Josephine Stahl, India 1892-1934 

Amy G. Lewis, Japan and general office 1898-1934 

Alice Means, India 1897-1935 

Katherine a. Blair, India 1888-1935 

Bessie E. Rigg, India 1925-1935 

Mrs. Frank M. KcKibben, general secretary of junior work. . . . 1932-1935 



PROCEEDINGS 
General Executive Committee 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
Methodist Episcopal Church 



Sixty-sixth Annual Session 

October 23 and October 25, 1935 



Wednesday, October 23 

The General Executive Committee was called to order by Mrs. Thomas 
Nicholson, president, at 11 a.m. The purpose of the meeting was stated. It 
was necessary to secure immediate action by the General Executive Committee 
on two matters which aflfected the work of the Board of Foreign Missions and 
concerning which the decision of the General Executive Committee needed to 
be transmitted to the Policy Committee of the Board, which was adjourning its 
meeting at noon this day. These two matters concerned the future policy of 
the Board and Society in Sumatra and Malaya and the medical work in China 
Both matters had been considered in both Departments. The Foreign Depart- 
ment had taken action and this action was now brought to the General Execu- 
tive Committee for confirmation. 

It was voted that the telegram concerning the work in Sumatra and 
Malaya, as presented by the Foreign Department, be approved.* 

It was voted that the telegram concerning medical work in China, as 
presented by the Foreign Department, be approved.* 

It was voted that the Foreign Department be empowered to act to con- 
clude necessary details involved in putting into effect the programs as outlined 
in the telegrams. 

It was voted that the Home Department minutes of the mid-year meeting 
be accepted and actions confirmed without reading. (All members of the unit 
meeting had a copy of these minutes.) 

Mrs. Sheets presented the minutes of the ad interim actions of the Home 
Department. They were accepted and the actions confirmed. 

It was voted that Mrs. Nicholson be requested to present the report of the 
Society at the meeting of the Board of Foreign Missions in November. 

The minutes of the consulting committee were read and accepted with 
necessary changes. 

Mrs. Mead asked for the privilege of the floor and brought greetings from 
Bishop Mead in whose area the General Executive Committee was meeting. 
Mrs. Nicholson expressed the appreciation of the General Executive Committee. 
The secretary read the ad interim actions of the general officers and these were 
confirmed. 

It was voted that the Society hold an anniversary program at the coming 
General Conference; 

* See actions of the Foreign Department. 

13 



14 Pj'oceedings 

That we request an afternoon in the first week, preferably Thursday, for 
the anniversary; 

That the program be left in the hands of the General Officers with privilege 
of co-opting other members. 

The ad interim minutes of the Foreign Department were read by Mrs. 
Reed. They were approved and the actions confirmed. 

The minutes of the investment committee were read, approved, and 
actions confirmed. 

Adjournment. 

Friday, October 25 

The General Executive Committee was called to order at 10 a.m., Mrs. 
Nicholson presiding. Mr. Fahs led the worship service. 

The minutes of the previous meeting of the General Executive Committee 
were read and approved. 

Minutes of the Foreign Department were read and actions were confirmed* 

The minutes of the Hwa Nan Board of Trustees were read and actions 
were confirmed.* 

The minutes of the Home Department were read and actions were con- 
firmed with one exception. The amount to be contributed for the joint exhibit 
with the Board of Foreign Missions at the General Conference was changed 
from .$200. to $300.** 

The minutes of the unit meeting at mid-year were approved and actions 
confirmed. The minutes of the unit meetings held during the present session 
of the General Executive Committee meeting, with the exception of the 
actions taken, were referred to a committee consisting of Mrs. Diefendorf 
and Mrs. Mead for approval. The actions adopted by the unit meeting were 
confirmed.*** 

It was voted that the Society employ Mr. Charles H. Fahs for seven 
months, in addition to the original contract, as research adviser, his salary to 
be $200.00 per month. 

Mrs. Tomlinson reported the world citizenship committee. It was voted 
that the report be accepted and that a statement prepared by the committee, 
to be included in a letter sent to the auxiliaries, be approved. The statement 
recorded the attitude of the Society toward measures for peace, temperance, 
and better movies. 

The committee on memorials consisting of Mrs. Seymour and Mrs. Hardie, 
reported a memorial sent to the General Executive Committee by New England 
Branch. It was referred to the committee on memorials, with Mrs. Tomlinson 
co-opted, for a slight rewording and as brought in by the committee was 
adopted as follows: 

Whereas: We realize that the General Conference of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church has from time to time given utterance to its convictions concerning 
matters of national and international import; and 

*See actions of the Foreign Department. 
'*See actions of the Home Department. 
***See actions of the Unit Meeting. 



Proceedings 15 

Whereas: The resolution adopted by the General Conference of 1932, 
paragraph 562, has been disregarded and young men of the Methodist Church 
have had to forego securing their education at the university of their choice 
because of the compulsory military training required and to which, having 
conscientious scruples, they could not accede; and 

Whereas: We are impressed with the widespread desire manifest at this 
time to discover a plan for national conduct which shall eliminate the menace 
of war; and 

Whereas: We are impressed especially with the desire of the youth of the 
land to outlaw war, as evidenced by their peace meetings and educational pro- 
grams in high schools, colleges, and churches; and 

Whereas: We note that in some of the non-Christian lands there are 
organizations for the bringing about of "peace" among the nations; and that 
■"they co-operate" with the Christian peace groups "when a definite task is to 
be accomplished for the common cause ;"t and 

Whereas: We look with joy at the progress which has been made through 
the centuries and we believe that never before have there been so many people 
who are obeying the commands, "Thou shalt not kill" and "Thou shalt love 
thy neighbor as thyself;" and 

Whereas: The patriotism of the Methodist Episcopal Church has never 
been challenged, and we — wives, mothers, daughters, and sisters, wish at this 
time to re-affirm our love of country and our loyalty to her; yet we belive we 
should crystallize our wish for peace into a determined will to secure peace; and 

Whereas: We believe that the Methodist Episcopal Church has now a 
magnificent opportunity to serve not only the youth of today, but to an even 
greater degree the generations to come; 

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the General Conference of 1936 of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
be memorialized to take such action as shall place on record the fact that the 
Methodist Episcopal Church as an organization and many of its members as 
individuals conscientiously object to war and to compulsory military training 
in schools and colleges; and wish to be so known and acknowledged by the 
government and by the world, as is the Society of Friends. 

Be it further resolved: 

That a copy of this action be sent to the President of the United States of 
America and to every member of his Cabinet; to the United States Senate and 
to the House of Representatives; and to each United States Senator and Repre- 
sentative, individually; that as soon as possible the influence of this action of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church may spread and begin to bear fruit, and others 
join, until the day shall come when to be a Christian shall mean in deed and in 
truth one who bears not arms against his brother. 

It was voted that the reports of the recording secretary, treasurer, 3'oung 
people's secretary, secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, student secretary, 
editors, publisher, and chairman of the committee on Christian Literature for 
fFrom "Japanese Women Speak" — Michi Kawai, Page 175. 



16 Proceedings 

Women and Children in Mission Lands, as previously given in the public 
session or before the unit meeting, be approved. 

The report of the auditor was presented and accepted. 

Adjournment. 

1.30 p.m. 

Further minutes of the Home Department were read and actions con- 
firmed.** 

A telegram from Miss Lulie P. Hooper, who was detained from attendance 
by illness, was read. 

Miss Ransom read a communication from Mr. Moss concerning the num- 
ber of representatives allowed the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society in the 
Foreign Missions Conference which is to meet January 8-10 in Asbury Park. 
The number was increased to thirteen. It was voted that the interdenomina- 
tional committee be excused to bring in further nominations to complete the 
number of delegates. Upon their return they nominated Mrs. F. J. McConnell, 
Mrs. Carl F. New, Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Frank E. Baker, Mrs. Albert E. 
Beebe, Miss Edith Fredericks in addition to the names nominated by the 
Home Department. It was voted that these nominees be elected. 

Further minutes of the Home Department were read by Mrs. Sheets. It 
was voted that the matter of bringing special guests to the General Executive 
Committee be referred again to the Home Department and reported upon at 
the mid-year meeting. With this change the minutes were approved and 
actions confirmed.** 

The beautiful Chinese banner (one of the gifts sent to the Society at its 
sixtieth anniversary) to be presented to Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer because of her 
generous gifts to the Society, was displayed. 

The report of the by-law committee was given. With a slight modification 
which was left to the committee to word, the report was accepted.* It was 
voted that a letter be written by the secretary to Mrs. George A. Wilson 
thanking her for her efficient work in helping to define the duties of committees 
and in suggesting needed changes in the by-laws. 

Voted that the recommendation of the leadership training committee as 
follows be adopted: 

That missionaries on furlough be furnished Mrs. Mean's article "Writing 
for Missionary Publicity", in the June and July, 1934, issues of the Friend and 
with New York Branch "Manual for Speakers." 

Mrs. Nicholson and Mrs. Woolever brought the report of the committee on 
International Department. The recommendations of the committee were 
adopted :tt 

The committee on defining the duties of committees recommended that 
the report be left until the mid-year meeting, that in the meantime copies of 
the report be sent to each member of the Foreign and Home Departments. 
This was voted. 

Mrs. Timmons, for Northwestern Branch, invited the General Executive 

*.See report of committee on by-laws. 
**See report of Home Department. 
ttSee report of International Department. 



Proceedings 17 

Committee to meet at Muncie, Indiana, in 1936. Voted that the invitation be 
accepted with thanks. 

Mr. Fahs was called upon to review the history of the efforts to work out 
with the Board of Foreign Missions a joint policy in regard to Sumatra and 
Malaya and the telegram received from Dr. Diffendorfer in replj' to the one 
sent on October 23 was read.* 

It was voted that a committee on General Conference legislation as 
affecting the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society be appointed consisting of 
the treasurer and one member from each Department. Mrs. Timmons from 
the Home Department and Mrs. Cecil from the Foreign Department were 
named. 

It was voted that looking toward Unification there be a committee on 
woman's work to consider with committees from the other Branches of Metho- 
dism a future policy, Mrs. Nicholson to be chairman of the committee and to 
name the other members. She nominated Mrs. Lindsay, Mrs. McConnell, Mrs. 
Bragg, and Miss Lee. These names were approved. 

It was voted that $500.00 be appropriated as the share of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society for the work of the Joint Committee on Religious 
Education. 

The date of the opening of the mid-year meeting was announced as April 
29, at Columbus, Ohio. 

It was voted that following the appropriation service and the election of 
officers, Mrs. Peel and Miss Knox report their trips to their official fields. 

The secretary called the roll of the Branches and the appropriations for 
1936, with additional items by the treasurer, were made and approved as 
follows: 

New England $ 55,000.00 

New York 185,000.00 

Philadelphia 155,000.00 

Baltimore 40,000.00 

Cincinnati 180,000.00 

Northwestern 275,000.00 

DesMoines 85,000.00 

Minneapolis 47,500.00 

Topeka 130,000.00 

Pacific 90,000.00 

Columbia River 33,000.00 

Appropriation by Branches $1,275,500.00 

Retirement Allowances 46,000.00 

Zenana Papers 1,100.00 

Student Aid 850.00 

Isabella Thoburn College Endowment Income, . 670.00 

Total Appropriation $1,324,120.00 

Mrs. Nicholson read a few verses concerning the "River of the Water of 
Life" and brief prayers were offered. 
*See actions of the Foreign Department. 



18 Proceedings 

Election of ofificers followed. Mrs. Dievler and Miss Knox were appointed 
as tellers and the ballots were distributed. The general officers were all re- 
elected as follows: Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, president; Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf 
and Mrs. Charles L. Mead, vice-presidents; Mrs. F. F. Lindsay and Mrs, 
Francis J. McConnell, vice-presidents-at-large; Mrs. H. E. Woolever, recording 
secretary; Miss Florence Hooper, treasurer. Mrs. Cecil read the report of the 
nominating committee. It was accepted and those named were duly elected. 
(See page 5.) 

Mrs. Peel and Miss Knox then told of their visits to their official fields. 

Voted that Mrs. Diefendorf and Mrs. Mead approve minutes of the 
General Executive Committee meeting of October 25. 

Adjournment. 

Eloise Andrews Woolever, Recording Secretary. 



IN LANDS AFAR 

AFRICA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see '^Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

Angola Conference 

QuESSUA — Boarding School — Cilicia L. Cross, Violet B. Crandall*, Zella M . 
Glidden, Ingle A. Johnson, Alpha J. Miller, Marie Nelson.* 

Rhodesia Conference 

Old Umtali — Boarding School — Mildred O. Benson, Jessie A. PfaflF*, Frances 
Quinton, Ila M. Scovill. Medical — Irene P. Gugin, R.N. 

MuTAMBARA — Boarding School — Bertha E. Ramsay, Lulu L. Tubbs. Medical 
— Ona M. Parmenter, R.N., Oril A. Penney, R.N. 

Nyadiri — Boarding School — Grace Clark, Wilhelmina T. Shields. Medical 
—Alice E. Whitney, R.N. 

Umtali — Hostel — Sarah N. King, Beulah H. Reitz.* 

Southeast Africa Conference 

GlKUKi (Inhambane) — Boarding School — Mabel P. Michel, Ruth E. North- 
cott, Bess L. Phillips. Medical — Victoria Lang, R.N. Evangelistic Work — 
Ruth F. Thomas. 

AFRICA 

Viewing our work in Negro Africa as a whole, the outstanding items of 
the last four years may be said to be : increased self-support through improved 
and extended agricultural and industrial work done by the girls themselves 
and through the increasing interest of the parents; the valuable services 
rendered through the British and American Interdenominational Committee 
for Christian Literature in Africa, which has promoted the magazine "Listen" 
edited by Miss Margaret Wrong; and a growing desire for closer interdenomina- 
tional co-operation. The visit of Dr. John R. Mott to Africa in 1934 did much 
to promote this feeling. Several of our missionaries were privileged to attend 
his conferences. The objectives of Dr. Mott's visit may be briefly summarized 
as follows: 

L To take counsel with the leaders of the churches, Government, and 
other constructive forces of the country as to the most important 
and pressing problems, and as to how the Christian agencies can best 
help in meeting the present urgent and dangerous situation near and far. 

2. To renew contacts with the Students Christian Association of South 
Africa. 

3. To share knowledge and contacts. 

4. To collaborate in a fresh study of how best to foster united thinking, 

planning, and action in furthering the world mission of Christianity. 

Our work has gone forward without drastic change in the three conferences 
where the Society has its stations. In Angola, Portuguese territory, the Girls 
Boarding School at Quessua has reached an attendance of two hundred fifty 
girls. Miss Cross testifies that in her twenty years there, she has never known 
the girls to be better behaved, more obedient, do their work so well and be more 

*On furlough. 

19 



20 hi Lands J far 

anxious to be true Christians, than now. The Government Inspector of Schools 
commended the high quality of work being done. Two of the girls are assisting 
at the hospital, three are in training at the Bible school, and ten are pupil 
teachers. Revival meetings with wholesome and lasting effects were held last 
year. 

In June, 1934, the Conference of Angola Protestant Missions was held at 
Quessua, with English, Canadian and American Missions represented. The 
most important features were the movement to form a Protestant Alliance 
in the colony, and the visits of Senior Moreira, a minister from Portugal, and 
Mr. Hopkins of the World Sunday School Association. 

The question of sending negro missionaries to Angola has again been 
raised, and recommendation made by our Committee on Consultation with 
the Board of Foreign Missions, that we look favorably upon such procedure, 
should the way open. 

A much-needed new recruit. Miss Zella M. Glidden, sailed for Angola in 
the summer of 1935. 

In Rhodesia (British territory) our school work is coeducational. 

Mutambara had an electric lighting system installed about a year ago, 
another instance of the close co-operation in our African field between the 
Board and our Society, since the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society mis- 
sionaries furnished the money from their savings on the field, while the Board 
of Foreign Missions missionaries installed the plant. The Ford car is useful 
on the district, though donkeys are still needed in places where roads are as 
yet unimproved. This kraal work is advancing, with schools in their little pole 
and mud buildings opening daily at 7 :30 a.m., and Sunday services in the native 
churches, erected largely by the people themselves. The Government is 
anxious to have religious work stressed in the schools. The Bible has first place 
on the school program. With the exception of three special training schools, 
the Government does all of its educational work in connection with the Missions. 

The death of old Chief Mutambara in November, 1933, marked the transi- 
tion, in a sense, from dark "heathen" Africa in Rhodesia, and showed the 
amazing contrast of conditions under a Christian regime. 

At Nyadiri the "cut" has made it necessary to reduce the number of girls 
in the school, but to a marked degree, co-operation and self-help have been 
practiced to make resources stretch as far as possible. Sixty-five girls remained 
at the school last year during vacation, and sewed, threshed hemp, and rebuilt 
the wagon house and practice house with grass and poles. 

At Old Umtali, our largest station in Rhodesia, Fairfield Girls School 
recently graduated a class of eleven fine young girls, prepared for teaching. A 
village Teachers Institute, with sixty in attendance, proved helpful last year. 
School and church services had to be omitted for several weeks in the fall of 
1934, when an outbreak of diphtheria put them in quarantine. The baby 
fold passed through sad days earlier in the year with a scourge of influenza. 

The hostel at Umtali has been kept open through the re-allocation of 
some of the upkeep funds. Providing a shelter for negro girls and women in a 
city full of difficulties and temptations, the hostel offers a diversified social 
service program. 

In Portuguese Southeast Africa, Hartzell Girls School at Gikuki is our 
only Woman's Foreign Missionary Society station. With more than one 
hundred boarding and about seventy-five day pupils filling the school to over- 
flowing, and a severe famine in the land, all phases of work have nevertheless 
gone forward. The girls readily sacrified a meal a day, rather than have the 
school year cut short. Day pupils now pay tuition, and boarders furnish their 
own blankets (their only bedding). A small three-room house of native material 
has been built, and eight groups of girls take turns living there to get practice in 
home-making. 

More extensive work through a district has been made possible by the new 



Burma 21 

motor-car, and evangelistic meetings and an institute have been held in co- 
operation with the Board of Foreign Missions missionaries. 

The Nurses Training Class continues to send forth groups of consecrated 
young women, and textbooks for their use, a crying need, have been translated 
for this spring's class. Health talks have been given to a group of Indians, 
Mohammedans, who have settled in this region. 

Mrs. Chas. H. HARJiiE, Official Correspondent. 



BURMA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October 

Kalaw — Kings-wood School — Lela L. Kintner, Roxanna Mellinger. 

Rangoon — English Girls High School — -Mabel J. Reid. Burmese Girls High 
School — Elsie M. Power, M. Gladys Moore*. Chinese School and Evan- 
gelistic Work — Hazel Winslow, Julia Christenson. Burmese Evangelistic 
Work, Rangoon and Twante — Stella Ebersole. 

Thongwa — Evangelistic Work — Grace L. Stockwell. Anglo-Vernacular School 
— Maurine E. Cavett. 

Pegu — Evangelistic Work — Amanda Mitzner. 



Burma Conference 

Our work in Burma is divided on national lines — English, the first histor- 
ically, Chinese and Burmese. 

We have two large English schools, one in Rangoon and one in Kalaw, 
nearly 300 miles north, in the hills. The English Girls High School has an 
enrollment of 425, of whom forty-two are in the hostel. The school is entirely 
self-supporting, having this year even turned over its one missionary's salary 
to the reserve fund. In the high school final class, five girls sat for the govern- 
ment examinations, and all passed, with grades high enough to admit them 
to the university, where standards are constantly being raised. With the 
co-operation of the Burma Book Club and the Baptist Mission Press, the 
school put on Book Week, with books for sale and for inspection. Two girls 
earned prizes in the health essay competition sponsored by the Red Cross. 
Prizes, in fact, are quite a common occurrence in this school. Throughout 
the school the Charterhouse Course of religious education is used, and there 
is a stable religious life in teaching staff and students. A new course in home 
economics is planned for the immediate future, and if a teacher can be secured 
from America her salary could be paid on the field. A great opportunity for 
some fine American girl! 

At Kalaw is Kingswood School, formerly at Thandaung, the successor 
to the first orphanage established only ten years after Methodist work had 
begun in Burma. When the school was moved to Kingswood, only one building 
was erected, though it was seen that it would not be long before a place would 
be needed for an assembly hall and day school rooms. That time has arrived. 
The cornerstone of the new building was laid in March, and it is in use this 
school year. It is a brick building, measuring 200 by 50 feet, and contains, 
in the lower story, an office, one class room, and an assembly hall and stage 
and on the upper floor three class rooms, and a science room. The whole 

'On furlough. 



22 In Lands Ajar 

has been paid for on the field. The addition to the plant will be a substantial 
help in carrying out the aims of the school, to offer young people an education 
along sound lines, with physical development, a religion which consists of a 
simple faith in Christ, and a conviction that all work is honorable. 

The Chinese work — there are 65,000 Chinese in Rangoon — has been 
greatly stimulated by the visit to China of both missionaries. Each was able 
to arrange her furlough so as to make it possible for her to visit for three 
months in the Amoy region, from which most of the Rangoon Chinese have 
come. The months of study of the Chinese language and ways of life have 
given these leaders a new understanding of their people, and their people 
a new love for them. Last year, the Chinese commimity voluntarily took 
over the support of the scholarships in the day school which had been receiving 
support from America, not a large sum, but a step in the right direction. 
The great event of this year has been the building of an upper story over 
part of the school building. The school rooms had become so crowded that 
good work was impossible, and much time was wasted in moving children 
from one room to another. The addition, for which funds were on hand on 
the field, supplies two light airy classrooms, a wide veranda, and a hall large 
enough to hold a small library. 

There are many Indians in Burma, but the Methodist work among them 
has been limited. It was found possible to turn over our day schools to their 
Christian teachers, so they were sold to these masters, who carry them on as 
Christian institutions, but not under mission auspices. The arrangement has 
proved successful. 

We have Burmese work in four centers, Pegu, Thongwa, Twante, Rangoon. 
The only large institution is the Girls School in Rangoon, but in each of these 
places there is a significant religious movement, getting close to the everyday 
lives of the people. On the Pegu Circuit the evangelistic party camped in 
ten villages, giving every night pictures of three kinds, — first, pictures of 
general interest; then health pictures; then pictures representing Christ and 
his message. Interest, says the missionary, was even more keen than in former 
times, and always they asked, "When will you be coming again?" 

In Thongwa, the Neil Dexter Reid School puts much emphasis on training 
for village life, and gardening, rice cultivation, poultry raising and weaving 
are all a part of the school program. The new church, built in Burmese style 
with Burmese money, had a room which with the expenditure of $50 from 
the conference funds was made available for the use of the poorer mothers of 
the vicinity as a day nursery. The Thongwa Infant Welfare Society supplies 
milk for the babies, and sponsors a weekly clinic in charge of the hospital 
physician and the municipal midwife. "Some of us are always there," says 
the missionary, "getting acquainted with the mothers and babies, and having 
the doctor's help in deciding which of them needs us most." 

The Burmese Girls High School in Rangoon has a student body of almost 
four hundred, of whom seventy-three are hostel residents. In the hostel there 
is opportunity for definite rehgious cultivation, and throughout the school 
there is an emphasis on religion, though many of the pupils are not outwardly 
Christian. Various outside activities, such as health week, W. C. T. U. essay 
competitions, musical competitions, and Girl Guides, contribute their share 
to the development of the girls. The school has unlimited possibilities, some 
of which are well on the way to realization. 

Those who know Burma feel that she is astir, that the old conservatism 
is breaking down, that Buddhism is discontented and seeking something better. 
It is our day of opportunity. 

Mrs. Otis Moore, Official Correspondent. . 



China 23 

CHINA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

Central China Conference 

Chinkiang — Olivet Memorial Girls High School — Eulalia E. Fox*, Mary G. 

Kesler, Etha M. Nagler*, Faye H. Robinson, Bernice A. Wheeler.* 

Evangelistic and Day School Work — Clara Bell Smith. 
Nanking — Methodist Girls High School — Katherine B. Boeye, Anna Lulu 

Golisch*, Jessie L. Wolcott. Hi tt Bible Training School — To be supplied. 

Bible Teacher Training School — Joy L. Smith. Ginling College — Cora D. 

Reeves, Hariet M. Whitmer. Evangelistic and Day School Work — S. Marie 

Brethorst, Helen M. Galleher. 
WuHU — Evangelistic and Day School Work — Cora Leona Rahe*, Edith R. 

Youtsey, Iva M. Williamson.* Wuhu General Hospital — Frances E. 

Culley, R.N., Florence A. Sayles, R.N. 
Shanghai — Field Treasurer — Bessie A. Hollows. Literature — -Mary Liu. 

West China Conference 

Chengtu — Womans College, West China Union University — Ovidia Hansing, 
Pearl B. Fosnot.* Chengtu Senior and Junior Jligh School — Grace E. 
Manley, Mrs. Ola H. Dudley. City Evangelistic Work — Mabel E. Allen. 
School of Midwifery — Dr. Marion E. Manley. District Educational and 
Evangelistic Work — Ruth Gabosch. 

Chungking — Dsen Jia Ngai Center — Luella G. Koether, Gladys B. Harger. 
City Day Schools and Evangelistic Work — Dorothy Jones. District Educa- 
tional Work — Dorothy Jones. District Evangelistic Work — Annie M. Wells. 
Gamble Memorial Hospital and Dispensary — Lillian L. Holmes, R.N. 
Nurse's Training School, Gamble Memorial Hospital — Viola L. Miller, 
R.N. 

Suining — Stevens Memorial Girls Schools — Helen Desjardens. Higher and 
Lower Primary Schools and City Evangelistic Work — Charlotte Trotter*, 
L. Maud Parsons. District Work — Helen Desjardens. 

TzECHOw — Tzechow Girls Senior and Junior High School — Rhoda Burdeshaw*, 
Celia Cowan. Fidelia Dewitt Bible Training School — Lena Nelson. City 
and District Educational and Evangelistic Work — Orvia Proctor. 

Foochow Conference 

FoocHOW — Hwa Nan Missionary Faculty — Elizabeth H. Richey, Edith 
McBee*, Elsie H. Reik, M. Grace Davis, L. Ethel Wallace, Marion R. 
Cole, May Louise Lowe*, Eugenia Savage, Roxy Lefforge, Jane Carlson, 
Frances S. Fulton. Hwa Nan Middle School — Edith McBee. Girls 
Junior High and Primary — Florence J. Plumb, Myrtle A. Smith.* Tai 
Afaiu Hostess and Business Agent — Florence J. Plumb. Mary E. Crook 
Childrens Home and Kindergarten — Rose A. Mace. Biblical Institute — 
Rose A. Mace, J. Ellen Nevitt. Evangelistic Work — Phoebe C. Wells. 
Foochow Christian Union Hospital {McGraiv Hospital) — Margaret 
Tucker, M.D., Alice A. Wilcox, Frieda Staubli, R.N. Union Kindergar- 
ten Training School — Miss Eunice E. Smith. 

FuTSiNG — Marguerite Stewart Junior High School — Jennie D. Jones. Primary 
Day School and Higher Primary — Jennie D. Jones. Evangelistic Work and 
Station Class — Edith F. Abel. Lucie F. Harrison Hospital — Li Bi Cu, 
M.D. Woolston Memorial Dispensary (Lungtien) — Li Bi Cu, M.D. 
•On furlough. 



24 In Lands Afar 

H AITANG — - Kings Heralds Junior High and Primary School— Carrie M . Bartlett ^ 
Martha L. McCutcheon. Evangelistic Work and Station Class — Carrie M. 
Bartlett, Harriet J. Halverstadt*, Martha L. McCutcheon. 

KUTIEN — Girls High School — Martha A. Graf, Maybel Marion Holmes, Eva 
F. Sprunger.* 

MiNTSiNG — Girls Junior High atid Primary School — Mary M. Mann. Womans 
Training and Day Schools — ^Edna Jones. Evangelistic Work — Lydia 
Trimble.* Nathan Sites Memorial Hospital — Ruth V. Hemenway, M.D.* 
Hostess in Shanghai — -Ursula Tyler*, Julia A. Bonafield. 

Special Appointment — Nurses Association of China — -Cora E. Simpson, R.N. 
General Secretary Religious Work for China — -Miss Roxy Lefforge. 

Hinghwa Conference 

HiNGHWA — Hamilton Girls High School — Ellen H. Suffern, Sylvia E. Aldrich. 
City Primary — Ellen H. Suffern. Day Schools — Sylvia E. Aldrich. Juliet 
Turner Womans School and Evangelistic Work — Pauline E. Wescott.* 
Hinghwa City and District Bible Women — Althea M. Todd, E. Blanche 
Apple, Mary A. Johnson*, Sigrid C. Bjorklund.* 

Hanking AND HoehBing Districts — HankongGirls School — Sylvia E. Aldrich. 
Lillian Gamble Leper Home — Althea M. Todd. City Evangelistic Work — ■ 
Jessie A. Marriott. Station Classes — Jessie A. Marriott. Hankong District 
Bible Women — Althea M. Todd, Jessie A. Marriott. 

SiENYU — Frances Nasi Gamble Memorial School — Edna F. Merritt. Lsabel 
Hart Boarding School — F. Pearl Mason. Freida Knoechel Bible Womans 
Training School — A. Beta Scheirich.* West District Day School — F. Pearl 
Mason. West District Bible Women — A. Beta Scheirich.* Margaret Eliza 
Nasi Memorial Hospital — Emma J. Betow, M.D. Margaret Eliza Nasi 
School of Nursing — Emma M. Palm, R.N. 

Kiangsi Conference 

KiUKiANG — Ridison Girls High School — Helen Ferris, Clara M. French, 
Laura M. Schleman, c.t., Leona Thomasson, Rose E. Waldron.* Knowles 
Bible Training School — Edith Fredericks*. Jenny Lind, Ellen E. Smith, 
May Bel Thompson. Danforth Memorial Hospital — Geneva Miller, R.N. 
Evangelistic and Day School Work — Mabel A. Woodruff, Annie M. 
Pittman. 

Nanchang — Baldwin School — Gertrude M. Cone*, Ruth N. Daniels, Elsie 
May Danskin, Myra L. McDade, Margaret Seeck (leave of absence). 
Ida Kahn Women's and Children's Hospital — Blanche T. Search. Evan- 
gelistic and Day School Work — Blanche T. Search, Frances E. VVoodruflf, 
Bessie L. Meeker. 

North China Conference 

Changli — Alderman School — Pansy Pearl Griffin*, Ellen M. Studley, 
Marguerite Twinem, E. Fern McCaig. District Day Schools and Evangel- 
istic Work — Clara Pearl Dyer*, Irma Highbaugh, Mabel Nowlin, (part 
time). Director of Medical and Health Edtication — Viola Lantz, M,D.* 
Thompson Woman's School — Ellen M. Studley, Treasurer. 

Peiping — Mary Porter Gamewell School — Henrietta Rossiter, Vena I. Radley, 
Dora C. Fearon*, Mary Watrous (part time), Marie Adams. City and 
District Evangelistic Work and District Educational Work — L. Maude 
Wheeler, Ortha Lane. Sleeper Davis Hospital — Alice M. Powell, R.N., 
Elizabeth Carlyle. Union Bible Training School — Maude Wheeler. 
Yenching College for Women — Ruth L. Stahl, Monona L. Cheney.* 
Woman's Training School, Emma M. Knox. 

*On furlough. 



China 25 

Tientsin — Keen School — Ida Frantz, Myra Jaquet, Mary Bedell, Minta 
Stahl, Myra Snow, Emma Wilson. Primary Schools — Elizabeth Hobart.* 
City Evangelistic Work — Birdice Lawrence. Isabella Fisher Hospital — 
Lora O. Battin.* Isabella Fisher Hospital School of Nursing — Maggie 
May Prentice. 
Special Appointments — 

Shanghai — China Christian Educational Association — Mabel R. Nowlin 

(part time). 
Tientsin — Secretary of Religious Work for Women and Children of North 

China Woman's Conference — Ortha Lane. 
Peiping — Director of Public Health, North China Woman's Conference — 

Ruth Danner. 

Shantung Conference 

Taianfu — Marie Brown Davis School — Elsie L. Knapp.* Edna Terry Train- 
ing School and Evangelistic Work — Nora M. Dillenbeck. 

Tsinanfu — Union Work — Shantung Christian University Medical School — 
E. Florence Evans, R.N.*, Mollie E. Townsend, R.N., Julia E. Morgan, 
M.D., Frances R. Wilson, R.N., Mary Katherine Russell.* 

Yenping Conference 

'Yenping — Emma Fuller Memorial School — Mary L. Eide. Womans Bible 
Training School — Fern M. Sinkey*, Trudy Schlaefli. Francesca Nast 
Gamble Memorial School, Day School and Kindergarten — Frieda Reiman, 
Gusta A. Robinett. Evangelistic Work — Mamie F. Glassburner. 



CENTRAL CHINA 

Chinkiang — Olivet Memorial Girls High School. It was the privilege of 
the official correspondent to visit the official field during the summer. School 
was in session at Chinkiang. The enrollment was better this past year than the 
year previous. The type of work which is being done seems to be very high 
grade. Miss Robinson was home during the summer due to the illness of her 
father. Miss Nagler left on furlough, thus leaving Miss Kesler alone. 

Miss Smith is carrying on the Evangelistic and Day School Work and is 
doing very splendidly in that capacity. 

Nanking — Methodist Girls High School. It was my privilege to see five 
hundred eighty girls assembled for chapel period. The school has trebled in 
attendance during the past few years. One thing which impressed me very 
greatly was the need of some co-ordination between the parents of the homes 
represented in our schools and the students themselves. If we as a group are 
going to claim any of these outstanding leaders of Nanking, we must secure 
ways and means of linking them up more definitely with the Christian Church 
and Christian activity. We have the parents,, merchants, party leaders, pro- 
fessional type such as doctors and dentists, in fact, a great many of them are 
the leaders of Nanking, and yet we will have only two missionaries in this large 
school. We should decide the policy of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society as to the type of work we are to do in our schools as well as the number 
with whom we can deal efficiently. 

Ginling College is a splendid institution and we can count ourselves very 
fortunate to have two representatives, Miss Cora D. Reeves and Miss Harriet 
M. Whitmer. 

The Evangelistic Work both in the city of Nanking and in the outlying 
district is most challenging. It was my privilege to visit the day schools with 
Miss Brethorst and Miss Mei-lien Chung, and also to go out into the country 

•On furlough. 



26 In Lands Ajar 

with Miss Galleher. Our church needs much in the Hne of greater strength to 
meet the growing needs of the increasing population. 

WuHU — The secretary saw our Rvangelisiic and Day School Work. There 
is a great challenge for work at Wuhu, in the midst of the drought and flood 
district. Wuhu is progressing rapidly. Government schools are meeting some 
of the vital needs along educational lines but somehow the Church does not have 
the type of a challenging program which we wish it might have in this city. 

Our work in the General Hospital, with Miss Culley and Miss Sayles, is 
most helpful and most needy, especially if one can see with her own eyes the 
type who need hospitalization through that territory of Anwhei. Surely this 
is not time for the Christian Church to withdraw from our fields of labor but it 
is time for us to study the type of program we wish to see instituted in these 
needy fields. 

Mrs. Leon Roy Peel, Official Correspondent. 

WEST CHINA 
Chengtu and Chungking Conferences 

West China no longer need be termed remote if we are to determine 
distance by expeditious travel. Six days out of every seven, amphibian planes 
make flights over three sections of the Yangtse River and the trip from 
Shanghai to Chengtu, the capital of Szechuan Province, can be made in laps 
of a few hours out of each of three days. A recent visitor said that in his 
flying trip to Chengtu, he witnessed three wonders of the world: one a natural 
monument, the Yangtse Gorges; the second, flying in the interior of China, 
from Hankow to Chengtu, in nine hours; the third wonder, a great university, 
thriving eight hundred miles from any railroad. 

Travel within the Province of Szechuan has been greatly facilitated in 
recent years. It is a thrilling experience to fly in two hours over the moun- 
tainous ranges between Chengtu and Chungking, a journey which, if made 
by sedan chair, would take nine or ten days, or, if made by auto, two or three 
days. "Big" roads in West China are beginning to be a realization and native 
driven, so-called buses, make the routes between several of the large cities. 

Militarism, tax robbery of the masses and opium have made this area 
ripe for communistic encroachment and it has been a dangerous menace. 
It is said that the commuinst army neither uses opium nor exacts "squeeze," 
but the opium-sodden, poorly-paid, under-fed armies of Szechuan have not 
been able to cope with them. Provincial to the last degree as the Szechuanese 
are yet, the military leader and governor of the province felt called upon to 
ask aid of Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek and the 3'ear 1935 will go down 
in the history of West China as the year General Chiang, his wife and his 
well disciplined troops made their first sojourn in this unique and promising 
land. 

The influence of this Christian general and his well trained army in 
West China has been extraordinary. The people have faith in his sincerity 
and leadership. With General Chiang in control of military forces, the war 
clouds have been dispelled. He has declared that opium must be eradicated, 
opium dens closed and the use of it forbidden. The practise of unfair taxes 
has been abolished. He in no uncertain terms has told the leaders in all walks 
of life that the condition in which the country finds itself today is the result 
of their own sin and selfishness. He has led them in sacrificial giving for their 
country and preached that the only way out for them is the way of truth, 
justice and honesty. Sherwood Eddy said after his visit in West China in the 
fall of 1934, "China is today the greatest evangelistic field in the world and 
Szechuan Province the greatest opportunity in all China." The wide-spread, 
influence of General Chiang has put greater emphasis on this assertion. 



China 27 

While we count fewer missionaries we are happy to report an increasing 
number of well-trained Nationals. There are today six women graduates of 
the univ^ersity and eight who have had special training in institutions in other 
parts of China who are filling places of leadership. 

No new stations have been opened in recent years but as certain types of 
work have become more self-supporting, advancement has been made in 
developing other lines of work. The Gamble Memorial Hospital in Chungking 
has within recent months become largely self-supporting and they have 
extended their efforts into rural areas in promoting public health and hygiene. 

There is decided evidence within the last few years of an increased interest 
in the part of native trained workers in the rural needs of their own people. 
This is demonstrated by the fact that one of our specially trained young 
women, a college graduate, has taken over the responsibilities of a district 
missionary in carrying the educational work, and another, specially trained 
in religious education, has assumed the evangelistic work on this same district. 
In one of our educational institutions, a school pin was adopted as required 
by local authorities. The missionaries chose a simple bowl-shaped design in 
red and white, thinking that Christ's cup of cold water certainly wouJd be a 
bowl of tea in China. This badge was a true symbol of service in Christ's 
name, a service from one who is clean and pure and willing to give of self. 
Out of this grew organized bands through which were given opportunities to 
join in some type of Christian service. Under the leadership of one of the 
fine teachers about fifty volunteered, each of whom gave regular attendance 
to some form of Christian activity, in the city or rural communities round 
about. Other similar activities could be recorded in other schools. Students 
in different centers have entered into the responsibility of adult education 
through station classes, institutes, industrial classes, night schools, demon- 
strations in public health and hygiene. 

More and more within the last year or two the kindergarten and primary 
schools in the four large centers have assumed self-support. Slowly they have 
been reducing the amount of loans to the girls in all our schools, the help for 
board has decreased a very large per cent and the amount received on tuition 
fees has more than doubled. On the other hand, with the lack of American 
staff whose salaries are paid in America, additional funds have been needed 
for the hiring of Chinese teachers. The continued cuts, reduction in exchange 
grants and failure of banks where funds were deposited, have made the task 
one of difficulty. 

Very little building has been done in West China in recent years though 
there are needs waiting to be met. The Lewis Memorial Institutional Church, 
a project long proposed and planned for, has been built in Chungking. Within 
this center of Methodist work, the Society was literally forced to build a 
primary school building. The government had condemned the building in 
use and after part of the roof had fallen in, luckily out of school hours, $2500 
was taken from the building funds held for West China and a three-story 
school building was erected. Within this building is placed a memorial plate 
in memory of Miss Emma Louise Sinclair, seventeen years corresponding 
secretary of Northwestern Branch and official correspondent for West China 
all these years. 

Mrs. Frank E. Baker, Official Correspondent. 

FOOCHOW CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

FoocHOW — For several years the request has been made for a teacher for 
the Union Kindergarten Training School. We are happy to have just sent 
Miss Eunice Smith for this work. 

Our Girls Boarding School, Tai Maiu, under the direction of Miss Mary 



28 In Lands Afar 

Carleton is co-operating in the "New Movement" with added Christian ideals.. 
Passion week was especially observed, the girls giving one of the Y.W.C.A. 
Easter pageants. 

FuTsiNG — The Marguerite Stewart Girls School has celebrated its fortieth, 
anniversary, Janet Ho and a committee of the alumnae in charge. Gifts for 
endowment and laboratory equipment were received. Political conditions have 
been more quiet. Auto service now takes only three hours from Futsingto 
Foochow. Miss Jennie Jones writes: "People who are awakening to the world 
around them can not long remain blind to the needs and benefits of education 
for themselves and their children." 

Haitang — The Kings Heralds Girls School has had a most successful 
year. Never did the message of peace and good will mean more to Haitang 
than this year. 

KuTiEN — -"This has been a splendid year in every respect, the 'New Life 
Movement' promoted by General and Mrs. Chiang Kai Shek has been felt in 
the most out-of-the-way places especially where cleanliness is concerned. The 
bandits have been banished, communists driven back for the present, at 
least." T\\e Girls High School, city primary day schools and kindergarten have 
all had a fine enrollment. The Women's Industrial School with its thirty-two 
students, has been not only studying the Bible but home-training and other 
studies. In the afternoon they sit at their looms and spinning wheels, learning 
a trade. 

MlNTSlNG— "It is just seventy years since Dr. Sites came to Mintsing. 
Now, we are watching our junior high school girls at work with the children in 
village schools and church. Out over the district there are nine of these little 
groups learning what Jesus and his message means. There are many things, the 
singing hours, social times, children's meetings and other activities. There is 
still much to be done but we are glad for the doors we have been permitted to 
enter." 

Evangelistic Work 

Foochow — Miss Roxy Lefforge, general secretary of our religious work in 
China for the Methodist Church writes that she is greatly encouraged over the 
work in Foochow Conference. She adds, "It is great to be alive and at work in 
China to-day." 

The Woman's Biblical Institute is graduating fine young Chinese Bible 
women who are very much sought after by the Chinese churches. They are 
also going out to establish centers not only to teach the women to read but 
Christianity, home improvements, sewing and other useful things. One of the 
graduates of this institution, writes Miss Rose Mace, has been selected to take 
charge of a center financed by a representative of the Electric Light Company 
of Foochow. He selected a village with poor land and poorly located. He 
helped the farmers drain the land and so improve their crops. He is a graduate 
of an agricultural school, not a Christian, but interested in social improvement. 

Another evangelistic center under the direction of Miss Phoebe Wells is 
located in the old Woolston Memorial building doing an equally fine work 
among another class. 

Haitang — -This station has the largest number of probationers. It con- 
ducts a large station class where Bible women and other national workers are 
preparing to carry the message. The story of these consecrated workers reads 
like the Acts of the Apostles. 

Located so far from unfavorable civic conditions, the missionaries have an 
opportunity for service much more than in some other stations. 

FuTsiNG — "Although there have been poor crops and practically a famine 
in parts of the district, progress has been made in nearly every phase of our 
work," writes Miss Abel. Political conditions have been more quiet and it has 



China 29" 

been possible to travel without fear of bandits. The new auto roads have 
brought the villages nearer to the large centers. 

Wonderful meetings have been held on Lungtien District. The Better 
Homes Campaign brought large crowds to the church. Fellowship Group and 
Training Conferences have been held. A recent meeting had as its subject, 
"Japan." The women were greatly surprised to know that in a country which 
they had come to feel was their enemy, there are thousands of Christians,, 
especially among the women, who oppose the policy of their government and 
who daily pray for their sisters in China. 

MiNTSiNG — "The students of our Bible Training School," writes Edna 
Jones, "have been carrying on the village work during their vacation. A 
candle lighting service was held, the company marching out of the church 
carrying their tiny lights and singing, "Jesus bids us shine." How the liv^es of 
these simple farmer folks are lighting this remote mountain village. 

Medical Work 

FooCHOW — Foochoiu Christian Union i/o5/)t7a/, formerly Magaw Hospital, 
is now greatly enlarged by its union with the American Board and the Board of 
Foreign Missions. During the erection of the fine new buildings the work is 
being carried on at Magaw. The last report tells the story of the fine work 
being done: 16,000 treatments, 1,500 cared for in the hospital, 150 major 
operations performed, 900 X-ray examinations and 100 babies safely brought 
into the world. 

Frieda Staubli, superintendent of the Nurses Training School writes that 
Christmas was a season of peace in Foochow, a contrast to last year. 

The School of Nursing has an enrollment of sixty-two. and graduates are 
in demand. The Nanking Government has created a department of nursing 
with the head of the National Nurses Association as its president. 

A bit of Christmas cheer was taken to the leper village — where there are 
over ninety church members and probationers. 

FuTSiNG — The Lucie F. Harrison Hospital reports a busy year — 1235 
in-patients, 13,008 patient days, 7 major operations, 332 baby cases. Dr. 
Li Bi Cu is in charge of the work and she also directs the Woolstmt Memorial 
Dispensary where nearly 4000 treatments are reported. A large class of nurses 
has graduated from the hospital. 

Haitang Dispensary is carrying on a greatly needed work on that island so 
far from other medical help. It reports twenty beds, 3024 patient days, ten 
major operations under the care of a fine Chinese doctor. 

MiNTSiNG — The Nathan Sites Memorial Hospital has a staff of eight 
nurses, one Bible woman and a Chinese doctor. Dr. Hemenway being now on 
furlough. The record of cases ministered to is remarkable — 5575 treatments, 
331 operations, 435 preventive inocculations. 

Mrs. E. L. Harvey, Official Correspondent. 



HINGHWA CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

Miss Sylvia Aldrich,the field correspondent reports that notwithstanding 
earthquakes and typhoons, the work of the Hinghwa Conference has gone 
steadily forward. 

"The recent typhoons played havoc with Sienyu, a large part of the 
primary building was blown down," writes Miss Mason, "part of the woman's 
school, part of the newest and highest building at the Margaret Nast Memorial 
Hospital and the east end of Dr. Betow's cottage had all the brick facing^ 
ripped off." 



30 In Lands Afar 

A cable received just before General Executive Committee Meeting asks 
that two new missionaries be sent to replace those on furlough who are not able 
to return. 

The missionaries write of the happy Christmas days. The people had just 
held their winter festival so they crowded in to see what a Christian festival 
was like. On this day the church people bring thank-ofiferings of cakes, oranges, 
firecrackers or money. All the schools have a part on the program. At the 
children's meeting over 200 were present. 

The Hamilton Girls School in Hinghwa, the City Primary, the Elizabeth 
Lewis Girls School in Hankong, the Juliet Turner Bible Training School, the 
Fannie Nast Gamble and the Isabel Hart Girls Boarding School, despite lack 
of workers, report a fine year's work. 

Evangelistic Work 

A fine picture of the Honkong Missio7i has been received, the work Miss 
Todd and Miss Marriott are doing. The church has the largest congregation 
of any in the conference. There are 100 members of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society and ninety women and children are being taught in their 
homes. 

Miss Merritt writes that her girls in Sienyu keep up their interest in the 
Standard Bearers. At a recent meeting mite boxes were brought in. Fifteen 
dollars in gold was contributed by the King's Heralds and Little Light Bearers. 
The money came in coppers and it was a happy group of ofificers who counted 
it and made the report. It was sent to a leper mission in Shanghai. The 
money received from the dues will be sent to their little sisters in Africa. 

Medical Work 

For several years an S. O. S. call has come from Sienyu for a doctor for 
the Margaret Elizabeth Nast Hospital. Dr. Betow who has done such line 
work must soon come home to retire. Five thousand five hundred fifty-three 
patients were ministered to this last year. 

The nurses at this hospital have also cared for the lepers in the Gamble 
Lepers Home. At Christmas they had a happy time. They were so pleased 
with a piece of cloth and a hot water bottle which each received. 

Mrs. E. L. Harvey, Official Correspondent. 

KIANGSI CONFERENCE 

KiUKiANG — The first visit made by the official correspondent was at 
Kiukiang. It was a thrill that I shall never forget, for there were one hundred 
children of our day schools, high schools, Knowles Bible Training School, 
national faculty leaders and missionaries, together with the evangelistic 
workers of the city, who met me at the Bund. I was welcomed in real Chinese 
fashion by firecrackers which were fired along the entire route from the Bund 
to the mission compound. 

Rtilison High School seemed to be in very good condition and our mis- 
sionaries and faculty were carrying on a very high-type school. 

Knowles Bible Training School has been studying the needs of the com- 
munity and the requirements of the Government, and is attempting to put 
in new work which we trust will better meet the present requirements. 

At Danforth Memorial Hospital, Miss Miller together with Dr. Chen, 
Dr. Peh, and the nurses are doing a splendid piece of work. They have been 
attempting to have their Training School for Nurses carried on co-operatively 
with the nurses at the Water of Life Hospital, but as for close co-operation the 
hospitals are just far enough apart to make it inconvenient. The little children 
at Kiukiang together with the leaders, raised a memorial fund for Nora Kellogg 



China 31 

and now have established a children's ward with new beds. The hospital has 
had considerable renovating under the leadership of Miss Ruth Danner and 
continued by Miss Miller. We wish to express our appreciation to North China 
for loaning us Miss Danner, but the great need is for a doctor. This point is 
conceded by all missionaries on the field and by the field reference committee 
as one of the chief needs. 

N.\NCHANG — Baldwin School was in session when I visited there. The 
school is being used greatly by the New Life Movement groups who were 
holding early sessions on various occasions for the representative members of 
each family in Nanchang. 

Nanchang has changed very noticeably in the past few years. They now 
have wide boulevards, a chain of lakes in the downtown section, a city park, 
many new homes which have been erected on the old execution ground just 
outside the old Baldwin Compound, and a new hotel as modern as we have 
in our own city. 

The new church of the Board of Foreign Missions was just being com- 
pleted; mone\' had been given for the erection of the edifice. They, however, 
lacked a small amount for the completion and did not have money enough to 
warrant the furnishings. 

The ofilicial correspondent understands that Miss Margaret Seeck has 
been released by Topeka Branch and granted a year's leave of absence to 
serve as secretary to Madame Chiang Kai Shek. 

The work at Ida Kahn Women's and Children's Hospital was being carried 
on by Dr. Alice Wang. The hospital is in very good condition but it is a 
question of just how it can do its most effective work. It is separated by about 
one-half hour's distance from the General Board Hospital. 

Miss Search carries on the Evangelistic and Day School Work as well as 
being business manager for the Ida Kahn Women's and Children's Hospital,, 
and Miss Frances Woodruff has taken care of the country evangelistic work. 
It is not easy to carry on in this section of Kiangsi Province because of the 
continued inconvenience of travel. Miss Meeker worked throughout the 
entire year at Lichuan, the new rural reconstruction work. 

Mrs. Leon Roy Peel, Official Correspondent. 

NORTH CHINA CONFERENCE 

The united and zealous purpose of our work in North China is "to serve 
the present age." Like other fields, the beginnings of the work were in the city 
centers. But the last few years have brought the call of the country, where 
eighty-five per cent of the people live in small villages. 

Since life in the villages centers in the home, the most direct approach to 
both the community and the individual is through the home. Hence, the 
Christianizing the Home Movement, which was the fore-runner of the Better 
Homes Campaign. 

The Better Homes Campaign was carefully planned to meet the entire 
need of the community, the home and the individual through spiritual, edu- 
cational, physical and economic channels. The campaigns are intensive, 
lasting sometimes a week, sometimes over the week-end. To convince families 
that the entire home can be changed, is one problem, to get them to try it is 
another. 

(a) Spiritual and Educational — While the teaching of the thousand 
characters is the basis of the educational side of the Better Homes Campaign, 
a spiritual dynamic is absolutely essential to its success. Our pastor says that 
"no teacher who was not a Christian has ever stayed by the class through the 
four months necessary to learn the first one thousand characters." "Every 
village where the movement has lasted has had a Christian fam.ily sponsoring 
it." 



32 In Lands Ajar 

Mass education has been most valuable in work with adults since it is 
there most of the lay leaders of a district are discovered. As they take responsi- 
bility for others, they feel the need for more training and a deeper spiritual 
life for themselves. There have been some happy surprises in local leadership 
training. One pastor and wife, through the fall and winter, gathered a group of 
young men and young women into the parsonage regularly. Through a mutual 
interest in Chinese musical instruments, they led them on to other interests, 
and from there to activities in Christian service. 

Evangelistic and educational work is so closely related that the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Conference of 1932, combined the two committees into one 
large committee, which they named the Committee on Religious Education. 
This large committee they divided into two sections- — 

1. To deal with the problems and interests of religious education and 
evangeUsm for the home and adults. 

2. To deal with the same problems for young people and children. 

(b) Physical — The campaign for better bodies is much appreciated. 
Through health demonstrations leaders tell of possible help for and prevention 
of trachoma and tuberculosis; the evils of narcotics; of a God who designed our 
bodies, and intends that women shall walk on their feet as He made them. 
There are meetings for the training of mothers in child care and child feeding; 
training classes in mid-wifery. 

Two books have been prepared by one of our doctors. One is on pre-natal 
care; care at birth and care after birth. The other book is on home hygiene. 
Mr. T. H. Sun, editor of the "Christian Farmer," has translated these into the 
thousand characters and published them. This same doctor prepared in one 
year, four hundred reading lessons on health, and illustrated them by making 
posters from pictures in old magazines. Ten thousand people saw her health 
demonstration on Temple Fair Day. 

(c) Economic- — The village family is being better fed by learning how 
properly to prepare the soil of their small farm for the vegetables and fruits 
they raise; by learning to choose better quality seeds; by learning to choose the 
best fruits for their location; to choose the best strain of chickens, how to feed 
them to get the best and most eggs; to raise better rabbits. They are also 
taught to budget the family income. At first certain villages were chosen as 
laboratories for the Better Homes experiment. But the work was so successful 
that it could not be confined to place, group or routine. Through the North 
China Christian Rural Service Union, which is composed of seven Boards and 
six co-operating educational units, there is an exchange of ideas, and excellent 
co-operation as they all make their best contribution to Better Homes. 

Advance Among Women — Women have made a remarkable advance in 
North China during the past few years. Once they thought they could not have 
prayers at home unless the men were there to do the praying. Now, evangelistic 
bands are often made up entirely of women. Some well-to-do women fill their 
own carts with women and take them to neighboring villages to do evangelistic 
work. The fact that every woman must learn to read the Bible and to pray, 
before she is received into the church, has been a hastening factor in women's 
advance. 

Workers' Institutes are available for all women workers. For instance, 
last year, just after conference, women workers from one city, and those from 
an adjoining district, met for a week in a Workers' Institute. Their daily 
program was, morning watch, general devotions, classes on women's work in 
the churches, methods, home problems, lectures, reading and recreation. At 
the close of the week they held a three-day conference with the men workers. 
Throughout the entire Institute there were joint evening revival meetings. 

Music — The Chinese love and are making r7pid advance in music. Our 
schools are turning out excellent teachers and artists. Our glee clubs are taking 
first place among government and municipal competitive groups; our soloists 



China ZZ 

are winning first honors, also. Our choral societies are making the Messiah 
their own as they sing it year after year. 

Oratory — That oratory is at the fore in our girls schools, is a stimulating 
surprise. In one city where there was an inter-school science oratorical contest, 
twenty-two schools competing, our junior high girls took first place; the senior 
high girls, fourteen schools competing, took fourth place. The school again won 
first place in the regional contest. 

Athletics — Athletics is one of the few activities which touches every girl 
in a school. As the girls on their own fields, or in regional competition, practice 
honesty, justice and fair play, athletics has outstanding value as a Christian 
character builder. The Chinese "house divided against itself" is bringing its 
youth together through various forms of athletic training, scoutcraft, first aid, 
and other related activities. 

The Student Church is decidedly a present age activity. Some student 
groups have their own church, for every detail of which they are responsible, 
and through which they are developing initiative and magnificent organizational 
sense. 

Rural Institute — The W.F.M.S. has just granted funds for the development 
of home economics under the Rural Institute operated by Cheeloo University. 
One of our own girls is heading up this fascinating work. Of her work, the 
President of China says that she is lifting at a lower level of human life than any 
one who has approached China's need in that field. He asks that she be allowed 
to assist with Government Rural Reconstruction. By thus ardently serving 
the "present age" in China, our girls who represent us there are laying founda- 
tions for the future age where sturdy Christian character will be most needful. 

Mrs, J. K. Cecil, Official Correspondent. 

YENPING CONFERENCE 

The new conference report "Candle Lighting in Yenping," strikes an 
optimistic note. Since the previous conference report was published the thirty 
Bible women and the thirty primary school teachers have carried on their work 
through three years of unprecedented anxiety and danger, but at the last con- 
ference session they greeted Bishop Gowdy with happy faces and glorious 
reports of the victories God had given them. "This now promises to be a 
peaceful and uninterrupted year" writes the field correspondent. Miss Robinett. 
"We have already enjoyed a quiet half year. No matter what the future may 
hold that cannot be taken away from us. School schedules have been crowded 
because of making up last year's lost time. We have a larger enrolment this 
year and the spiritual life of our pupils has been deepened. We hope to be out 
on the district in February and March if peaceful conditions continue. With 
present financial conditions, we are more than grateful if we can carry on 
without serious cuts." 

"We have made no changes in our estimates except to cancel our request 
for a new missionary to teach music. We are badly in need of some one but 
are hoping that a good Chinese music teacher can be found." 

The Bible women have bee/i working in unison with the missionary forces 
at home, building their "Altar of Sacrifice," walling in their "Well of Salvation," 
and lighting their candles on their "Altar of Lights." Closely interlocked with 
the work of the Bible women is that of the eight primary day schools. 

The Emma Fuller School is now coeducational. Esther Ling is the Dean. 
She has a real concern for the spiritual life of the girls. Besides regular morning 
and evening prayers she meets with them for a short devotional period after 
supper. 

On the tenth anniversary of the Fukien Missionary Society every auxiliary 
sent gifts to the Mother Society. 

During the recent Communistic occupation of Yungan, our Girls School 
was not only unmolested but a special guard was appointed by the Com- 



34 In Lands Ajar 

mander who said "A girls school is a good thing; this is one creditable thing 
which the Church has done." 

A graduate of the Woman's Bible Institute in Foochow, Miss Amy Wu, 
has joined the staff of the Yevping Bible Training School. It is the first time 
that a teacher has been secured w ith special Bible training. 

A letter has this interesting statement, "Recently our fine Cieneral Wei 
was moved from Yenping to a point further inland where he has been commis- 
sioned to rid the place of communists. We are hoping that his nearness to us 
will still serve to keep our part of the province as quiet and peaceful as it has 
been during the past year but we shall greatly miss our fellowship with him 
and his wife as well as certain members of his staff. Mrs. Wei is an earnest 
Christian and has taken an active interest in our school and church work in 
Yenping, teaching, leading chapel and making various addresses. She is the 
product of our Woman's Foreign Missionary schools in North China and has 
studied four years in America." 

Mrs. E. L. Harvey, Official Correspondent. 

INDIA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 
Bengal Conference 
AsANSOL — Ushagram Girls School — Hazel O. Wood. District Evangelistic Work 

and Day Schools — Rachel Carr. 
Calcutta — Girls High School — Irma D. Collins. Evangelistic Work and Day 

Schools, Bengali: Katharine M. Kinzly; Hindustani: Doris I. Welles. All 

India Treasurer {Lucknmv Conference) Ethel L. Whiting. 
Darjeeling — Mt. Hermon School — Mrs. Lila K. Engberg*, Ruth Field, Pearl 

Hughes, Miriam R. Scholberg. 
Pakur — Bengali Work {Evangelistic, Boarding School, Day Schools) — Eugenia 

Norberg. San tali l]'ork (Evangelistic, Boarding School, Day Schools) — 

Mildred L. Pierce*, Beulah M. Swan. 
Special Appointments — Ava Hunt, Lulu A. Boles, Isabella Thoburn College^ 

Lucknow; Mary F. Carpenter*, Educational Secretary, Pakur; Emma J. 

Barber, Bangalore. 
To Be Appointed — Martha Gayle Dawson, Hilda Swan. 

Bombay Conference 

Basim — Girls School and Hostel — Ada Nelson (until July). Evangelistic Work — 

Edna Holder*, Clara E. Kleiner (until July). 
Bombay — Gujarati Schools and Evangelistic \]'ork, General Work and Hostel — 

Florence F. Masters. Marathi Day Schools and Evangelistic Work — 

S. Marie Corner. 
Nagpur — Girls School, Normal School and Hostel — Mildred Wright, Jennie 

Blasdell*, Ada Nelson (after July). Evangelistic Work — May E. Suther- 
land*, Mildred G. Drescher. 
PooNA — Taylor High School — Agnes C. W. Dove. Evangelistic Work — Anna 

A. Abbott. 
PuNTAMBA — Evangelistic Work and Hostel — Bernice E. Elliott, Flora Quirin. 

Medical Work — Local Supply. 
Talegaon — Girls School and Hostel — Leola M. Greene, Emma Stewart, 

Clara E. Kleiner (after July). 
Special Appointments — Isabella Thoburn College — Ruth C. Manchester*. 

Marathi Literary Work — Anna A. Abbott. 
*0n furlough. 



India 35 

Central Provinces Conference 

Baihar — School and Hostel — Katherine Keyhoe, Marian Warner*, Lola M. 

Green . 
Jagdalpur — Alderman School — Local Supply. Evangelistic Work and District 

Schools— Mrs. Alma H. Holland*, Helen E. Fehr. 
JuBBULPORE — Johnson Girls School — E. Lahuna Clinton, Faithe Richardson, 

Eleanor Campbell, Gertrude A. Becker*. Hwa Bagh Training College— 

Luci,le Colony. City Evangelistic Work — Letha L Daubendiek*, Local 

Supply. 
Khandw.a. — School and City Evangelistic Work — Lydia S. Pool. Normal 

School — Dorcas Hall*, Josephine Liers. Evangelistic Work — Josephine 

Liers, Hazel Rogers.* 
Raipur — School and Hostel — Margaret Crouse. Evangelistic Work — Ethel E. 

Ruggles. 
Special Appointments — Isabella Thorbum College — Margaret Wallace. 

Educational Secretary — Mary F. Carpenter. 

Gujarat Conference 

Ahmedabad — Kathiawar District — Village Educational and Evangelistic 
Work — Elizabeth J. Turner*, Bessie E. Rigg (deceased), Elsie M. Ross.* 

Baroda — Webb Memorial Girls School — Grace M. Challis*, Dora L. Nelson. 
Educational and Evangelistic Work — Florence K. Palmer. Afrs. Williayn 
Butler Memorial Hospital — Loal E. Huffman, ALD., Myrtle L. Precise, 
R.N. City Evangelistic Work and Editor " Balvadi" — Laura F. Austin.* 

GoDHRA — Normal Training and Practising School — Elma M. Chilson, Pearl 
Precise. District Evangelistic Work — Laura A. Heist*, Minnie Newton.* 

Nadiad — City Ediicational and Evangelistic Work — Fern Carter. 

To BE Appointed — Mary L. Hannah, R.N. 

Hyderabad Conference 

BiDAR — Girls Boarding School — Mrs. Margaret C. Ernsberger. District 

Evangelistic work — Minnie H. Huibregtse, Anna M. Harrod.* 
Hyderabad — Stanley Girls High School — Margaret Morgan. Girls Vocational 

School — Elizabeth J. Wells, Dorothea Anderson.* Hindistani Work — 

Gladys IVL Webb. 
Tandur — Evangelistic and Educational Work — Mabel Morgan, Mildred 

Simonds.* 
Sironcha — Sironcha Coeducational School — Nell F. Naylor, Ada J. Lauck. 

Clason Memorial Hospital — Stella M. Dodd, M.D. (loaned to Tablet 

Industry at Bowringpet for one year). Frances C. Davis Girls School — 

A. Gail Patterson.* 
ViK.\RABAD — Afary A. Knotts Girls School — Nellie AL Low. Evangelistic and 

Educational Work — IVL Katherine Metsker. 

Indus River Conference 

AjMER — Boarding School — Caroline C. Nelson, E. Lavinia Nelson. 

Hissar — Boarding School — Ethel Palmer, Martha Coy, District Work — Agnes 
H. Nilsen. 

Lahore — Lucie Harrison Girls School — -Theodora Thomson. District Evange- 
list — Grace Pepper Smith. 

Tilaunia- — Mary Wilson Sanitarium — Cora L Kipp, M.D.*, Freda Haffner, 
M.D., Laura Bell, R.N.*, Beulah V. Bishop, R.N., Agnes D. Dunn, 
Helma J. Fernstrom. 

*On furlough. 



36 In Lands Ajar 

Lucknow Conference 

Arrah — Boarding School — Maren M. Tirsgaard, Irene C. Baer. District 
Evangelist — Ruth E. Hyneman. 

BuxAR — District Evangelist — Edna M. Abbott.* 

Ballia — Primary Education — Nettie A. Bacon*, Mabel Sheldon. 

Cawnpore — Girls High School — Jessie A. Bragg*, Adis A. Robbins, Edna M. 
Hutchens. Hudson Memorial Girls School — Mary A. Richmond. 

GONDA^ — ^Ruth Eveland. 

Lucknow — Lai Bagh School — Grace C. Davis, Mabel C. Lawrence, Kathleen 
Clancy. Isabella Thoburn College — Mary E. Shannon, Pm;,«'/?a/. Dorothy 
Spear*, Laura V. Williams, Margaret Landrum, Florence Salzer, Emma 
C. Tucker*, RoxanaH. Oldroyd, Isabella Thoburn, Marjorie A. Dimmitt*, 
Ava Hunt, Lula A. Boles, Margaret Wallace, Ruth C. Manchester.* 

MuzAFFARPUR — Indiana Girls School — Jennie M. Smith.* 

Special Appointment — All India Treasurer — Ethel L. Whiting. 

North India Conference 

Almora — Girls High School — Mathilde R. Moses, Mildred L. Albertson. 

Bareilly — Girls School — Grace Honnell. Babyfold — ^Edna G. Bacon. Clara 
A. Swain Hospital — Bertha A. Chase, M.D., Miriam A. Albertson, M.D. 
Mildred E. Burton, M.D., Theresa Lorenz, R.N., Charlotte Westrup,R.N., 
Alta M. Tucker, R.N.*, A. Janette Crawford. District Evangelist — 
Evelyn Hadden.* 

Bi]NOR— Girls School — Mrs. Bertha Shaw. District Evangelist — Jessie Peters. 

BuDAUN — Girls School — Nellie M. West*, Edna I. Bradley. Training School — ■ 
Ruth Hoath. District Evangelist — ^Phoebe E. Emery. 

Chandag Heights— Leper Work- — ^Mary Reed. 

Chandusi District — Evangelist — ^Eleanor B. Stallard. 

DwARAHAT — Girls School — Charlotte Oram. 

MoRADABAD — Girls School — Anna Blackstock; Primary Boys School — Allie M. 
Bass; District Evangelist — Ruth A. Warrington. 

Naini Tal — Wellesley Girls High School — Ada Marie Kennard, Nora B. 
Waugh. 

Pauri^ — Girls School — Gladys Doyle. 

PiTHORAGARH — Girls School — Ruth M. Cox, Lucy W. Beach. District Evange- 
list—Blanche M. McCartney, Louise M. Perrill.* 

Shahjahanpur — Bidivell Memorial Girls School — ^Yasmin Peters, District 
Evangelist — Ethel M. Calkins, Olive Dunn. 

SiTAPUR — Girls School — Grace M. Bates; Boys School — Vera Parks.* 

Northwest India Conference 

Agra- — District and Village Work- — Sarah C. Holman, Charlotte T. Holman. 
Aligarh — Louisa Soule Girls School — Emma E. Warner*, Ella Perry. District 

Evangelist — Ida A. Farmer. 
Brindaban — Creighton- Freeman Christian Hospital — Rita B. Tower, M.D.*, 

Mary A. Burchard, M.D., Eunice Porter, R.N., Elda M. Barry, R.N.*, 

Hannah C. Gallagher, R.N. 
Bulandshahr — District Evangelist — ^Gertrude E. Richards. 
Delhi — Girls School — Catherine L. Justin. District Evangelist — Ida M. 

Klingeberger. City Evangelist — Margaret Hermiston, Letah Doyle.* 
Ghaziabad — Boys School — Melva A. Livermore, Dr. Lily D. Greene. 
Meerut — Girls High School — Laura Bobenhouse, Jean Bothwell.* Boys 

Primary School — Helen Buss. District Evangelist — Estelle M. Forsyth*, 

Annie S. Winslow. 
*On furlough. 



India 37 

MuzAFFARNAGAR — District Evangelist — To be supplied. 

MussooRiE — Anne E. Lawson. 

MuTTRA — Blackstone Missionary Institute and Girls School— Garnet Everly, 

S. Edith Randall*, Caroline Schaefer, Pearl E. Palmer. 
RooRKEE — Girls School — Carlotta E. Hoffman*, Faith Clark. 

South India Conference 

Bangalore — Balditmi Girls High School — Urdell Montgomery. '^Treasure 

Chest" — Ruth Robinson*, Cora Fales. 
Belgaum — Sherman Girls School and District Evangelistic Work — Elizabeth M. 

Beale. Vanita Vidyalaya and Marathi School — Retta I. Wilson. 
GoKAK — District Evangelistic Work and Girls Boarding School — Emma K. 

Rexroth . 
GuLBARGA — Shanti Sadan Girls School — OUie R. Leavitt. District Evangelistic 

Work and Coeducational School — Julia E. Morrow. Coeducational School 

— Kezia E. Munson*, Ethel C. Wheelock. 
KoLAR — Ellen Thohurn Coiven Memorial Hospital — Esther Shoemaker, M.D., 

Nurses Training School — Anna P. Buyers, R.N.*, Alta Griffin, R.N.* 

Girls High School — Thekla Hoffman, R.N. 
Madras — City Day Schools and Evangelistic Work — Frances E. Johnson. 

Girls Middle School — Joy E. Comstock. 
Raichur — Anna Angel Knight Boarding School — Judith Ericson. 
To Be Appointed — M. Marguerite Rugby. 

BENGAL CONFERENCE 

AsANSOL (Ushagram) — In this "Village for the New Day" six hundred boys 
and girls (including day pupils) "work with their hands as well as with their 
minds, and like it." Some are Hindus, some Mohammedans, some Christians, 
but all have the Indian background that labor is not dignified. The cottage 
system is in use throughout. Several schools in neighboring villages are con- 
ducted by Ushagram pupils after their own school hours, and during vacation, 
thirty-five schools were conducted by volunteers. A normal training course in 
domestic science, recently organized, is the first of its kind in the Province. 

The newest building is the church, simple in style, and a type of archi- 
tecture appreciated by the Indian people. 

The printing-press, operated by the boys themselves, has improved in the 
quality of its work until now the magazine "Ushagram," a highly creditable 
piece of work, is printed on this press. 

Pakur — The Santali school building has contributed greatly towards 
helping the Jidato school fulfil the expectations of its name, — "The village of 
persistent advance." The new chapel, built partly by the gifts of the Swedish 
women of American A-Iethodism, has been named in honor of Miss Pauline 
Grandstrand. 

In the Bengali boarding school, coeducation has been approved of by the 
Government to the extent that the boys have been allowed to sit for the 
Government examinations from a girls school, a concession never heard of 
before. Of the one hundred twenty-six enrolled, fifty-three are boys. A hostel 
for boys, built by local funds, has been erected on the land owned by the Board 
of Foreign Missions. The marked interest of the Hindu women in the com- 
munity, in the meetings of the women's institute, is encouraging. The Govern- 
ment sub-inspector has been so much impressed with the new methods of 
teaching in use here that he has asked help in arranging for a teachers' institute 
on the mission compound, to which all the men teachers of the small village 
day schools in the district are to be invited. 
*0n furlough. 



38 In Lands Ajar 

Educational Work (English) 

Calcutta Girls High School — The enrollment this last year was the largest 
in the history of the school. The inspector of European schools in Bengal 
speaks in his recent report of "the excellent work being done by principal and 
staff, and the careful thought in arranging courses and looking after the 
interests of the pupils." All three candidates for the senior Cambridge exam- 
inations, passed. The lovely spirit and harmony which prevails with so many 
races under one roof, is noteworthy. Of the fourteen children of the fifth 
standard who recently conducted chapel one morning, seven were Jews or 
Parsees. While about one-third of the total enrollment are non-Christians, 
the spirit of the school is such that they cannot go through and not come out 
Christian in outlook. 

Darjeeling — The earthquake of January, 1934, did extensive damage 
to the beautiful building of Mt. Herman School (formerly Queen's Hill). For- 
tunately this took place during the vacation period, when class-rooms were 
unoccupied, so there was no personal injury or loss of life. Through the heroic 
endeavor of the principal. Mrs. Engberg, and her staff, school opened for the 
spring term only ten days late. The Government made a grant of 45,000 
Rupees, gifts were received on the field, and the 1935 New York Branch Thank- 
Offering was designated to complete the restoration of the building which has 
now been re-dedicated, and stands "stronger and better than before, and some 
think, even more beautiful." 

Despite this experience and serious illness in the faculty group, the school 
has had a happy year, and the enrollment, one hundred eighty-six, is larger 
than in years preceding. 

Evangelistic Work 

Evangelistic work on Asansol District is now carried on from the town, 
for greater convenience and efficiency. The district motor car covered 4215 
miles this past year, distributing literature, which is eagerly received, and 
sharing the message with Christians and non-Christians. Another field of work 
is the visiting in the Hindu and Mohammedan homes from which the day 
school children come. 

In the Calcutta Bengali District, the day schools have steadily improved 
in quality. One more school may have to be closed, due to high taxes and lack 
of funds, but it is hoped that these sixty children will not have to be thus 
deprived. 

In the Calcutta Hindustani District, work is carried on among the leather 
workers in the city, about two thousand of whom are working in one section. 

In the Central Hindustani Church there is the small beginning of a mis- 
sionary society which is studying Africa, and is linking up with the Inter- 
national Department of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

Mrs. C. H. Hardie, Official Correspondcvt. 

BOMBAY CONFERENCE 

In response to suggestion from the Society, Bombay Conference has 
made a careful study of its resources and opportunities, and is this year 
reporting some readjustments. Most important of these is at Basim. We 
had there a school with 100 pupils besides a day school, and evangelistic work 
in a large district. But the Nazarene Mission desired to concentrate their 
efforts in the same region, where they had already extensive holdings, and 
offered to buy our property and continue our work. The arrangement was 
duly confirmed by the Society, and the transfer was completed by July 1, 
1935. A few of the girls are moved to other schools, but the majority remain 
in Basim under the new dispensation. Both the missionaries were gieatly 
needed at other places; one has gone to Nagpur, one to Talegaon. The funds 
that had been going to Basim will be used at other places of great opportunity. 



India 39 

In Bombay, tlie gateway to India, one missionary devotes much of her 
time to receiving missionary guests and making their travel arrangements, 
and to making purchases for missionaries up country. The estabUshment 
this year of an inter-mission office in Bombay will relieve her of some of this 
work and give her more time for the supervision of the Gujarati day schools 
and Bible women, her other task. These schools are for Sweeper children, 
legally entitled to a place in the municipal day schools, but kept out by caste 
pressure. Many boys continue through the four grades, but girls are taken 
out early to work and to marry. This year the first little girl, after much 
persuasion of the parents by the missionary, was allowed to stay and graduate. 
The schools are housed in the simplest of buildings, but they have gardens, 
"beauty for ashes." And the teachers and Bible women are living and giving 
real Christianity. 

The two Marathi schools are of the same type. One of them, Mazagaon, 
draws from eighteen blocks of "chawls" (tenements) housing 6 000 people. 
In connection with this school there was opened last year a dispensary and 
welfare center, where with very limited equipment fifty patients receive 
treatment daily. 

In Nagpur, capital of Central Provinces, we maintain a primary and 
middle school of 112 students and a normal school of twenty-three students, 
besides extensive evangelistic work. Last year's graduating class in the 
Normal School all passed the government examinations and are teaching. 
An interesting addition to the curriculum is a class in rural education, empha- 
sizing preparation for work in the villages. The students have opportunity 
for practice teaching in a village day school, and for co-operating with the 
evangelistic missionary in Sunday schools and gospel teams. Last year, five 
of the teachers gave instruction to fifty teachers of the Scottish Mission in 
the use of the Charterhouse course in religious education. 

In Poona, Taylor High School and Anglo-Indian Home continue to 
minister to the neglected Anglo-Indian community. Through government 
grants and pupil fees, these institutions are almost entirely self-supporting. 
The scholastic standard is high, and there is a real religious atmosphere. 

From Poona, too, goes out the Marathi "Woman's Friend," and other 
Marathi literature, original and translated, the work of Miss Abbott. Religious 
workers in many missions are making use of her book list, naming and describ- 
ing books in Marathi available for use with various groups. 

Our Talegaon school has 119 pupils, ninety- two of them boarders. In the 
final examination last year all the candidates passed and one received a prize; 
a splendid record, since a total of 699 candidates sat for this examination and 
only 199 passed. The girls in the final vernacular class are now given a course 
in home economics stressing food values, a balanced diet, and cooking. The 
family system is used, each family having one large room. The Bible teacher 
is a young woman of very fine character and of great influence over the girls, 
and they are showing a steady growth in Christian attainments. 

Puntamba District is rural India in its deepest need. There are 2.000 
village Christians, pathetically eager to learn, and a friendly Hindu com- 
munity, ready to be won if there were the workers. We have a hostel for 
girls, who attend the boys school, a growing medical work, and the beginning 
of a thoroughgoing rural reconstruction program. The aim is, while giving 
them the knowledge of the Christ they long for, to teach them a mode of life 
that will alleviate their grinding poverty without lessening their capacity to 
live simply. Such practical helps are being demonstrated as a chicken coop 
that will protect their baby chicks from crows and cats, and a loom the frame 
of which is made of two sticks, not too large for their tiny houses. Heretofore 
such a population has hardly dreamed of improving itself, but Christ has 
given them hope, and they will rise. 

Mrs. Otis Moore, Official Correspondent. 



40 In Lands Ajar 

CENTRAL PROVINCES CONFERENCE 

Of great interest is the conference-wide development of the Mahila Samiti, 
the church Woman's Society. The Bishop's wife, Mrs. Chitamber, is the 
conference president, and local auxiliaries are encouraged in each station. 
Meetings are held weekly, with a study including temperance and health as 
well as the afTairs of the church. Here follows the conference report for last 
year: 

This year the Jagdalpur District Mahila Samiti has done the best work. 
It has an enrollment of 125 members and has had fifty meetings. Raipur has 
done second best, having raised 115 rupees. The total enrollment is 226. 
Number of presidents, nine. Departments, four. Baby Shows, eight. Temper- 
ance meetings, forty-four. Total dues and receipts, Rs241 (About $80). 

Baihar School is a good experiment station. The family system had been 
installed, but when it was found that the number of small children was pro- 
portionately large and that some of the older girls had gone as far as they could 
in regular school work, a new division was made. There are now two families 
of big and middle-sized girls, and two sections of little ones in charge of older 
girls who are out of school, and who do the cooking, washing, mending and 
sewing. A constant effort is made to prepare the pupils for oidinary living in 
homes. Another new project is the outdoor chapel, set off by hedges from the 
rest of the compound and beautified with flowering vines and shrubs. It is to 
be formally dedicated at district conference time, and will be used for morning 
and evening prayers. 

Jagdalpur, too, furnishes a good background for experimentation, for we 
have things all our own way, being the only mission allowed in the native 
state of Bastar. There is continuous effort to help the people to help them- 
selves. That there is at least some degree of success, these items will show: 
There are three new churches in the district, all built almost entirely through 
the efforts of the people themselves. The percentage of Christian children in 
schools is double that of two years ago. There were 180 children in daily 
vacation Bible schools, and of the twenty workers, seventeen were volunteers. 
There are five Mahila Samitis in the village churches in the district; most of 
the membership is illiterate, but the teachers and wives of the workers are 
helping them to feel that they are a vital part of the church. A pageant, "The 
Spirit of Indian Womanhood" was given by the teachers and girls of Alderman 
School in the State High School assembly hall, their first attempt at such a 
public performance. It was given three times, and raised seventy-five rupees 
for the W. C. T. U. The principal of the school is an Indian woman. The 
little hospital, under an Indian doctor, reports nearly 16,000 treatments, 
mostly outside the hospital. Under its auspices the annual baby show, held 
during district conference, examined the health of seventy-eight babies. 

Johnson Girls High School in Jubbulpore has had to divide five of its 
classes into two sections each, in order to accommodate the increased number 
of students. A Mohammedan gentleman, upon being told that his daughter 
could not be admitted on account of lack of space in the class room, begged 
permission to make a chair and a desk for her, if only she might be permitted 
to come. She came into a real Christian atmosphere. Last year, after the 
visit of the Gospel Team from the Theological College, the Fellowship Groups 
helped to repair, clean and color-wash an old pigeon house, built many years 
ago by the rajah who owned the place, and transformed it into a prayer-room. 
In the domestic science department, courses have been added in child welfare 
and in caring for the sick. A course in Indian music has been put into the 
curriculum, giving this school its place in the growing movement to emphasize 
native arts. One especially interesting event was the inter-school sports meet 
for Indian girls held in our compound and attended by eleven schools. Girls 
in purdah and Christian girls in gym suits all joined in the fun, and a real 



India 41 

feeling of unity was achieved. Speaking of finance, the principal says, "We 
have just been able to weather the year, and we have denied the school all 
but the most urgent needs" — which denying cannot of course be continued 
indefinitely without detriment to plant and equipment. 

The Jubbidpore Mahila Samiti has forty members and is of definite help 
to the evangelistic workers, keeping them in touch with outside women and 
doing volunteer evangelistic work. 

The Training College has an unbroken record of passes in Government 
examinations among its graduates. There is a constant demand for the 
teachers trained here. 

Shortage of missionaries has produced a difificult situation in Khandwa. 
Miss Liers went back from furlough to do evangelistic work on the district, 
but when the Normal School was left without a head, she was obliged to leave 
her villages to care for the school. At the same time there is a large increase of 
interest among non-Christians in the region, a general turning toward Christ, 
which has led a conference of workers from all missions in the area to call for a 
concentration of efTort on the villages. How we do need those new missionaries! 
The school in Khandwa is doing steady, efficient work, pointed directly toward 
the development of Christian character. The Normal School has twenty- 
seven students from seven ditTerent missions, training teachers in the vernacular. 
There is an increase in enrollment in the village schools, with a steady improve- 
ment in the quality of work done. 

In Narsinghpur District, Miss Hulasi Rae, an Indian woman, with a band 
of faithful Bible women, is doing self-efTacing service in visiting homes, helping 
the sick and preaching the Gospel . 

With the closing of the Boys Primary School in Raipur, Stevens Girls 
School opened its two lowest classes to boys, and it was not long until boys 
were found in all the classes. The spirit of change is here too. 

An encouraging word from the report of Raipur evangelistic work: "The 
leaven is working. The results now visible are not so much in open baptisms 
and acknowledgment of Christ, but in changed ideals which are demanding 
a revolution in social customs that will shake the foundations of the old 
religious orthodoxy." 

Mrs. Otis Moore, Official Correspondent. 



GUJARAT CONFERENCE 

Letters from Gujarat Conference in these years say that the difficult task 
of making financial adjustments has brought the members of the conference 
together in a close and unselfish co-operation which has made them "partners 
in the task" as they have never been before. 

Educational Work 

B.A.RODA — Miss Dora Nelson has charge of Wehh Memorial Girls School 
since Miss Challis has gone on furlough. There are about 300 pupils and 
teachers under her supervision. Girls from the school at Godhra come here to 
study English and from several different missions. There are in school four 
Jewish girls, a Parsee, Hindu and even a Mohammedan girl, so the Christian 
influence of this school is far-reaching. 

Godhra — The Normal Training and Practise Schools in Godhra are well 
organized and have an excellent stafT of teachers. The government examina- 
tions are held here with about one hundred girls in attendance from adjoining 
villages. It requires one week to complete the examinations. There are fifty 
normal and 215 practice school girls enrolled in the school. 



42 In Lands JJar 

Evangelistic Work 

Baroda — The work in Gujarati language is carried on by three Bible 
women who visit in the homes and teach three classes in Bible to about 325 
children. Work has opened up among the Marathi people and a Sunday school 
has been opened for them. The work in the city is growing faster than there 
are workers to meet the need. 

Nadiad — The Bible women work among many different kinds of people. 
They meet in a group for prayer and then go out by twos and three to visit 
in different sections of the city. Ahmedabad and Kathiawar Districts were 
under the supervision of our beloved Bessie Rigg who went to her reward 
August 2, 1935. She has made a great impression on the people for Christianity 
because of her victorious Christian life among them. 

Medical Work 

The work of the Mrs. William Butler Memorial Hospital in Baroda has 
been developing and has become an essential part of the church in Gujarat 
Conference and now has eighty beds with fees and donations from the field 
equalling the receipts from the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. The 
Butler Hospital has missed none of its opportunitities in health work, diseases 
of all sorts are much fewer due to the preventive work done as the result of 
the regular examinations of the pupils in our girls schools in Baroda and 
Godhra. Boys are admitted as day pupils and are included in these physical 
examinations. Added to these are the wives and the children of the theological 
students and the small boys from the boys primary school in Godhra. 

Dr. Huffman's work among the wives and children of soldiers in the nearby 
cantonment has opened the way for religious services. It is the only hospital 
between Ajmer and Bombay, a distance of 611 miles, which provides care for 
foreigners. The staff is inadequate, with only one missionary doctor and nurse. 
A competent surgeon is an outstanding need. 

Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, Official Correspondent. 



HYDERABAD CONFERENCE 

In the 1934 report of Hyderabad Conference, we find this significant 
statement : "It is very interesting to watch the progress of the work since 1930. 
In January, 1933, for the first time, the cut of 15 per cent was made in Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society appropriations. The result of this was the dismissal 
of inefficient Bible women and a reduction in the staff of teachers, doubling 
the work of each teacher so that the work did not suffer much. Later, another 
15 per cent cut was made, niakinga total of 30 per cent. At that time salaries 
of all workers including servants were reduced 15 per cent and more workers 
dismissed; consequently, the w^ork did begin to suffer. The boarding schools 
could not admit more students and many congregations in the villages were 
left without instruction. As never before, the matter of self-support began 
to be stressed." 

Educational Work 

BiDAR — The girls school here introduced home economics in its higher 
grades in 1931. In 1932 they received their first government grant. The 
present enrollment is 100 boarders and thirty-five day pupils. There were 
seven girls in the graduating class, four of whom have gone on for higher 
training and three have been married. 

Hyderabad — The Stanley Girls High School has an enrollment of 425, of 
whom 150 are in the boarding department. One of the girls stood first in 
scholarship in the state and was given the Gokhale Scholarship which gives 
her thirty rupees a month for four years of college work and 100 rupees for 
books. The school has been shown great honor because of this scholarship girl. 



India 43 

ViKARABAD — The Mary A. Knotts School began coeducation in 1932 in 
the kindergarten and first and second grades with great success so that in 1934 
it was carried on into the primary and middle grades with Urdu taught as a 
second language. The work of their graduates has shown such marked success 
that the district superintendent recently sent three young men there for 
training. This school has a rural environment and raises much of its own food. 

SiRONCHA — The Frances C. Davis School has eighty-one boarders and 
twenty day pupils. It gets a substantial grant from the British toward its 
expenses. It has been working toward a staff of trained teachers and this goal 
will soon be attained.; 

Evangelistic Work 

BiDAR — Evangelistic work in this district expresses itself in many activi- 
ties; the missionary in charge says: "We made our way to the villages far and 
near, giving Christ's message in the village streets and in the homes of 
Christians and non-Christians. We have shown pictures with our old magic 
lantern illustrating the 'Life of Christ' to crowds ranging from fifty to five 
hundred. We treated 391 cases and derived one tenth of our medical cost in 
fees. We had the fun of directing kitten ball games on Petromax floodlighted 
fields. We taught untrained teachers arithmetic and teaching methods while 
visiting in their villages. We supervised and inspected the schools. In all, we 
have had happy fellowship with our Christians." 

Hyderabad — The Hindustani evangelistic work continues in about forty 
zenanas and a number of schools. One missionary writes "All Moslem work is 
slow in producing outward results. We do find, however, many evidences of 
an increasing tolerance of and interest in Christianity." 

SiRONCHA — Villages are scattered here and there through the jungle in 
this area and where formerly people came only for medicine they now come 
to hear the gospe}s; frequently there have been fifteen hundred assembled to 
hear the messages. 

T.A^NDUR — Regarding this work, a missionary writes: "From our stand- 
point, as we look at the fields, they are ripe unto the harvest. Every village 
we visit gives promise, not only from the low caste people, but from others 
as well." 

Medical Work 

Dr. Stella Dodd, who was transferred to Bowringpet to take charge of the 
tablet industry during Dr. Linn's furlough, had returned to Clason Memorial 
Hospital at intervals to supervise the work. She writes: "I have just recently 
returned from a trip to Sironcha. I go down occasionally to bring up the 
accounts and make the reports and order the medicines and check up on things 
in general. The work has, of course, fallen off a great deal since I left it but 
I again have an Indian doctor on the job and I think it will pick up under her 
direction." 

Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, Official Correspondent. 



INDUS RIVER CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

AjMER — -The Misses Nelson at Avery Girls School, sa.y succinctly: "Most 
of the high points this year have been level, no depressions such as death or 
evil." This school does splendid Girl Guides work. 

The open-air chapel, where vespers are sung, is a new possession at Lahore 
Girls School. They have chosen a new na.me.—Anand Bagh — garden of happi- 
ness. Girls themselves saved Rs. 25 toward the brick flooring of the chapel. 
It is encouraging to note Miss Thomson's training in this direction. There is 
urgent need for more equipment, and opportunity would be doubled if the 



44 In Lands Afar 

school bus could operate to bring in day pupils. Folks of all communities 
already patronize the school and more would come if conveyance were availa- 
ble. A high school department has been opened this year. 

HissAR — This is a school without walls where coeducation is carried into 
the hostel life and the wee boys in their cunning pagarees play with the little 
girls freely. Miss Coy joins the children for Morning Watch at day-break, 
when they gather on a large terrace in the hostel. 

Evangelistic Work 

AjMER District— Miss McLeavey was transferred from Northwest 
India Conference to serve in this district where no woman missionary has been 
for some time. She reports vital interest everywhere among the people and 
progress in the day schools. 

Medical Work 

TiLAUNiA^ — After a season of intermittent medical help, Mary Wilson 
Sanatorium has welcomed Dr. Freda Haffner, though disappointed that she 
must stay at the Sanatorium until a doctor for the institution itself be made 
available, as a full time doctor for itinerant school supervision is much needed. 
Dr. Huffman and Dr. Albertson have been doing valiant substitute duty. 
Miss Bishop has been in charge since Dr. Kipp's early furlough on account of 
ill health. 

Miss Ella M. Watson, Official Correspondent. 

LUC KNOW CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

Arrah — Saivtelle Memorial Girls School is now a full-fledged coeducational 
institution. "Though yet in the experimental stage, we feel assured of its 
success" Miss Tirsgaard writes. The girls hostel is managed on the cottage 
system. Miss Irene Bear is just finishing a first term of six years. 

Cawnpore — Hudson Memorial Girls School reports a class of eighteen 
girls joining the church at Easter, following a revival that grew out of the 
evening prayer circles in the hostel. Miss Richmond is now in charge and Miss 
Tara David has the hostel. 

Miss Edna Hutchens and Miss Adis Robbins are at Girls High School, 
Cawnpore. As usual in India, "high" merely indicates the limit of the classes. 
The children are Anglo-Indian and English with the full percentage of Indian 
students fixed by the educational authorities for European schools. The 
problems of this school and its activities are like no other in North India. 
A fine contribution to the social welfare of a great city is being made by this 
center. Recently upper class girls asked for a prayer room, which was given. 
A few began having bed-time prayers there. Now it is crowded every night. 

GoNDA- — Chambers School, where Miss Eveland and Miss E. Lall are 
serving, reports: "One of.the most interesting and unusual events of the year 
was the marriage in April of a senior teacher to a young Brahman convert, a 
domiciled resident of Fiji where they went as missionaries following the 
wedding. Many Indians live there and most are non-Christian. May 6th we 
celebrated the King's Jubilee. The sports for the four girls schools in the city 
were held at our place. We believe there has never been such a gathering in 
Gonda,|three non-Christian girls schools with us, almost four hundred children 
present." 

MuzAFFARPUR — The earthquake of January 15, 1935, so completely 
wrecked the school at Muzaffarpur that it was decided not to rebuild and the 
girls have been sent to our schools in Arrah and Gonda. Miss Jennie Smith, 
for bravery and leadership in that trying time, was awarded the Kaiser- i-Hind 
Medal in the following New Year's honors. 



India 45 

Lai Bagh Girls High School, inter-conference institution, staffed by 
North India and Lucknow conferences, is the only school in Lucknow for 
Indian Christian girls except a small parish school of primary grades, the only 
girls high school of our church teaching Urdu as the vernacular in the four 
conferences of northern India. It has had to refuse Christian girls of the city 
who could not get in elsewhere and to refuse girls from our own mission because 
of lack of space and scholarships. Only by an increase of fees in the past five 
years has the school been able to carry on work in face of the cuts in mission 
funds and Government grants. Scholarships are the greatest need now, 
because that cut has meant reduced numbers. 

Evangelistic Work 

Arrah District, Buxar Circuit — -Miss Sheldon : "The village schools were 
running so splendidly when I returned from furlough that it was felt we should 
and could give more time to the Mass Movement Christians in the villages 
where schools were already established. Sixty days were spent camping among 
the villagers; still so very Hindu in some of their practices because we have not 
had enough workers to teach them anything else and they know nothing yet 
but their old customs. After staying in each village we called the leaders into 
Buxar for a two-day meeting. They gave their promises to give up all Hindu 
practices, and organized a Brotherhood. It is really the Christian Church. 
It meant also an individual knowledge of sin forgiven, and launching out on 
faith." 

"Efforts are being made here (Muzaffarpur Church and Mohalla) to get 
the church people together again. The earthquake destroyed their building 
and the transfer of the school was very discouraging. Prayers are asked for 
these lonely folk." 

Arrah Circuit — -Miss Hyneman: "Rural reconstruction in the villages 
where we have baptized Christians, which means nominal Christians, has been 
my aim since 1932. So I moved to a village and am living in a house to which 
I feel any of our Christians could aspire. to have. To see the village Christian 
reconstructed we feel he must find God through Christ as his Saviour, learn to 
read, be clean in appearance and in his home and do his best to have good 
health." 

Ballia District — Miss Edna M. Abbott: "New day schools where they 
were thought impossible are now begun. Could open more night schools if 
teachers with day-time work for them, were available. Opposition by land- 
owners and Aryas are still hindrances." 

Miss Ella M. Watson, Official Correspondent. 



NORTH INDIA CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

Almora — Adams Girls High School. Miss Moses and Miss Albertson hold 
a unique position in their community. Unlike most Christian schools more 
than half of its constituency is non-Christian day scholars. Through them the 
influence of the school spreads far. For the King's Jubilee celebrations the 
teachers of Adams were asked to help the staff of non-Christian schools prepare 
their girls. 

B ARIELLY — Aiiss Honnell and Miss Percis Stevens, one of our own mission- 
trained nationals, are at the girls school in Barielh'. 

Warne Baby Fold is unique in that it contributes to all three of our main 
forms of service. Miss Bacon writes that forty-eight girls have taken the 
mothercraft course since July, 1931, which gives practical training to older girls. 

BijN'OR — Mrs. Bertha Shaw, another national, is able to take the place of 
a missionary at Lois Lee Parker School, Bijnor. She writes: "Twenty girls were 



46 In Lands Ajar 

taken into church at Easter. The collection on Children's Day was good, the 
children had earned some of it themselves raising chickens." 

BuDAUN — Miss Crawford is being two people this >ear and is finding life 
strenuous as supply Miss Sahib at Budaiui Girls School during Miss West's 
furlough, while also trying to keep her hand in the office at Clara Swain hospital. 
Budaun School has a large acreage for fields of wheat, mustard and grain, which 
the girls themselves harvest. Miss West has made a paying proposition out of 
the garden. 1 he expenses for food per girl is less in this school than in any other 
of the conferences. 

Miss Hoath is not only in charge of the primary' boys but this year has 
undertaken to be part time District Superintendent and to supervise the boys 
on the upper hostel, pending the arrival of more help. 

Dw.\R.\H.\T — Miss Oram writes of the baptism of a little high caste Hindu 
girl, brought by her father. Two sisters were baptized five years ago and the 
father has always stood by, answering the required questions. Six girls sent up 
for middle examinations all passed, one securing a scholarship and several 
obtaining distinction in one or more subjects. 

MoRADABAD — Miss Anna Blackstock will remain for a seventh year at 
the girls school until some one can take her place . Miss Esther Blackstock has 
the hostel. The fine school building has added immesurably to the moral and 
spiritual life of the girls, to say nothing of the addition to the appearance of the 
compound. 

Miss Bass has returned to take charge of the little boys at Parker Branch 
School, releasing Miss Warrington for district work. Miss Warrington wrote 
before leaving: "I have been with the little boys for four years. We have 
striven to lead the children into a real friendship with Christ and in many 
instances have had gratifying success. Two former boys of ours passed their 
Government High School examinations this year, making us proud of them." 

Pauri — Miss Gladys Doyle writes a moving tale of a little girl brought to 
the mission by a humble grass-cutter mother, years ago and of the child's 
unspoiled pride in returning to that home for her holidays, coming up from 
the plains where she is taking training. Notable because this is a severe test in 
a land where change of place brings out weak spots, just as it does in the West. 

Pithoragarh — Where there used to be at least three missionaries to look 
after the school, woman's home, hospital, babies and evangelistic work at our 
farthest up station. Miss Beach and Miss McCartney, evangelist, now do it 
all with the help of a splendid Indian stalT. The school joined in the Easter 
procession through the town. The women of the Home have set aside their 
best field for the Lord and at the summer festival brought all its growth as an 
offering. 

vShahjahanpur — The activities of girls in this large school, now high school 
for the conference, under the direction of Miss Yasmin Peters, are varied — 
sports, gardens, and social interchange with the boys school. There is a very 
definite evangelistic spirit in the school and the girls are learning to reallj' 
testify to their Christian faith. 

Sitapur — Miss Bates has been at the girls school the past four years. 
Mission Boys School continued to serve a variety of classes, — orphans, children 
of mission workers, and poor Christian families, children from neighboring 
villages where there are no schools, and Hindus and Mohammedans. 

Evangelistic Work 

BijNOR — -"After eleven years of district work it has been an interesting 
experience to return to it again. Work has been reached by train as the Ford 
has at last become obsolete, parts for this model no longer obtainable. Great 
interest on part of Government and other responsible folk in rural uplift," 
writes J.I. Peters. 



India 47 

BuDAUN — Phoebe Emery is a communion steward exemplar — the 
quaintly simple communion sets made from old tobacco tins, now used so 
widely in India's rural communities, her idea. She says she has appointed 
herself chief steward for the district. Nine out of the twelve circuits have 
monthly communion. Miss Emery is being the other half of the district 
superintendent of Buduan District with Miss Hoath— two versatile ladies, 
verily. 

MoRADABAD — Miss Stallard took over from Miss Hardie. Homes are open 
to the Bible women and Miss Stallard believes hundreds of secret believers do 
not yet dare to make open confession. 

Bible Institutes held two times a year in all places where Christians are — 
a pamphlet, "The Steps That Lead to God," written by village women — 
organized temperance work in one hundred village schools. Blanche McCartney 
is diligent in two hill districts to bring about above high spots in a year's tale. 

Medical Work 

Barielly — The days are too short for Dr. Chase and Dr. Albertson at 
Clara Swain Hospital. Miss Westrup returned from furlough and Miss Lorenz 
is busy with her task. 

Chandag — Miss Mary Reed in the far Himalayas, still continues her 
loving mission to the lepers of the hills. 

Miss Ella M. Watson, Official Correspondent. 



NORTHWEST INDIA CONFERENCE 
Educational Work 

Aligarh — Louisa Soule Girls School. A record enrollment in A class this 
year made Miss Perry send a telegram flying to hire an extra teacher. The 
Vocational School was closed last year. These girls are being looked after in 
their own middle or other vocational schools. Several have married. 

Delhi — Miss Justin's school bus has greatly interested the whole con- 
ference. She writes: "If making expenses means it pays, it doesn't, but in 
benefits gained, it does. The bus makes three trips daily accommodating 
forty children living two to six miles away. Saturday evenings an evangelistic 
group goes to a village. Wedding parties, women's meetings and even funerals 
have used it. Yes, it pays." 

Meerut — Miss Bobenhouse at Howard Plested Memorial Girls School has 
written of their crowded conditions — "We could have two seventh classes if 
there were dormitory space. A helpful, five-day series of meetings was held in 
July with Miss Klingeberger as leader." 

Muttra — This year, to relieve crowded conditions at Meerut and to give 
girls in the Normal Classes training in teaching the Bible, the Normal Depart- 
ment was transferred to Muttra as an experiment. Miss Pearl Palmer was 
appointed there on her return from furlough. Miss Randall went on regular 
leave. 

Roorkee — Miss Faith Clarke returned from furlough early in the year, 
and was appointed to Roorkee. Miss Hoffman went on early furlough because 
of ill health. Happy to be back in familiar work, Miss Clark reports a good 
year. 

Ghaziabad — Dr. Lily D. Greene is fortunate to have a Moga-trained 
headmaster for Burgess Day School. This was the first school in Ghaziabad 
to open its doors to all creeds and classes; children from Muslim, Sikh, Hindu 
and Christian homes study together, learning Christian hymns and Bible 



48 In Lands Ajar 

lessons. There is a flourishing junior church. The boys take part of the 
services themselves. At the close each child is given a Bible picture card which 
is afterward found carefully adorning the wall of a mud hut. Some much 
needed new class rooms are being completed. 

Miss Livermore was lent to the Parent Board and has been taking the 
Paces' place at Ingraham Institute, Ghaziabad. She reports a large enrollment 
this year and more non-Christian boys than ever before. The Institute is a 
dividend-earning objective for our loan. 

Meerut — The primary boys schools in the conference were centered at 
Meerut three years ago and Miss Buss is completing her second \ear as manager. 
Under her experienced leadership the school is making visible progress. A 
flourishing Red Cross Society, Temperance Band, and more recently, Scouts, are 
outstanding e.\tra-curricular activities. The little boys join the small girls of 
Howard Plested for junior Sunday school and church, conducting part of each 
service themselves. 

Agra — -Holman Institute, a day school for sweeper children, with an 
industrial department. Miss Sarah Holman comments: "The influence of the 
school on the homes is far reaching." 



Evangelistic Work 

Aligarh District— "Each year shows an improvement in story telling 
and in understanding of Bible teaching. Three months in camp bring me 
nearer the people. Distributed five thousand tracts given by W. C. T. U. Met 
hearty response." — Ida M. Farmer, evangelist. 

BuLANDSHAHR DISTRICT — -Miss G. E. Richards was appointed to this 
district on return from furlough. "We had the largest number of passes in all 
districts, this year. Seven school masters and nineteen Bible readers help me. 
Several village boys have gone to higher shcools on completing the si.\ years of 
village school work; our future leaders." 

Delhi .\nd Rohtak Districts — "In our village work numbers have 
taken a definite stand for the Lord. Others are still afraid to let their belief 
be known. Our scattered groups of Christians have grown in grace." — -Ida M. 
Klingeberger. 

Ghazi.\bad District — "Sometimes my medicine bo.x does yeoman service 
— selling gospels is a 'weight of joy,' one a day is a modest ambition." — Dr. 
Lily D. Greene. 

Meerut District — Miss Forsyth will come on delayed furlough soon. 
She has many interesting stories to tell of individual lads influenced by village 
street preaching, in higher schools now, preparing to be the leaders of tomorrow. 

MuTTRA District — -Miss C. T. Holman has charge of the city evangelistic 
work in Agra. Miss A. Richards, a national, is our only other worker, with 
Bible readers, in all of Muttra District. 



Medical Work 

Brind.\b.\n — Dr. Tower's early furlough left Creighton- Freeman hospital 
temporarily crippled, but now Dr. Burchard has arrived. The new buildings 
are a great satisfaction. Miss Porter will come on furlough when Miss Barry 
returns. 

Miss Ella M. Watson, Official Correspondent. 



India 49 



SOUTH INDIA CONFERENCE 

This conference sustained a great loss when Dr. Margaret Lewis was called 
to her reward July 22, 1934. It was said of her in the 1934 annual report of 
South India Conference, "Dr. Lewis was not only a skilled physician, but she 
was an excellent Bible student. She was a real missionary in every sense of the 
word, 'One sent' to win souls for Christ. Her spiritual life was deep, earnest 
and sincere." 



Educational Work 

Bangalore — The missionary in charge writes: "Happy, mischievous, 
bubbling over spirit of girlhood! It cannot be confined in any report of a 
school's activities. Life in a girls school is full of surprises and so we go on from 
year to year. Studies, games, singing classes, Girl Guides, concerts, camps 
exhibits, — not always 100 per cent success but always 100 per cent will-to-win. 
Glorious glowing girlhood; heavy responsibility, but God carrying always the 
heavy end." 

Belgaum — Vanita Vidalaya has an enrollment of 200 girls and has re- 
ceived permanent government recognition with a small increase in grant; more 
than two-thirds of the students are Hindu and the prayer of the Christians is 
that Christ may bring them into His kingdom. The Marathi Primary School 
has 170 littke folks in it and are having to turn girls away for lack of room. 

Gulbarga — The Shanti Sudan School is much in need of class rooms, for 
during the rainy season, it is necessary for them to hold classes in four difTerent 
languages. Imagine Urdu, Marathi, Gujarati and Telugu, — all within distinct 
hearing distance of one another. 

KoLAR — The Girls High School which was originally a boarding school now 
has more day pupils than boarders with an enrollment of 225 in all departments. 

Madras — The teacher in charge of the Girls Boarding School writes: 
"Many things go on year after year without change in a boarding school, but 
we have had some new experiences during the past year. V\'e reduced the 
number of girls admitted and gave some of our scholarships to places more in 
need so that we should be doing our part in the general effort to reduce expenses 
and conserve funds and we were compensated to our surprise by a remarkable 
increase in day pupils. We now have about three times the number we used to 
consider an ordinary enrollment." 



Evangelistic Work 

KoLAR — It is worthy of note that the students of our Girls High School 
are interested in bringing the gospel to the villages and twice a week go to 
adjoining villages for evangelistic services where they are welcomed gladly. In 
the district work, where the women didn't care to listen to the gospel, they 
now receive it gladly. 

Belg.\um — The Bible women have been faithfully carrying on their work 
during the year as far as can be done with the shortage of workers. A Lingayat 
woman owns a frock factory where many women are working. She gladly 
welcomes the evangelistic workers and invites them to come again. 

GoKj\k — A newly baptized group find much joy in their new experience. 

Gulb.\rga — There has been less touring than usual done in this district 
this year, but there have been many more baptisms — -three whole villages 
besides individuals. 



50 In Larids Ajar 

Madras — Multitudes of people in Madras are really interested in the 
Christian message. A young man who stopped at a street meeting asked to 
speak. He said "I am a Hindu, but niy heart tells me that Christ is the only 
Saviour and he is my God now." 

Medical Work 

The Ellen Thoburn Cowen Memorial Hospital has had a most encouraging 
year with all wards full to overflowing. It needs a doctor who can do eye, ear, 
nose and throat work. 

The preventiv^e medical work carried on through the annual medical 
inspection of the schools since 1929 has been most encouraging. 

The Nurses Training School has a fine staff and good group of students. 
Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, Official Correspondent. 



JAPAN 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

FuKUOKA — Jo Gakko — Yoshi Tokunaga (Principal), Harriet M. Howey, 

Eloise G. Smith, Ella M. Gerrish.* Evangelistic Work — Carolyn M.Teague. 
Hakodate — lai Jo Gakko — Alice Cheney, Gertrude M. Byler, Dora Wagner.* 
HiROSAKi — Jo Gakko — Lois K. Curtice. Evangelistic Work — Erma M. Taylor. 
Kagoshima — Evangelistic Work — L. Alice Finlay. Southern Islands (Loo Choo) 

Evangelistic Work — L. Alice Finlay. 
KuMAMOTO — Evangelistic Work — Mabel Lee, Azalia E. Peet.* 
Nagasaki — Evangelistic and Social Work — Pauline A. Place. Kindergarten 

and Evangelistic Work — Mrs. Toshi Sasamori. Kwassui Jo Gakko — 

Anna Laura White (President), Caroline S. Peckham*, Adelia M. 

Ashbaugh, Helen Couch, Vera J. Fehr, Olive Curry, Olive L Hagen. 
Sapporo — Evangelistic Work — V. Elizabeth Alexander. 
Sendai — Evangelistic and Social Service Work — Elizabeth H. Kilburn- 

Mothers Meetings — Mrs. S. R. Luthy. 
Tokyo — Aoyama Jo Gakuin — Alberta B. Sprowles (Dean), Laura Chase*, 

Barbara M. Bailey, Mary D. Collins. Aoyama Theological School — 

Mary Belle Oldridge.* Woman's Christian College — Myrtle Z. Pider. 

Evangelistic and Social Service Work — Mildred A. Paine, Marian G. 

Simons.* Christian Literature Society — N. Margaret Daniel. Mothers 

Meetings — Mrs. F. W. Heckelman. 
Yokohama — Evangelistic Work — Winifred F. Draper. Literary Work with 

Kagawa Co-operators — Marion R. Draper. 
Chosen District — Evangelistic Work — Bertha F. Starkey, Tsuya Kitajima 

Educational Work 

FuKUOKA — The past year has been unusual in our educational work in 

Japan because of the celebration of three notable anniversaries. One of these 

took place May 18-20, 1935, when Fukuoka Jo Gakko {Happy Hill School) 

-observed the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Many months of planning, of 

"work, worry, washings, wishings", made this a great event. Fifty years ago, 

*On furlough. 



"Japan 5 1 

a small group of timid little girls were gathered in the home of an American 
missionary. Now there is a capacity attendance of 400 fine girls who have 
passed the competitive examination for entrance, a faculty of twenty-one 
members, with Miss Tokunaga, a dignified Japanese woman, as principal, and 
a group of buildings worthy of our Society. The teachings of Jesus are permeat- 
ing the lives of these girls. "They think in world terms and look one straight 
in the face as they swing along in their uniforms." The school now has the 
confidence, trust and respect of the city and state. 

Hakodate — lai Jo Gakko {Memorial Love Girls School) is set in the midst 
of the busy, materially-minded port city of Hakodave on Hokkaido, the big 
north island of Japan. We shall not soon forget the great fire of March 1934, 
which swept over the city. A missionary, returning in June, 1935, writes: 
"I am still wondering how so much of the city could burn, how the little that 
was left could include the Methodist Church, the Girls School and the two 
kindergartens. But it did. We have a day nursery in the barracks district and 
around it have grown Christian activities for school boys and girls and for the 
adults of the barracks who lost everything in the fire." Our school has been a 
social centre of relief and service since the night of the lire. Dora Wagner so 
splendidly directed the work that she was presented a gold medal by govern- 
ment officials when she left recently on furlough. 

With the Skeer bequest a new chapel building seating six hundred fifty 
has been built. The former chapel has been converted into two good class 
rooms and a fine science room. 

Miss Alice Cheney, who for ten years was principal, is happy in the choice 
of her successor, Mr. Xobuyoshi Obata, the new principal. He is a graduate of 
the Tokyo Imperial University, was for seven years national student secretary 
of the Y.M.C.A., and has for the past ten years been on the faculty of Aoyama 
Gakuin. 

HiROSAKi — In addition to the three anniversaries mentioned abov^e, plans 
are being made for a fourth. It will be fifty years next June since Hirosaki Jo 
Gakko was founded, not in an educational and cultural centre, but in a very 
conservative farming centre, in a province known as about the poorest in the 
country. An international committee composed of twenty girls is an interesting 
feature in connection with the school, and local newspapers have given them 
prominence. They have had some correspondence with India and an exchange 
of interesting things. A class in home economics is making Japanese cook 
books in English, to be illustrated, and after exhibiting them at the fiftieth 
anniversary next year, they will send them to other countries asking for an 
exchange of recipes. 

Nagasaki — Kwassui Jo Gakko {High School). Our fiftieth anniversary 
celebration five years ago seemed to waken the city of Nagasaki to what we 
have been, and are, doing. We have been growing increasingly popular in spite 
of the strong nationalistic spirit which makes many suspicious of Christianity. 
The school is full to overflowing. 

Tokyo — Aoyama Jo Gakuin, founded November 16, 1874, after sixty, 
years of significant service numbers her graduate body at 3621. The mind is 
lost in a maze as one attempts to consider the Christian influences which flow 
through these channels from this one institution. The anniversary of its 
founding was fittingly observed. 

In the past four years, the number of new applicants has increased from 
781 to 1102, while only 200 can be accepted. The registration is limited by the 
Government to 1000 for high school and 200 for home economics. 

The development of the home economics department is one of the out- 
standing achievements of the recent years. Its beginning dates back to the 
industrial school founded by Miss Ella Blackstock in 1889, and united with 



52 In Lands Afar 

Aoyama Jo Gakuin in 1914. In 1932, the ultimate aim of the founder to make a 
normal course in home economics was realized, and since then teachers' licenses 
are granted by the Education Department of the Government. 



Social and Evangelistic Work 

FuKUOKA — -In this city and outlying districts, Carolyn Teague and five 
national workers conduct classes for the factory girls, for nurses, business girls 
and girls of the leisure or upper middle class, as well as work with the pre-.school 
age children (forty of them) and their mothers and fathers, and weekly Bible 
schools for the primary group. During the last four years more than one 
hundred business girls have enrolled for Bible study, and more than ninety 
have accepted C-hrist. 

The rural work goes out among the folk in eighteen small villages. In the 
Spring, health clinics were conducted in Itoshima County. Two doctors from 
the children's department of the Imperial University Hospital gave their 
services free. These are not just health clinics for the body, but the mothers are 
reached with the message of love and goodwill. Money is needed for a fine 
Christian nurse. Last year, the farmers of Itoshima County lost 84 per cent of 
their rice crops, and rice is both a source of income and the food for the farming 
population of 55,000 people. The girls of Happy Hill School, Fukuoka, through 
their social service department helped the local pastor, Mr. Utsimi, to give his 
people a wonderful White Christmas. Many of them learned to know a Father 
who loves them when the rice fails. Day nurseries for the farmers' children are 
held during the rice transplanting season, funds for this purpose being furnished 
by the Y. W. C. A. of Kwassui College and Fukuoka Girls School. 

HiROSAKi — Hirosaki Girls School helps to carry on a day nursery in the 
village of Dake, where farming is difficult and where there has been famine for 
two or three years. A teacher from their own day nursery takes charge of more 
than twenty nursery children in a building which should be used for grain. It 
is a pretty poor place and very dark on a cloudy day, but they have managed to 
make it do. Erma Taylpr has returned after a prolonged furlough to superin- 
tend the evangelistic work. 

Kagoshima — Among the many duties which belong to Alice Finlay one is 
that of superintending the kindergarten of seventy children. Through the 
efforts of the fathers and mothers, together with help from friends in America, 
a much needed addition to the playground has been secured. 

Three years ago Miss Peet with the help of Japanese teachers began a 
nursery school for farmers' children, which has continued each year with 
growing success. This is held during the rainy season in June when the farmers 
plant their rice. The little ones are taken care of While fathers and mothers 
work early and late in the paddy fields. This year there were eighty of these 
children 

KuMAMOTO^Miss Peet writes: "The Kumamoto station is again open 
For three years while no missionary was resident, the ceilings fell, the paint 
cracked, the curtains hung in shreds, but worse; the work also was at a stand- 
still. In the l,ast eighteen months the Oe Kwan, as we call the mission home, 
has become a beehive of activities for men, women and children. The kinder- 
garten building has been in constant use not only for kindergarten purposes 
but also for other social and religious activities. Regular work has been re- 
sumed in three large towns on the district and a most promising work has been 
begun in a fourth." The missionary has her home with eight Japanese co- 
workers and the family life has be^ one of the happiest parts of the work of 
the Kumamoto station. 

Nagasaki — The Melton-Young Memorial Home is an evangelistic-social 
.centre by the sea of a port city of 200,000 people. It was bought in July, 1933, 



Japan 53 

largely through the gifts of friends, in memory of Miss Mary Melton and Miss 
Mariana Young, two dear friends who worked together in Kwassui College 
for years. Miss Young passed on in 1932, one month before the present home 
was purchased. Nagasaki has had Methodist churches and schools for fifty 
years, and this home gives an opportunity for service to a class that has been 
neglected. The large rooms and playground are in constant use in the name of 
Christ, for classes of mothers, working girls, working boys, government school 
students and children of all ages. Among the needy groups are the 1000 
Koreans, for whom this is the only meeting place. Our children's classes are 
many, varying in ages from three to eighteen. We give much attention to 
religious work, international good will, temperance and health. Our library 
is most popular though we have but 160 books. It is open on all days when we 
hold classes. Children's libraries are most unusual here, and we feel a great 
need for them. 

The clinic and kindergarten are ten years old, but in the past four years 
the work has grown in numbers and in activities. A visiting nurse has been 
added and another kindgergarten purchased in another section of the city. 
For the latter property the mothers gave 7000 yen, which they had collected 
and worked for, for ten years. 

The Joen, or girls home, a work which has been carried on for forty years 
was discontinued, and a social centre which is almost entirely self supporting, 
namely, the clinic, was begun. Money is collected from all classes of people, 
both Christian and non-Christian, because it makes a big appeal. 

Miss Pauline Place returns home this year after a very busy six-year period 
of service. 

Sapporo — Of this piece of evangelistic work Miss V. Elizabeth .Alexander 
writes: "To cover the work of four years in a few words is not easy, but perhaps 
the one thing that impresses me most is the way that the Japanese pastors in 
the little country churches have carried on, without any financial help from 
the Board of Foreign Missions. How they manage to live on their salary is a 
mystery. 

"My work is in the woman's meetings in the various churches on the 
district. These women make our engagements for the meeting, lead the service 
and attend to the business. My part is to give the Bible lesson. With the 
help of my co-worker, we carry on seven children's meetings, and a club for 
the bigger girls meets twice a month." 

Send.aj — When Miss Kilburn and Miss Lee were appointed to Sendai, 
eight years ago, they felt it wise to build up the work in such a way that it 
could eventually be handed over to the supervision of the Japanese leaders. 
The kindergarten and dormitory work, the women's organizations and social 
work were all organized under the church with that in view. We have a small 
but well organized and financially independent church. Even the Bible class 
for Government College girk is a part of the church school. 

In 1933 the W. F. M S. took action to turn over to the Japan Methodist 
Church, for the use of the Sendai Church, the entire present property. How- 
ever, it seemed more practical to accept an offer of the Imperial Railway Com- 
pany to buy the W. F. M. S. property and keep the present church lot, procur- 
ing some adjoining land. The kindergarten and dormitory buildings have been 
moved to the new lot. The parsonage will be rebuilt and the church repaired. 
Our old missionary home is being usedbythe railway hospital as a separate ward. 
Miss Kilburn is living in a new Japanese house near the kindergarten. 

Because of lack of funds, only one worker has been available for the district 
work in four provinces. Officials have asked the pastor to open nurseries in 
ten villages. He said, "We cannot refuse, though I may have to sell everything 
I have in the world. An opportunity like this will never come again." Earlier 
Dr. Kagawa had urged just such a move to help stem the tide of the religion, 
"Hito no Michi," which deifies the Emperor and makes bigoted nationalists 



54 In Lands Afar 

of the people. Funds were available for six villages and mighty prayers are 
ascending for further aid. 

Tokyo — -Ai Kei Gakuin is one of the five units of social work in Tokyo 
related to the Japan Methodist Church. The other four units have Canadian 
backing. The W. F. M. S. has approved the organization of an Ai Kei Zaidan 
Hojin, as a legal property holding organization, which frees our representatives 
to work together with the other members of the Social Service Federation. 

A new kindergarten plant has been erected with equipment for living 
quarters on the second floor and other rooms for children's purposes. Under 
the splendid leadership of Mildred A. Paine and Marian G. Simons it is a busy 
place from the beginning to the end of the week, with classes for all from the 
tiny tots to the policemen, who "want to learn more about this religion which 
makes people not afraid at any time to meet whatever happens to them." 
A bi-monthly Well-Baby Clinic is conducted by Dr. Saito of St. Luke's 
Hospital, who is a Harvard graduate. 

Mrs. W. S. Mitchell, Official Correspondent. 

KOREA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

Chemulpo — Citv and District Day Schools — Maude V. Trissell, Jeanette 
Oldfather.* Public Health and Welfare Work^'Q. Alfreda Kostrup, R.N. 
Evangelistic Work — Margaret I. Hess. 

Haiju — Evangelistic Work — Jane Barlow, Pearl Lund. City Day School — 
Pearl Lund. 

Chinan — District Evangelistic and Day Schools — Blanche R. Bair. 

HoNGSUNG — Evangelistic and Educational Work — -Hanna Scharpff. 

Kangneung — Evangelistic and Educational Work — -Mrs. Louise O. Morris. 

KoNGju — City Schools — Mrs. Lillian M. Swearer. Evangelistic and District 
Day Schools — Mrs. Alice H. Sharp. Public Hygiene and Infant Welfare 
Work—Maxftn P. Bording, R.N. 

Pyengyang — Chung Eui Higher Common School— Ada. McQuie, Esther L. 
Hulbert, Helen E. Boyles, Grace L. Dillingham.* City and District Day 
Schools — Helen E. Boyles. Blind School and New Jersey Conference Bible 
Training School — Henrietta P. Robbins. Union Christian Hospital — - 
N. Bernita Block, M.D., A. Evelyn Leadbeater, M.D.*, Naomi Anderson, 
R.N., Ethel H. Butts, R.N., Zola L. Payne, R.N. Traveling Dispensary- 
Mary M. Cutler, M.D. (Retired on the field.) Evangelistic Work, East 
and West Districts — Emily Irene Haynes.* 

Seoul — Ewha College — Alice R. Appenzeller (President), L. Catherine Baker, 
Marion L. Conrow, Ada B. Hall, Jeannette C. Hulbert, Harriet P. Morris, 
Blanche H. Loucks, Grace H. Wood*, Moneta Tro.xel, Myrta O. Shaver, 
Mary E. Young. Ewha High School — Marie E. Church.* City and District 
Day Schools — Maude V. Trissell. District Evangelistic Work — Jessie B. 
Marker. Lillian Harris Memorial Hospital — Elizabeth R. Roberts, R.N. 
Medical Education — Rosetta S. Hall, M.D.* Social Evangelistic Ce?iter — 
Elma T. Rosenberger.* Methodist Theological Seminary — Anna B. Chafifin. 

SuwoN — Evangelistic and Educational Work — Lulu A. Miller. 

WONGju — Evangelistic and Kindergarten Work — Mrs. Louise O. Morris. 
Evangelistic and Social Service Work — Esther J. Laird. 

Yengby'en — Evangelistic Work — Ethel Miller. Educational Work — Elsie N. 
Banning, L. lielle Overman.* 

YiCHUN — Evangelistic and Educational Work — Gertrude E. Snavely. 
*On furlough. 



Korea 55 

KOREA 

Four really significant events fall within the scope of this report of the 
last four years. In 1933 a thorough-going scientific study and revaluation of 
all our work was carried on under the direction of a representative committee, 
and participated in by every preacher, Bible woman and missionary in the 
Korean Methodist Church, and also a large group of laymen. This resulted in 
the adjustment of support between types of work and between institutions of 
the same type, bringing the iotal to balance the appropriations as cut by 30 
per cent. It also provided for the withdrawal of mission support from unregis- 
tered primary schools at the end of two years and the shifting of support by 
the Society to the local church, of kindergartens and Bible women at the rate 
of 10 per cent per year for ten years. 

The second General Conference of the Korean Methodist Church, held 
in the fall of 1934, is the second of the significant events of the years under 
review. After a trial period of four years of the plans effected w^hen the church 
was set up, it was found wise to make some changes. The plan for carrying on 
w'ork for women throughout the districts proposed by the Revaluation Com- 
mittee, and approved in principle by the missionaries and the Central Council 
was integrated with the church machinery as a "Woman's Work Section" and 
placed under the Department of Evangelism of the General Board of the 
Church. The organization goes down to Districts and is representative. There 
are five divisions of work including evangelism, religious education, kinder- 
garten supervision, public health, and home economics and club \\:ork. This 
plan will not become really operative until April, 1936, though nine Korean 
women were placed on districts this year with funds already conserved — 
probably a premature trial of a plan illy understood by anyone and involving 
workers entirely unprepared for the plan. One, in writing about it, says, "I 
think we can build up this year an appreciation of what it means to work for 
an organization which is a part of the church and which should be in itself a 
sisterhood comparable to the W. F. M. S. 

Dr. R. S. Ryang, who through the first four years of the new church proved 
to be a fine administrator and leader for all of its interests, was re-elected for a 
second term as General Superintendent. 

The third important event to be noted is the 50th anniversary of the 
coming of Christian missionaries to the Hermit Nation. The H. G. Appen- 
zellers, Methodists, and H. G. Underwood, Presbyterian, landed on Easter 
Sunday morning, 1884. What God hath wrought through them and those who 
have followed in their train is a story that no one can fully tell, but there aie 
certain tangible results in which we are personally deeply concerned. Much 
of credit and praise for what has been accomplished in permeating the country 
with the Christian message is due to the institutions where our Bible women 
and other workers are trained and those who go out from them to work in the 
churches. One of these is the Bible Training School, in Pyengyang, whose 
principal. Miss Henrietta Robbins, is now on furlough. The other is the Union 
Seminary in Seoul. Mrs. Chafifin, principal for many years, is also on furlough. 
The experiment of coeducational work there with one course of study for men 
and women has proven impracticable. Before the beginning of another year 
some other plan will be worked out for the training of women for full time 
service in the church. Ten other missionaries share in the labors of the Bible 
women in the supervision of their work on the districts. Theirs, very largely, 
will be the responsible task of making the new plan under the woman's work 
section a success. They, who have achieved so much under the old order, 
should be most effective in making the transition to one that should more 
nearly meet the needs of rapidly changing conditions. The Society is now 
maintaining two highly qualified young women who serve under the Board of 
Education of the Church — Pauline Kim, and MivSS Chang. Miss Kim's depart- 
ment is children's work. She is creating the Sunday school lessons for little 



56 /w Lands Ajar 

children. Miss Chang has charge of the Home's Departrnent. Both are doing 
editorial work, and both are giving large service to classes, institutes and the 
like throughout the church. 

Medical service was one of the first to be established by the pioneers. A 
later development was a womans hospital, the first in Korea for women. Lillian 
Flarris Memorial, or more familiarly known as East Gate Hospital, continues,, 
under Dr. Ahn and Nurse Elizabeth Roberts, to serve a large number of women. 
The number of babies born there this year will easily reach the 800 estimate. 

The Union Christian Hospital in Pyenyang reports the largest business in 
its history in number of patients and also in local income in spite of the fact 
that 22 per cent of all the work has been free work. There has been a constant 
waiting list for beds. The clinic work has been very heavy. A staff of eleven 
doctors has been kept busy with a total of 77,000 visits. Dr. Bernita Block and 
three nurses, the Misses Anderson, Butts and Payne have served most effi- 
ciently in their several capacities. Dr. Leadbeater has been on furlough. 

Public Health and Child Welfare work is carried on here and in three other 
centers where it has reached a high degree of development. Alfreda Kostrup 
with a stafT of Korean workers at Chemulpo in a neat new building is giving a 
beautiful and effective service to the community. Maren Bording's work at 
Kongju is so well-known and highly esteemed in the Empire, that it has been 
used by other denominations as a training center for their workers. At the 
insistence of Japanese official families who were appreciative and supporting 
patrons, a branch has been opened in Taiden, a growing thriving city to which 
the Provincial government offices have recently been moved from Kongju. 
The one and one-quarter million inhabitants of this Province consume less 
than one glass of milk each per year. 

Elma Rosenberger is our representative in the Social Evangelistic Center 
in Seoul. Her department is Public Health and Child Welfare. A group of 
Korean women are working hard to complete a fund for a child welfare "building. 
One, now enlightened, woman who lost two beautiful children through igno- 
rance, has written a book entitled "From a Mother to Mothers" and is going 
to give the proceeds of its sale toward the building. 

Fifty years ago there was not a school of any kind in Korea for girls. It 
was the blessed privilege and significant accomplishment of Mrs. Scranton, our 
first missionary to that land, to found the first one, which was Ewha. Through 
the years many others were started and developed. The Government school 
provision is not yet adequate. Furthermore the value of these Christian 
schools (from the many primary schools to college) is highly appreciated by 
Korean Christians — so much so that they decided that one of the best ways to 
celebrate the coming of missionaries to Korea was to make permanent the 
schools they planted. A degree of success has already been achieved. The 
wealthiest man in Yang Byen, a non-Christian, has given half of all that he 
possessed, and the local government physician, who is a Christian and a 
member of the school governing board has made a gift of 5,000 Yen. In this 
school the high school courses are carried for both girls and boys. Elsie 
Banning, teacher of English and music, is our representative. Two years ago 
our girls school at Kongju entered upon a new regime becoming affiliated with 
the boys school for more practical training There is a two year course which 
includes domestic science and arts, gardening, seri-culture, animal husbandry, 
etc. Since Mrs. Swearer's departure for retirement we have had no teacher in 
this school. Chung Eui, our high school in Pyengyang, under the administra- 
tion of Ada McQuie with the Misses Hulbert and Boyles and a corps of Korean 
teachers, serves our Methodist territory in the north. Nearly 350 girls study 
there, one-third of whom come from the villages and live in the hostels. Ewha 
High School, in Seoul, has more than 300 students, four-fifths of whom live in 
Seoul. Miss Church, principal and the only foreign teacher, was on furlough 
last year. During her absence, Mr. Henry Appenzeller was good enough to 



Malaya 57 

•add Ewha to his heavy responsibilities at Pai Chai, the big school for boys, 
founded by his father at the same time. We are much indebted to him for this 
service. 

The church has passed through many trying and testing experiences in 
these four years. On the other hand, the spirit of loyalty, devotion and sacrifice 
is everywhere demonstrated in many ways. Teachers assume larger responsi- 
bilities and give liberally toward endowment funds. When Bible women or 
district workers have to be dropped for lack of funds, "local women without 
any special training or equipmefit, but with a mighty faith, go out to the 
villages to preach what they know, aided by the tracts I have given them." 
The appeal for support of the mission work of the church in Manchuria resulted 
in great giving and greater blessing. With Dr. Ryang, we can truly say, "We 
believe not only in the good that has been, but t le greater good that is yet 
to be." 

Mrs. J. M. Avann, Official Correspondent. 



MALAYA CONFERENCE 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

Ipoh — Anglo-Chinese Girls School — -Thirza E. Bunce, Gazelle Traeger.* 
Kuala LxJUWR^Methodist Girls ^cAoo/— Mabel Marsh. Holt Hall — Emma 

Olson. 
Malacca — Suydam Girls School — Marion D. Royce. Shellabear Hall — Eva 

Sadler. 
Pen.-vng — Lindsay Girls School — -C. Lois Rea. Winchell Home — Norma 

Craven, Lydia Urech.* 
SiNG.'VPORE — Methodist Girls School — -Lila M. Corbett. Eveland Seminary — 

Ruth M. Harvey.* Nind Home — Minnie L. Rank. Fairfield Girls School 

— Carrie Kenyon, Mary E. Olson.* Woman's Work — C. Ethel Jackson, 

Martha Gertsch. 
Sitiawan — Methodist Girls School — Mechteld D. Dirksen. 
Ta,iping — Lady Treacher Girls School — Delia Olson. Crandon Home — Ada 

E. Pugh. 

MALAYA CONFERENCE 

The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society began its work in Malaya in 
1887 under the leadership of Mrs. Nind of the Minneapolis Branch and her 
historic words "Frozen Minnesota will one day pl^nt a mission on the Equator" 
have had a glorious fulfillment. There are seven day schools in the peninsula 
and with boarding schools there is an enrollment of 3719 girls. 

The fiftieth anniversary of the beginning of the mission was celebrated in 
1934 with its beloved founder, Bishop Oldham. An honored guest was Miss 
Sophia Blackmore of Australia, the first missionary to Malaya under our 
Society. 

The Methodist Girls School in Singapore has grown from nine girls in 1887 
to 763. Historic Nind Home, which crowns the summit of Mt. Sophia is the 
Mecca for visitors, and the school and hostel provide always a scene of great 
activity. A new building to house the school has long been a necessity, but 
owing to financial conditions could not be realized. Plans are made to celebrate 
the fiftieth anniversary of the work of the Society by the completion of this 
project. Fairfield School, with its over 500 girls is to be a part of the Methodist 
-.Girls School and under its supervision in its separate location. 
*On furlough. 



58 In Lands Afar 

Fairfield School under the wise care of Miss Mary Olson has had a tine 
year with an enroUnient of 530 and a staff of twenty teachers. 

Eveland Seminary on Mt. Sophia has had sixteen girls the past year. Girls 
from all the stations come here to be trained. They are assistant principals, 
teachers, conducting Sunday schools among the children of ricksha pullers, and 
helping to take care of the Nind Home girls. 

They have produced curriculum material to be used in daily vacation 
Bible schools and have carried on these schools with the help of local leaders. 
The Epworth Leagues find their officers among Eveland student girls. This 
combined with instruction given to make them homemakers develops a well 
rounded life in each girl. 

Malacca — As one enters the gates of Bickley Park compound it presents 
an orderly and beautiful scene. On the right hand are the buildings of the 
Board of Foreign Missions and on the left the attractive new Stiydam Girls 
School with its assembly hall and Shellabear Hall with its girls of different 
nationalities living and working together. Miss Delia Olson gave ten years to 
the development of this school and has had a most successful and fruitful 
tenure. 

The Sunday school has an average enrollment of 195 and has given $30. 
to missionary work. 

Kuala Lumpur — This is a forward looking and beautiful city with its 
modern buildings and healthful surroundings. The girls school throngs with 
young people of all nationalities. Mrs. Yap has given great help and inspiration 
through the ministry of music. An interesting organization is the Old Girls 
Association, which gives entertainments which wins the approval of the Sultan 
and incidentally of residents. One girl, Wong Chiew Wan, a Junior Cambridge 
girl, has a pilot's license and is the first Asiatic woman in Malaya to receive 
this distinction. 

The girls boarding school outgrew its quarters and has moved into a 
beautiful building which is owned by Mrs. Lo Kew who was a student in the 
school. It is large enough to admit Tamil and Chinese girls and under the wise 
leadership of Miss Emma Olson will prove a great blessing to the community 

Ipoh — The Anglo- Chinese Girls School was opened in 1897 and has had a 
steady growth until now. The enrollment is over 400. Their school buildings, 
which were largely financed by the community and the British Government, 
as well as by our Society, are beautiful and adequate. The missionary residence 
was erected in 1933 and is situated in a large compound. Space for athletics 
gives a fine opportunity for the development of Christian womanhood. 

All the teachers are baptized Christians and of the 425 students 32 per 
cent are Christian. 

SiTiAWAN — The enrollment is not large, but fifty of the children are from 
Christian homes. Miss Dirksen is happy to have a new clinic building where 
she ministers to throngs of people. Her visits to the little villages on the rubber 
plantations are eagerly anticipated, and the sound of her car the signal for the 
road to belinedwith people with upraised handsand medicinebottlestobe filled. 

Taiping — Crandon Home is now a self-supporting institution with a small 
enrollment, but there is promise of growth. All funds from home are withdrawn 
and the year was ended without a debt. 

The Lady Treacher Girls School has had a good year, although affected by 
financial conditions. 

Penang — The Anglo- Chinese Girls School has 600 girls enrolled. Because 
of lack of room only one chapel service a week is held. Special meetings during 
the week of prayer resulted in definite decisions of 130. 

Winchell Home must soon have a new building as it has been condemned 
by the Government. Training for leadership forms a large part of the life of 
the home. Girls from Sumatra have enrolled and are very helpful in school and 
church activities. 



Philippine Islands 59 

Evangelistic Work — In every station much attention is given to 
spititual instruction. The girls join in this work with the older missionaries 
and go out as parish visitors and as workers in the church and Sunday schools. 
Miss Jackson gives herself without reserve to the young people, both boys and 
^irls, and seeks to win their confidence that she may lead them to Christ. 

Mrs. C. C. Peale, Official Correspondent. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS CONFERENCE 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

LiNGAYEN — Mary Brown Townsend Memorial Bible Training School — Miss 

Mary Evans, Mildred Blakeley.* 
Manila — Harris Memorial Bible Training School — Marguerite M. Decker, 

Marguerite E. Hewson. Hugh Wilson Hall (To be supplied.) Mary J. 

Johnston Hospital — Mary L. Deam, Anna J. Carson, Bertha Odee, 

Henrietta Doltz.* 
San Fernando — Edna Thomas Memorial Hall — Marion Walker, Leila V. 

Dingle*, Hazel Davis.* 
Tuguegaro — District Evangelistic Work — Armenia Thompson, Virginia 

Hayes.* 
Bayombong — Nuera Viscaya — Wilhelmina Erbst. 
ViGAN — Ruth Atkins. 

The conditions surrounding our work and workers in the Philippine 
Islands in the past few years have placed a burden on the hearts of our mis- 
sionaries which has made the work exceedingly hard. Out of it all has come a 
renewing of religious life, and a loyalty and devotion to Christ and his Church 
■expressed in the gaining of over 6000 new members. 

The loss of four missionaries made readjustments necessary with a reduced 
staff. The work has gone forward and the return of Misses Odee, Thompson 
.and Atkins has helped greatly. 

Manila — Harris Memorial Training School — Twelve provinces are repre- 
sented in the student family, including one bright Igorot girl from the mountain 
province. This year we have our first candidate for the deaconess course from 
faraway Sumatra. Enrollment 1934-1935, is fifty-eight. This does not include 
the self-supporting day-pupils nor the twenty-five children in the kindergarten 
department. 

Twenty Junior Leagues and sixteen Sunday schools serve as a laboratory 
or practice-field for students to apply the teachings received in the class room. 
This is carefully supervised by one of our graduates who has shown marked 
fitness for the work. 

A new feature is being tried which seems to be satisfactory. The middle 
year students are spending a year at the Mary J. Johnston Hospital to have 
some training in the care of the sick which they can use to advantage in the 
stations where they are assigned. Miss Williams, of the Ellinwood School is one 
of the Bible teachers. 

Mary J. Johnston Hospital and Nurses Training School — On a busy street 
overlooking Manila Bay this institution is a refuge for the sick, the birth place 
of hundreds of little brown babies, and a clearing house for troubled souls. 
In 1908, the corner stone was laid by Bishops Oldham and Robinson and the 
present building completed. In 1911, a disastrous fire occurred, and it had 
.to be rebuilt. It was enlarged by the addition of a nurses' dormitory. Later the 

*On furlough. 



60 In Lands Afar 

Masonic Lodge supported a ward for crippled children and this year built a sun 
porch where the children can be in the lovely tropical sunshine. In 1932, money 
from the Edith Gale bequest through the Harris family was given to build the 
new nurses home acioss the street called Eveland Hall, and presided over by 
Miss Carson. This year more money was available and the hospital was 
thoroughly repaired in time to meet the great typhoon which otherwise might 
have wrecked it completely. 

While it is a maternity hospital, the medical and surgical department has 
been growing and 378 women were cared for in this way. The increase in 
surgical cases was 164 over the previous year. The number of babies born this 
year was 459, making a grand total in twenty-eight years of 13,700. The total 
receipts from all sources was $68,966.50 which left a balance of $2315.68. 

In the Nurses Training School three years of intensive training is required 
and 284 have gone out into different walks of life. The requirements are higher 
here than in any other country because of American influence. F"ifty-four are 
now in training. 

Hugh Wilson Hall — This institution is making good progress despite 
the fact that it must compete with many dormitories. As it is so near the 
Central Methodist Church, it is used frequently for social affairs for the young 
people and is a place for the meeting together of young men and women under 
careful supervision. They now have forty-two girls and prospects for more. 
Twenty-five are freshman girls and Methodists and their parents feel that 
Hugh \Vilson Hall gives them the protection needed. Many of them are in the 
choir of Central Church. Mrs. Sylvia Barnes Thomas has been in charge and 
has given valuable service in music and teaching. 

Mary Brown Townseiid Memorial Bible Training School — In the absence 
of Miss Blakeley on furlough, Miss Silveria Lucas was appointed to take her 
place. She is a well-trained Filipina teacher and deeply consecrated. A dis- 
astrous flood did great damage to the beautiful grounds and buildings, but 
with courage they are facing the future. 

The graduates from this school are all at work and are especially valuable 
pastors in training the children. 

A splendid inter-district evangelistic institute was held at Lingayen with 
sixty-one students. It is a fine opportunity to train volunteer women workers. 

San Fernando — This station was also in the flood but Miss Walker used 
the need of living close together for a study course with the fifteen future 
Deaconesses. A meeting of the daily vacation Bible school institute teachers 
was held recently and representatives from three provinces were present. 

ViGAN Illocos Sur — A dormitory under the charge of Miss Lara is 
developing Christian leadership in this province. Miss Evans oversees the work 
and has a large field to travel as she lives in Lingayen. 

Bayombong — Miss Erbst is in charge and travels on horse back through 
flooded sections to visit her people. 

It is a large district and needs more than one missionary to care for all its 
interests. But a growing Church is evolving, and the young psople crowd the 
little chapel built near the home of the missionary and respond to the appeals 
made to follow Christ. The Cagayan valley is beautiful and one day will be the 
place for colonization when the Filipinos have worked out their plans for 
independence. 

TuGUEGARAO — This station is far removed not alone by miles, but by the 
forces of nature, — large rivers, landslides and typhoons. Miss Virginia Hayes 
has given her time and thought to the development of Epworth League 
institutes and has had remarkable success. As no worker of the Board is here it 
is a lonely place, but beautiful and well cared for with a comfortable house and 
a large constituency. She has now gone on furlough and Miss Armenia Thomp- 
son is her successor. 

Mrs. C. C. Peale, Official Correspondent. 



Europe and North Africa 61 

SUMATRA MISSION CONFERENCE 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend'^ 
for January, May or October. 

Medan — Methodist Girls School — June E. Redinger, Mrs. Vera Edborg Ostrom. 
Asahan District — Freda P. Chadwick. Kisaran — Mrs. Lydia Oelschlager 
Aim. 

SUMATRA 

The lovely island is a challenging field, perhaps the greatest for its size in 
the world. Since the war, the Batak people who were formerly cannibals have 
come out of the jungle and are imbibing the spirit of nationalism. The stories 
told by our missionaries are worthy of a place in the annals of the whole 
foreign missionary movement as thrilling and vitalizing. 

Four women are on the field now, and Miss Schwab, the International 
Department worker whose salary is paid by the German Unit. The beautiful 
Medan School, which was dedicated in 1932, has an enrollment of over 200 girls^ 
and is a school of which our Society may be justly proud. 

Nine different racial groups are represented in the schools and a mis- 
sionary must be a linguist to serve in this Island. 

Mrs. C. C. Peale, Official Corresp07ideut. 



EUROPE AND NORTH AFRICA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries, see "Woman's Missionary Friend'^ 
for January, May or October. 

Bulgaria 

LovETCH — American Girls School — Mellony F. Turner, Etta Mary Gifford. 

Italy 

Rome — Crandon Institute — Mrs. Artele B. Ruese, Mrs. Florence G. Reeves. 

Closed in June,J^935. 

North Africa 
Algiers — Fan Kirk Home (Les Aiglons) — Ruth S. Wolfe. Evangelistic Work 

— Mary Anderson. French Student Work — L. Frances Van Dyne, Martha 

D. Whiteley. 

CoNSTANTiNE — Gamble Memorial Home — Emilie R. Loveless, Frances E. 
Roberds. Bradley Memorial Social-Evangelistic Center — Nora Webb, 

E. Gwendoline Narbeth.* 

Il Maten — Glora M. Wysner, Martha Robinson. 
Language Study — Eva A. Ostrom. 

BULGARIA 

Lovetch — The Lovetch School has continued to attract girls from all over 
Bulgaria because of the fine type of academic education it offers and especially 
because of the training in Christian character the girls receive. During the last 
few years the dormitories have been full to overflowing with from one hundred 
seventy-five to two hundred girls. The government schools are still having the 
*On furlough. 



62 In Lands Ajar 

old semi-classical courses for girls, but the officials have given Miss Turner 
permission to start some new home-making courses which will help the students 
to be better wives and mothers. The school Y. W. C. A. has been doing charity 
work helping five very poor families in the town, maintaining a dining-room 
for poor children, helping several needy girls in the schooK It also contributed 
towards the sports equipment for the school and sent its leader to Bucharest 
on a friendship tour. 

ITALY 

Rome — For many years Crandon Institute has been training not only the 
young women of Italy but also girls from many other countries who happened 
to be in Rome for one reason or another. It has been the only Protestant school 
for girls in Rome and was for many years the only good boarding school for 
girls in the city. During the last few years the situation has somewhat changed 
as the government has established fine schools for girls, as have also some other 
nations. The number of students at Crandon has decreased very considerably 
while the expenses for taxes, repairs and general running expenses have greatly 
increased, so with great regret at the annual meeting in Washington, October, 
1934, it was voted to close Crandon at the end of the school year in June, 1935. 
The Board of Foreign Missions is also withdrawing from Italy and turning 
over its work to the British Wesleyans. Mrs. Ruese has consented to remain 
in Italy for the present and we are hoping to sell our property as soon as 
possible. 

FRANCE 

Grenoble — Our Foyer in this city which was opened just after the war 
to take care of war orphans was closed in July, 1934, as the need for such an 
institution no longer existed. The buildings have been rented to the F"rench 
Y. W. C. A. at a very nominal rental with the idea that they will purchase the 
property in a few years. The Y. W. C. A. has a hostel for young women and 
has had many groups of young people using the buildings so it is carrying out 
the purpose for which our Society bought the property, namely the training of. 
youth in Christian character for Christian service. 



NORTH AFRICA 

Algiers — After many years of service in North Africa, the Misses Welch 
and Smith retired from service in 1933. To them is due the honor of founding 
the Van Kirk Home or Les Aiglons as it is familiarly called. Perched on the 
side of the high hill overlooking the bay of Algiers, it has during twenty years 
been the home for many needy children. Twenty-three of the girls who have 
gone from the home have married and Miss Welch and Miss Smith are now 
spending a good deal of their time visiting these married girls, giving them 
encouragement when needed and helping them live up to the Christian ideals 
they received in the home. These Christian families have had a marked 
influence in the communities where they are scattered so much so that fathers 
who havT seen them have come to our missionaries at Les Aiglons asking that 
their children may have the same training. The children in the home all go to 
the French schools in the city, except a very few tiny ones who are too small 
to go to school yet. The members of the commission representing the Board 
and the Society who visited North Africa this spring will not soon forget the 
baptismal service in the Algiers church on Sunday, May 5th, when five of the 
lovely girls from the home and two boys from the boys home received Christian 
baptism, thus taking their stand as followers of Christ. 



Europe and North Africa 63 

The student hostel for French women students attending the university, 
has, in addition to housing from nine to fifteen girls, been the center for different 
groups of students and young people who have gone there to discuss many of 
the economic, social and religious questions that young people are thinking 
about today. Our missionaries have found many of them seeking for real 
spiritual reality and have been able to help them find the truth in Christ. The 
Villa Carnahan, the beautiful rest home just outside the city of Algiers on the 
Mediterranean, has been used frequently by groups of students, and as they 
have sat around the fire discussing spiritual things, Christ has become very 
real to them. 

Miss Mary Anderson in her work with the French women and children 
in a poor section of the city has, through her classes and her visiting in the 
homes, been able to bring spiritual help to many women, and she has had the 
great joy of seeing some of them accept Christ as their Savior. As soon as they 
accept Christ and his way of living, she has taught them to pass on what they 
have received, so they have been contributing of their little to the work at II 
Maten and to the Bible Society for the distribution of the Scriptures. 

CoNSTANTiNE — The Fraticesca Nast Gamble Memorial Home moved into 
its new building in 1931 and since that time has had from twenty to thirty 
Arab girls, all but the smallest of whom have attended the French schools of 
the city. If they had remained in their own homes, probably no one of them 
would even have learned to read or write. Some of the older girls from the 
home have been sent to France for training in nursing, sewing, etc., and have 
returned to become self-supporting women. It has been very difficult to find 
Christian Arab husbands for the older girls as the whole Arab community with 
only a few exceptions, has stood out like a stone wall against Christianity. 

The Hannah Bradley Memorial or Neighborhood House, is situated on the 
edge of the Arab section of the city where it can minister to the many women 
and children who come to it secretly by the back narrow alley way, in order 
not to be seen, or openly by the front door. Besides the classes for women and 
girls, the missionaries have done much visiting in the homes where they are 
usually welcomed because of the friendly services they have given to the 
families. Very frequently women have come to the home to be taken to the 
hospitals as they are afraid to go alone. They know they will receive from the 
missionaries whatever help they need, mental, physical or spiritual. 

Il Maten — This station high up in the mountains of Little Kabylia has 
ministered to the physical, mental and spiritual needs of its community. The 
school for girls is the only one in a very large section as the French have as 
yet only a few schools for girls outside of the large cities. The children are 
taught not only the three R's but especially how to keep clean. Weekly baths 
for the girls were so much appreciated in the little village near the mission 
station that the boys asked whether they could not have them also, so a number 
of boys each week are given bath tickets, probably none of them ever having 
had baths before. The dispensary held each week by one of the French 
teachers who is also a nurse, has attracted people not only from the nearby 
villages but some even further away as there are almost no doctors in the 
mountains. Burns are very common as all the cooking in the little homes is 
done in a small hole in the dirt floor so both the children and grown-ups fre- 
quently get into the fire. Milk is provided by the mission station for the 
mothers who cannot nurse their babies and every week the babies are brought 
to be weighed and the mothers are taught how to care for them. 

Miss Juliet H. Knox, Official Correspondent. 



64 1 71 Lands Ajar 

LATIN AMERICA 

MISSIONARIES AND THEIR STATIONS 

For present correct addresses of missionaries see ''Woman's Missionary Friend" 
for January, May or October. 

Mexico 

Mexico City — Sarah L. Keen Colegio — Under Mexican leadership. Industrial 
School — Ethel E. Thomas. Evangelistic Work — Laura Temple, Mary N- 
Pearson, Pearl Walrath, Gertrude Arbogast. Bible Training School — - 
Ruth V. Warner, Elsie M. Shepherd. 

PuEBLA — Instituto Normal Methodista — Grace A. Hollister, Addie C. Dyer, 
May B. Seal. 

Pachuca — Colegio Hijas de Allende — Under Mexican leadership. 

Guanajuato — Colegio Juarez — Blanche A. Betz, Martha Daniels. 

CoRTAZAR — Evangelistic Work — Mary Baird. 

On Furlough — Jeanette HofYmann, Hazel McAllister. 

Eastern South America 

Buenos Aires — Instituto Modelo deObreras Cristianas — In 1935-1936 under a 

national Vice-Directora. Religious Education — No appointment. 
Montevideo — Instituto Crandon — Jennie Reid, Evelyn Corbett, BessHallagan, 

Florence Merryman. 
RosARio — Colegio Norte Americano — Olive I. Givin. Instituto Gleason — Under 

a national Directora. 
On Furlough — Katherine M. Donahue, Rhoda C. Edmeston, Ruth M. 

Wilson. 

North Andes 
Lima — Lima High School — E. Gertrude Hanks, Frances C. Vandegrift, May 

Murphy, Treva B. Overholt, Ruth Greenwood, Beatrice Terry. Religious 

Education — Bernice M. Cornelison. 

MEXICO 

Our schools have labored under difficulties during the past few years. 
First came the law which made it impossible to send any new missionary 
teachers into the country and which sent home a few we already had there 
who had gone into the country just after the law was passed but before it was 
enforced. This law was aimed not only at schools but at all industries, stores, 
etc., and was to the effect that only a limited number of foreigners could have 
jobs in Mexico as the Mexicans needed them. Then for some years the govern- 
ment has forbidden religious instruction except in the boarding departments of 
our schools but in October, 1934, a very drastic law was passed stating that 
no religious organization of any kind could conduct primary, secondary or 
normal schools nor could any school carry on any kind of religious propaganda. 
Our missionaries realized that these laws were aimed especially at the Catholic 
schools who had not been keeping the already existing laws but nevertheless 
we had to obey them. Some of our missionaries felt that the time had come 
when the Society should decide as to whether our schools wert needed in 
Mexico now that there are good government schools, and second whether our 
schools were justifiable when no religious propaganda could be carried on. 
The matter has been studied this year and at the meeting of the General 
Executive Committee in St. Louis it was decided that the Society cannot longer 
use its funds for the support of primary, secondary or normal schools. This 
action was in line with one taken by the Mexican section of the Committee on 
Co-operation in Latin America in September, 1935, to the effect that in its 
opinion the day for secular education in Mexico on the part of mission boards 



Latin Aynerica 65 

has probably passed and that the boards should adjust themselves accordingly 
by using their properties for other things or disposing of them. Our schools in 
Mexico have in the past contributed much toward the building of the Kingdom 
and it was with the very deepest regret that we voted to close them. We are 
not withdrawing from Mexico as a Society but are planning to use our appro- 
priations for other forms of service such as hostels, social centers, literature, 
etc. Our few missionaries who have been in school work will be released for 
these new types of service. 

Three of our missionaries, the Misses Baird, Hoffmann and McAllister, 
started rural social centers a few years ago, the former in the state of Guana- 
juato and the latter two in a rural section just out of the city of Puebla. The 
mission boards have done very little rural work in Mexico and as Mexico is 
more than three-fourths rural, such social centers are greatly needed. Miss 
Baird found the people of Cortazar very unfriendly when she first went there 
but after she had helped some of the mothers through a measles epidemic, 
almost every home was open to her. She has been co-operating with the state 
officials in their health programs. At Libertad Miss Hoffmann and Miss 
McAllister w'ere given a little room by one of the women who belonged to the 
little church and here they had kindergarten, sewing and cooking classes, etc., 
all of which were much appreciated by the people of the village. 

The Misses Pearson and Walrath have been doing evangelistic work in 
some of the churches in Mexico City, and through their services in teaching 
classes, organizing groups of young people and children, they have contributed 
much toward the building up of the churches where they have worked. 

At the Aztecas St. Church in Mexico City two of our Mexican women have 
done valiant service. Miss Perez as church deaconess and Doctora Baez as 
physician for the many needy people of that very poor section of the city. 
Through the ministry of these two faithful women, the church has been built 
up and many have found Christ. 

The Bible Training School has as yet not been interfered with in any way 
by the government. The regular deaconess course, except for a very few 
students, has been discontinued as most of the Mexican churches have not 
been able to support deaconesses of their own. In place of the former pre- 
scribed courses, Miss Warner has decided to stress the training of lay workers, 
i. e., take the ordinary young woman church member and give her training in 
Bible and methods of church work for a year, more or less as the woman has 
the time. This religious training has been given in the mornings and in the 
afternoons the students have attended a vocational government school in the 
neighborhood in order to learn a trade by which they can make a living. For 
their extension work, the students have been doing practice teaching in one of 
the villages and in women's groups in the city. The six weeks short courses 
during the early winter have proven most valuable for mothers and others who 
can be away from home for only a short time. Two institutes for preachers' 
wives have also been held for a week each and have given the women a new 
vision of what they can do to help their husbands. 

Miss Juliet H. Knox, Official Correspondent. 

SOUTH AMERICA 
Educational Work 

Buenos Aires — In 1932 the Disciples, because of financial stringency, 
withdrew their co-operation from the Training School, known as Instituto 
Modelo de Obreras Cristianas. Realizing the importance of this institution in 
the training of evangelical women leaders for South America, the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society voted to assume the entire support of the school 
and transferred it to a property already owned by the Society. 

The work of the Instituto is closely affiliated with that of the Union 



66 hi Lands Ajar 

Theological Seminary, both in curriculum and in the social and spiritual life 
of the students of both institutions, making it one of the few coeducational 
missionary projects in South America. While each institution maintains its 
identity, the following combined courses are now offered: (1) A three-year 
course for young men and women entering the ministry' or deaconess work. 
These students must hold a college degree. This course makes the requirements 
for full time women workers and pastors the same. (2) A course covering three 
terms of ten weeks each for those with less academic preparation who desire 
training as lay workers, local preachers and Sunday school teachers. (3) Peeling 
the need of making the courses more flexible for university students, nurses in 
training, social and other workers, the Seminary and Instituto take into their 
dormitories a few high-grade young people, chiefly from the evangelical 
churches, who, while pursuing studies in other institutions in Buenos Aires, 
wish to take supplemental courses in our mission schools, in order to become 
more intelligent Protestant workers. 

The Instituto has an alumnae college for graduates who return at com- 
mencement for one week of intensive study and fellowship. A summer course 
is held in Buenos Aires or elsewhere. In the 1935 summer school, held in 
Montevideo, twenty-live students were enrolled. 

Almost every denomination working in South America is represented in 
the enrollment of the Instituto and students come from Bolivia, Paraguay, 
Peru, Chile, Uruguay and other republics. The school supplies women leaders 
for the Protestant church in many parts of the continent. Among its graduates 
are a Peruvian young woman who is now an evangelical missionary in Peru; 
an Uruguayan who is the pastor of two mission churches in Montevideo; 
an Argentine who is Directora of our social-exangelistic center in Rosario; a 
social service worker in the Cerro, Montevideo; and a Waldensian who preaches 
in a church of that denomination. In 1935-1936 a graduate of the class of 1933, 
Senorita Ana Cepollina, is acting as directora. 

Montevideo — Crandon Institute is the only Protestant secondary school 
for girls on the east coast south of Brazil. For the past ten years the school has 
been self-supporting except for missionaries' salaries. Recently the Society 
has been financially unable to replace missionaries or contract teachers whose 
terms have expired and the burden falls upon the school of supplying sub- 
stitutes who must be paid from the locally earned budget. This makes a heavy 
drain on the school treasury in these days of decreased enrollment and in- 
creased taxes. Ways and means of increasing funds are being developed. 
Two hundred women have eagerly grasped the opportunity of studying 
English in adult classes. A post-graduate course in home economics is attract- 
ing back to Crandon alumnae who majored in this popular department. Its 
present head, Miss Florence Merryman, was recently, during a vacation, com- 
mandeered by Swift & Co., in Montevideo, as advisor of the canning division 
of this great packing establishment. Through a radio service Crandon broad- 
casts modern home-making methods all over that part of South America. 

The commercial department has recently experimented by placing its 
students in actual business ofhces for practice work with the result that the 
demand is greater than the supply. 

Crandon graduates occupy places of large responsibility, being active in 
church work, in national temperance and social service organizations, and in 
child welfare. More than a dozen are serving as teachers in their Alma Mater. 
A Crandon graduate was selected by the Institute of International Education 
in 1932 as the first recipient of a Latin American fellowship. Because of her 
success in winning her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College, two more Crandon 
girls have been granted similar fellowships in the University of Texas and Iowa 
State College for 1935-1936. 

Rosario — Through sixty years Colegio Norte Americano has upheld 
Protestant ideals in the Argentine. About 120 girls are enrolled in the regular 



Latin America 6 7 

Spanish course which covers the first six grades and has government recogni- 
tion. The required curriculum is supplemented by Bible and English. The two 
special departments, English and commercial, have been completely reorgan- 
ized with such good results that the standing of the school has been raised. The 
three-year commercial course is based upon the needs as brought forth in a 
questionnaire which was sent to the principal business firms and banks in 
Rosario. Extra-curricular activities include the Blue Triangle Club, affiliated 
with the Y. W. C. A. of Buenos Aires, through which the girls put into practice 
the moral and spiritual teaching given them in Bible classes, chapel and 
vesper services. 

Lima — Since the new building of Lima High School was occupied in 1932, 
the matriculation, which for years had averaged about 20CH has more than 
doubled and 430 students are now enrolled. In addition to the general courses in 
Spanish, which were recently granted government recognition, a student is 
now able to choose her major in one of three special departments — commercial, 
home economics and physical education — which are conducted by highly 
trained North American missionaries. Graduates of the commercial depart- 
ment have been filling significant places in the business world of Peru for more 
than a decade. The other two departments have been established during the 
quadrennium. 

The well-equipped building is made available for many outside groups. 
Classes for men and women are held in the gymnasium; the Union Church 
uses the building for its social activities; Peruvian women appreciate the 
classes in domestic science; alumnae frequent the tennis courts and hold 
business meetings around the cafeteria lunch tables. 

Courses in Bible for every class emphasize the simple truths of Christ's 
teachings. Here girls develop a yearning for a personal relationship with the 
Master and are helped to realize that He can become a vital force in their lives. 
They are also awakened to an interest in the great social problems of the day. 
Some of the Protestant girls are being fitted for specific tasks in their churches 
and some, who have been dissatisfied in the church in which they were brought 
up but in which they fail to find the Living Christ, have come to love and serve 
Him in our own church. Every young woman teaching in our Methodist 
Sunday school in Lima has been a student in Lima High School. Outstanding 
among the alumnae is one of the head nurses in the British-American Hospital 
who has recently been offered by the city of Lima a scholarship to cover three 
years of training in social service in Santiago, Chile, in order that she may 
return to further that cause in Peru. Another graduate is the first trained 
woman worker in Peru and is now in charge of a small mission church in Lima 
and active in the extension of Sunday schools and in the creation of Christian 
literature in Spanish. 

Evangelistic Work 

Buenos Aires — In 1930 the work of religious education in the East South 
America Conference was strengthened by the appointment of Miss Isabel 
Latimer who co-operated with the Rev. Hugh C. Stuntz of the Board of Foreign 
Missions. Profitable work was done in the creation of Sunday school literature 
and in the organization of training classes, leagues and many young people's 
institutes. The work fell upon hard times when the Board transferred Mr. 
Stuntz to educational work in Bolivia and funds were decreased by every 
co-operating agency. Miss Latimer carried on alone until her term ended in 
November, 1935. The churches have developed an appreciation of this work 
and will to a limited degree be able to carry on several local projects, but its 
future will depend upon our supplying new works and increased funds. 

Rosario — Gleason Institute, our social-evangelistic center, is now in charge 
of a group of well-trained young Argentine women, headed by Senorita Sara 
Villalba, graduate of Instituto Modelo. In addition to her deaconess training, 



68 In Lands Afar 

this consecrated young woman has taken a university diploma in mid-wifery 
and has recently published a pamphlet, "Advice for Expectant Mothers," 
which is on sale in all the municipal maternity centers. Gleason's doors are 
wide open to minister in the name of Christ to men and women, young people 
and children. 

Montevideo — Practically all the Methodist evangelistic and Sunday 
school work in Montevideo is in the hands of two Crandon graduates, trained 
in the Instituto Modelo and now connected with the Central Methodist Church 
and several smaller mission churches. Crandon girjs are active in the group of 
young women known as the "Sara Hatfield Missionary Society" of Central 
Church, whose program is a model for any similar organization in North 
America, and also in the Federation of Evangelical Youth of Uruguay. Dr. 
John A. MacKay says, "The evangelical young people of Montevideo carry 
on the most varied program of activities to be found anywhere in Latin 
America. The Federation edits the best evangelical paper in Latin America, 
called La Idea, which has an increasingly wide circulation and influence 
throughout the continent. They follow with the closest concern the march 
of public affairs and never let an opportunity paSs to make their influence teU 
for righteousness." 

Lima — -The workers in educational evangelism find everywhere a seething 
eagerness for instruction in the spiritual life. Especially is this felt among the 
young people, who gather in Sunday schools, leagues and institutes. Peruvian 
women are developing splendid leadership in the Evangelical Women's League. 
Those who in former years would not dare to lift their voices in public are now 
leading their own groups and arranging worth while conventions. They pay a 
large part of the salary of the national deaconess. Evangelical groups in the 
Andes are eagerly requesting Christian help. Classes were held last summer 
for those wishing to be trained as teachers in daily vacation Bible schools, with 
the result that eleven churches in the Cordilleras now carry on such work. 
Among the interesting changes in the last few years is the increased responsi- 
bility taken by the Peruvians. Foreign leadership in these schools has practi- 
cally disappeared except in the leadership training classes held for the many 
young people who are eager to help in this work. 

Miss Carrie J. Carnahan, Official Correspondent. 



COLLEGES 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
Hwa Nan College, Foochow, China 

Missionary Faculty — -Lucy C. Wang, President. Elizabeth H. Richey, Edith 
McBee*, Elsie H. Reik, M. Grace Davis, L. Ethel Wallace, Marion R. 
Cole, Mary Louise Lowe*, Eugenia Savage, Roxy Lefforge, Jane Carlson, 
Frances S. Fulton. 

The corresponding secretary was privileged to attend the Hwa Nan College 
commencement and also the Fukien Christian University commencement. 
Hwa Nan graduated seven. The alumnae group was the largest ever in attend- 
ance at commencement. I was privileged to meet the alumnae from the Philip- 
pine Islands, Amoy, Peiping, and Shanghai. In all of these places alumnae 
organizations have been started. 

Hwa Nan's enrollment for this fall promised to be the largest in years. 
They were anticipating close to one hundred pupils. Miss Doris Hsu was just 
returning from Ann Arbor where she received her Ph.D. and is to be the new 
Dean of Women. 

•On furlough. 



Colleges 69 

The spirit of loyalty and co-operation is most satisfactory from the obser- 
vation of the secretary, for which we are truly grateful. 

The new Practice House which was built by funds on the field some time 
ago has just been furnished by JMr. Liu and is a most modern and up to date 
home. Hwa Xan has just receiv^edSSOOO Alex, as a grant from the Government. 

Our church work in Foochow is one of the most outstanding pieces of work 
that I witnessed on the field. Interest on the part of students and Christians in 
Foochow is very noticeable and commendable. The pastor is an outstanding 
man; his wife is a graduate of Hwa Nan. 

Mrs. Leon Roy Peel, Official Correspondent. 

Kwassui Woman's College, Nagasaki, Japan 

Missionary Faculty — Anna Laura White, President. Caroline S. Peckham*, 
Adella M. Ashbaugh, Helen Couch, Vera J. Fehr, Olive Curry, Olive L 
Hagen. 

A little more than four years ago, Kwassui College teachers and the equally 
interested high school teachers, met in the president's office at the call of vice- 
president. Okabe, for a prayer service of thanksgiving. A cable had just come 
from Miss White, then on furlough, that the money had been granted for the 
long hoped for college building. It was not just that new class rooms were to 
take the place of the dark crowded ones; and that the command of the Imperial 
Bureau of Education that suitable accommodations be made for the historical 
old school was at last to be obeyed. Kwassui's very life had depended on the 
new building. 

It will always seem a wonder building to all of us who love Kwassui. The 
money was granted at the time when the greatest value could be had for the 
least money in years, so that the actual cost in dollars was little more than half 
the estimate made a year before. High above beautiful Nagasaki bay the 
college stands to greet all incoming ships. If imitation is the sincerest praise 
then Kwassui is well praised for all through Kyushiu when new government 
schools are to be built teachers are sent to study Kwassui's building. 

The last four years have been in Japan, as in all the world, years of storm 
and stress. Unemployment has not made itself so much felt in the working 
classes as in the "White collar class." Parents have been quick to say, espe- 
cially of girls, that if there were to be no position at the end of the course why 
go to the expense of four years of study. All colleges have felt the depression. 

But as teaching positions became scarcer new fields of opportunity have 
been opening to Kwassui girls in business. Three young graduates have just 
taken positions as interpreters in "Foreign style" hotels, that is tourist hotels. 
Others have gone into offices as English typists and secretaries. All write of 
their determination to do their very best that the way may be opened for more 
Kwassui girls to follow. 

When the beautiful new building was completed it was not the missionary 
teachers but a Japanese teacher who said, "Now Kwassui is suitably housed 
more than ever we must pour ourselves into making her richer spiritually." 
The recurrent note in the letters of graduates is of gratitude to the college for 
helping them to find God and a new way of life. Statistics do not tell the whole 
story. The number of Christians for example is always given as the number 
of baptised Christians. One radiant girl who was graduated from the high 
school and then the college wrote, "I am not a baptised Christian for I know 
that to become baptised and thus separate myself openly from my family 
would be to disrupt the beautiful unity of my happy home and hurt my parents 
who are earnest Buddhists. But I know that as long as I live I can never be 
separated from the love of God." 

Anna Laura White President. 

*On furlough. 



70 In Lands Ajar 

UNION COLLEGES 
Woman's College, West China Union University, Chengtu, China 

President — 

Vy. F. M. S. Representatives on the Faculty — Pearl B. Fosnot*, Ovidia 

Hanging. 

In the year that has just passed the Woman's College, a unit of the 
West China Union University, noted its tenth birthday. The year opened 
with a registration of 108, an increase of exactly 100 over the first entrance 
class of eight, ten years ago. The popularity of the College is proving some- 
what of an embarrassment to the three co-operating Women's Boards— the 
United Church of Canada, the Northern Baptists and the Methodist Epis- 
copal. While more than one-fourth of the students taking university courses 
are women, the Women's Boards have never appointed more than three 
members on the teaching staff, which is a very small percentage of the entire 
faculty. Often we are reminded of this disparity and in a meeting of the Board 
of Governors in October, 1935, this Board expressed, by resolution, the "strong 
hope that the Women's Boards of Missions provide at least six qualified 
women teachers." The old Dormitory used for lower class women is filled to 
capacity; the new building while yet not crowded will soon call for a new wing. 

Forty-nine of the 106 who finished the courses last year were Methodist 
girls. In the 1935 graduating clfiss of nine, three were Methodists. 

The distribution as to courses which these 106 young women chose last 
year are as follows: Medicine, thirty-three; Dentistry, fifteen; Science, nineteen; 
Arts, twenty-four; Education, nine; Pharmacy, six. The trend of China in 
recent years in swinging so far toward science is here illustrated. 

Ninety-five per cent of the total enrollment of the College are church 
members. The Student Christian Movement is very active both in building 
up the life of individuals and in social service. Twenty Bible study fellowship 
groups have met regularly throughout the year and have found a ready 
response. Six girls have decided for the Christian life this year and have 
united with the church of their choice. Two joined the Methodist, three, 
the Church of Christ in China and one, the Baptist church. They all came 
from Government schools and it does one's heart good to see how these girls 
who are having their first contact with Christianity here in the College think 
things through and decide what they really want to do." Although this 
University is registered with the Government and subject to the Government 
regulations with regard to Christian teaching, the first afternoon of the fall 
term was set aside for a spiritual retreat for faculty members, Chinese and 
Western. The President, a Methodist I am proud to say, thus publicly, 
with many of his staff, declared that in the strength of God they placed their 
faith. 

Reports come telling of the fourth Student Conference held in the 
Lungshen Hills under the auspices of the Student Christian Movement and 
directed by Wallace Wang, its secretary, who is a great spiritual force among 
young people. The morning was given to a program of inspirational talks 
and discussion groups. The afternoons were left free for practical work among 
the farmers. Classes in Mass Education and Rural Reconstruction were held. 
Student doctors and nurses dispensed medical aid as well as education in 
hygiene. These conferences do as much, if not more, for the students as for 
those to whom they minister. 

A new building has been erected on this University campus during the 
last summer. The Goucher Practise School of the Faculty of Education. The 
building is a memorial gift of Mrs. Elizabeth Goucher Chapman in memory 
of her father who was a former chairman of the Board of Governors, Dr. John 
F. Goucher. 

Mrs. Frank E. Baker. 

*On furlough. 



Union Colleges 71 

Ginling College, Nanking, China 

President — Yi-Fang \Vu. 

Methodist Members of Faculty — Cora D. Reeves, Harriet Whitmer. 

The last four years, which this report covers, have witnessed tragic and 
difficult days in China, but Ginling students have maintained their record 
of poise and restraint. Immediately following the Shanghai incident a few 
of the western faculty reluctantly evacuated but soon returned. 

During the summer of 1933 President Wu accepted an invitation to 
represent Chinese women and speak at the International Congress of Women 
at Chicago. She wa:s also one of the Chinese delegates to the Institute of 
Pacific Relations at Banff. Later she joined the United Foreign Missions 
Conferences heljd in twenty-nine cities. After her return to China she was 
elected chairman of the National Christian Council. 

Steady though slow increase in the student body has continued in spite 
of disturbed conditions and the pull toward the larger coeducational univer- 
sities. For some years there has been limited co-operation between Ginling 
and the University of Nanking. At present new co-operative movements 
are under way. 

Ginling graduates have from the beginning related themselves to the 
life of the community surrounding the college. The Christian ideal of service 
has found expression in continually expanding social and religious activities. 
Two graduates have joined the staff of the Christian Rural Service Union 
in Le Chuan, Kiangsi, a project sponsored and supported by the government. 
Daughters of Gingling are found all over China and in Malaya in various 
forms of service. 

During the most tense time following the Shanghai incident three Christian 
students, representing the Christian students of China, visited Japan with a 
desire to reach, through conference with Japanese Christian students, a better 
understanding between the two countries. A Ginling student was chosen 
as one of the three. 

As a memorial to Madame Soong a new dormitory for the Practice School 
has been given by her daughters, Madame Sun Yat Sen, Madame Kunga 
Hsiang-hsi and Madame Chiang Kai-shek. From students and almunae 
have come gifts in the form of equipment for the new buildings. A generous 
contribution has been received from an alumna and her husband as the begin- 
ning of a fund for the retirement of Chinese members of the faculty. In this 
connection we may mention gifts made by western members of the faculty to 
current expenses. 

Two new buildings were erected in 1934, the Chapel-Music Hall and the 
Library-Administration Building. They were made possible by the balance 
of the 1921-1922 Union College Campaign Fund held for the completion of 
the original building program. 

An absolute charter was granted Ginling January 25, 1935. Prior to 
this the college functioned under the charter of the University of Nanking 
with independent powers of administration. What was previously known 
as the Ginling College Committee of the Board of Founders of the University 
of Nanking thus became the Board of Founders of Ginling College. 

This college of high achievement in the past and of great potential value 
to China and Christianity in the future is facing a serious crisis created by 
greatly reduced income. How to maintain her high standards is the problem. 

Eliz.\beth R. Bender. 



72 In Lands Ajar 

School of Medicine, Cheeloo University, Tsinan, Shantung, China 

President — Shuming T. Liu. 

Dean OF Women — Mme. L. H. L. Yui. 

Dean of Medical School — -Dr. P. C. Kiang. 

W. F. M. S. Representatives on Staffs — E. Florence Evans, R.N., Julia 

E. Morgan, M.D., Mary Katherine Russell, B.S.*, Mollie E. Townsend, 

R.N., Frances R. Wilson, R.N. 

In the United States there is one physician for each 785 people. The 
proportion in China is one to 95,000. The evident need is being all too slowly 
met by a few medical schools. Cheeloo is one of them — one that is conspicuous 
for the service rendered by its graduates. A survey made last January reveals 
the fact that there are 359 living graduates. Of these, 130 are serving in 
eighty-one mission hospitals and fifty-nine in government hospitals and public 
health centers. Of the thirty graduates last June, nineteen are in mission 
hospitals. Ninety percent of the total number of graduates are Christians and 
they exert a fine influence in their communities. They are worthy of the tribute 
paid by an outstanding Chinese medical leader in saying, "The graduates you 
have produced, their achieveinents, and the careers some of them have carved 
for themselves are a credit to any institution. You have succeeded in turning 
out men and women with a spirit of duty and self-sacrifice." 

The enrollment of the medical school is one hundred. That of the school 
of nursing is fifty. The hospital at present is maintaining 1 10 beds, and has the 
splendid record for the year of caring for 2,000 in-patients and giving 80,000 
out-patient treatments. Aside from the salaries of twenty-two doctors and 
nurses paid by missionary boards and societies, fifty percent of the budget of 
the school is covered by student fees and income of the hospital. The teaching 
is very largely in the Chinese language though there is an English requirement 
for entrance and most graduates go out able to use English medical literature. 
Cheeloo has taken the lead during all its career in making the science of 
medicine both modern and truly indiginous to China. The Translation Bureau 
is constantly at work on medical textbooks and is performing an excellent 
service to the profession throughout China in culling from foreign medical 
periodicals the most valuable things to be circulated in Chinese. Visitors to 
Cheeloo Medical School will heartily agree with one who recently said, "One 
gets a tremendous impression of much good work being done in a very small 
space and with very modest equipment." 

The enlargement so urgently needed for many years is at this writing 
being realized. Building funds were secured through the women's boards in 
part from the Union College Campaign of 1921 and 1922, and in part from 
appropriations by the co-operating boards in the adjustments made when the 
Peking Woman's Medical School was moved from Peking to Tsinan and 
amalgamated with the Cheeloo School for men. A continuous chain of cir- 
cumstances adverse to putting up the buildings has obtained and not until 
1935 has it been possible. One wing of the hospital, and the out-patient depart- 
ment building are nearing completion.. It is a matter of peculiar interest to our 
W. F. M. S. at the moment to realize the stress being laid on training for 
public health work. The government has recently released half the time of one 
of the important officials of the National Field Health Administration that he 
may serve as head of the Public Health Department of Cheeloo. 

Mrs. J. M. Avann. 

*On furlough. 



Union Colleges 73 

Yenching College for Women, Peiping, China 

President — J. Leighton Stuart. 
Acting Dean of Women — -Margaret Speer. 

W. F. M. S. Representatives on the Faculty — Ruth Stahl, Monona L. 
Cheney.* 

Yenching University, of which the Woman's College is an integral part, is 
the largest of the Christian Union Universities and one of the best equipped. It 
has been designated in the correlated program as the school to do the graduate 
work for the Christian colleges in China and a hundred or more students are 
annually there for such study. 

Young womanhood in China today has stepped out into a new and 
eflfective position of such importance as to require training that is second to 
none. More than a fourth of Yenching's students (275this fall) are women and 
they are offered equal opportunities with men. They attend the same classes, 
work in the same laboratories and do the same kind of field work. They engage 
in the same extra-curricular activities. The women are keen competitors for 
scholarship awards and take a prominent part in every phase of the college life. 
Women who have majored in education are filling teaching positions, others 
are engaged in social work, religious work, home economics, rural work, 
research in the applied sciences, journalism, medicine, and other phases of the 
new social order. It is Yenching's purpose to bring together the finest per- 
manent values from our western culture with the best of the Oriental heritage, 
so interrelated as to give students the best preparation for a life of effective 
service to their fellowmen. 

There are very exceptional facilities for physical training, for games and 
sports, in the splendidly equipped Boyd Gymnasium, and great stress is put 
upon the building of sound bodies. The spiritual and religious side of student 
life and activities is not omitted from the plan and program. Quoting from a 
recent letter: "Outstanding personalities on the faculty are presenting Chris- 
tianity with a new enthusiasm in the class-room, in special study groups, in 
music and in personal contacts with the students. There is a strong religious 
atmosphere pervading the entire university." 

There has been cause for some anxiety concerning the University through 
the period of distrubance in the North China area. In the early summer of this 
year because of threatened military occupation, it was feared that students 
could not or would not come to Peiping. On the contrary a larger proportion 
both of old and accepted new students presented themselves with the result 
that there is a recoid-breaking enrollment of 885. More than a fifth, as usual, 
came from Canton; the same ratio, as usual, from more distant parts of China 
and other countries. In view of the economic depression, the lower cost in 
government institutions, and the 37}^ per cent increase in our tuition this year, 
a growing appreciation of Yenching by the general public is implied. There are 
also very gratifying indications of confidence and esteem on the part of high 
government officials in courtesies extended the president of the University in 
inaugurating the campaign for endowment funds in Nanking; on the part of 
newly organized foundations in gifts made by them; and on the part of the 
Central Government in its emergency grant of $60,000 1. c, the largest, but one, 
to any of the private colleges and universities from the amount authorized for 
that purpose. 

Mrs. J. K. Cecil. 

*On furlough. 



74 In Lands Afar 

Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, India 

Principal — Mary E. Shannon. 

W. F. M. S. Representatives on the Faculty — Vice Principal, Ava F. 
Hunt, Ruth C. Manchester*, Roxanna H. Oldroyd, Dorothy Speer*, 
Margaret Wallace, Laura V. Williams, Margaret Landrum, Florence 
Salzer, Isabella Thoburn, Marjorie A. Dimmitt*, Lulu A. Boles, Emma 
Tucker.* 

In December, 1931, Miss Shannon was ordered home immediately on 
sick leave, just when the contract for two additions to the main building, 
Nichols Hall, was ready for signature. Miss Ava Hunt was asked to undertake 
the heavy work of principalship, which included much responsibility for the 
building program. Under her administration the two beautiful wings were 
added, one containing library, assembly room and class rooms, the other the 
B.Sc. lecture rooms and laboratories. The latter was named Goucher College 
Wing, in recognition of the sustained interest and gifts of the young women 
of Goucher College. Not only did these additions relieve the pressure which 
had been felt for some years, but they greatly improve the appearance of the 
building which had always looked unfinished. It still lacks the big public hall 
which was in the original plan, but that was not as urgent a need as the addi- 
tional academic rooms. It was possible to build at the time the work was 
done because of the financial depression. The money had been in hand, but 
the Government had not been able to give their half, so the building had been 
delayed. Then when the depression struck India as well as the rest of the 
world, both materials and labour became so cheap that the amount which 
was expected to pay for only half the building paid for all of it by very slightly 
reducing the plans. 

In 1932, Mrs. Prem Nath Dass was elected Vice-Principal. Her high 
standards of Indian life and culture, and her unfailing readiness to stand by 
in every undertaking have been a great joy and satisfaction. 

Year by year the demands for admission to the two teacher training 
departments, one for under-graduates and one for graduates, have increased 
until at present the summer of every year is a time of agitation, of deputations 
from influential persons advocating the admission of one candidate or another, 
and of reams of correspondence. Restriction is necessary because of the 
limitations of staff and practice teaching opportunities. 

In 1935 there has been a very heavy demand also for admission to the 
pre-medical science course. Isabella Thoburn College is the only women's 
college in this Province with a science department, and the medical profession 
is becoming so popular with Indian women that the class is crowded. 

The staff changes slightly from year to year, the principal effect being 
that more Indian teachers are being taken on. As finances in America have 
made it impossible to send out teachers to replace those detained or leaving, 
it has been necessary to employ teachers on the field. That is desirable up 
to a certain point, but it is not always possible to find the Indian woman who 
has all the qualities desired — academic, personality and religious qualifications. 
It has been necessary to take a Hindu young woman for one subject to tide 
over some furloughs, but we do not wish to make this practice general. 

The enrollment has increased so that the college is now working at its 
greatest efficiency. It is one of the "pretty little ways of Providence" that 
in the years of greatest financial stress, classes (which means fees) should be 
at their fullest. 

Some mention should be made of the re-organization of the Bible teaching. 
Last year a new course bearing the rather cumbersome name Religious and 
Moral Instruction, was organized. This includes both Bible courses and 
courses bearing on the moral life. Every student in college must enroll in 

*On furlough. 



Union Colleges 75 

one course. This prevents the non-Christian girls from making religion an 
excuse to avoid two periods a week which Christians have been required to do. 
The result thus far has been very happy indeed, and it is hoped that Bible 
study will be more popular and more appreciated if it loses the stigma of 
being extra work for Christians only. 

The first college class was opened by Miss Thoburn in 1886. The college 
is therefore now in its fiftieth year, and it is hoped that the celebration of the 
Golden Jubilee in 1936 will be a time of joyous reunion of those throughout 
the world who have known and loved the college through any part of this 
wonderful half century. Mary E. Shannon, Principal. 

Woman's Christian College of Japan Tokyo 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Representative — Myrtle Z. Pider. 

"The Japanese educational system is based upon the French system, 
highly centralized and highly organized from kindergarten to the university. 
Primary schools are coeducational. Secondary schools are of two classes, — - 
middle school for boys; high schools for girls; curricula differing for boys and 
girls. Following the boys middle schools, come boys high or preparatory 
schools, leading to the university. This three year preparatory course is not 
provided for girls in the government system. There were in all the universities, 
in 1930, 80,913 students of whom only 42 were women. Therefore, as to women 
securing higher education in Japan, it must be almost entirely from institutions 
outside the government system. There are two government higher normal 
schools for women and five private institutions none of which does work quite 
equal to the university. Of these seven, only four provide Christian teachers 
for all the private Christian schools, which had, in 1933, 16,759 kindergarten 
pupils; 692 primary; 14,188 girls in secondary schools and 457 women in Bible 
Training schools. In no other eastern country save Korea, are the women so 
badly off for higher education as in Japan. The strategic center of Christian 
education for women is the Woman's Christian College at Tokyo. 

"The greatest needs of the Woman's Christian College are: (1) a larger 
current income. In Japan it is the custom to secure part time services from 
the most distinguished professors of universities, a method whereby the institu- 
tion gains in prestige, and wins public confidence. The gravest peril to the 
college lies in lack of yearly support to supply teachers of this type. If this 
College falls into second class, every Christian school in Japan will suffer. 
(2) A department of science, or household science. (3) A physical education 
training school, embodying a health program. (4) Extension of the present 
laboratory and the erection of a Chapel. 

"The invisible and intangible requirements must come first, for the 
standard of education in Japan is high, and no Christian institution dare 
become second class for want of financial support. The people of Japan are 
accustomed to simpler ways than we of the West and they place teaching 
before buildings." 

(Adapted from a report of Dr. Margaret Addison, Toronto, Canada.) 

Nevertheless buildings are needed. The outstanding present need is a 
Chapel, the approximate cost of which will be S60,000. Forty-five thousand 
dollars is in hand or in sight. Plans of unusual interest and beauty have been 
drawn, combining the best in modernistic architecture, with a charming adapta- 
tion of Japanese architectural forms. So good are the plans considered that 
they are published in full (February, 1935) with a highly commendatory 
article, in the Architectural Journal, one of the leading architectural periodicals 
in the United States. Fifteen thousand additional dollars will make this very 
beautiful building a reality as a center of educational and religious influence in 
Japan. 

The College had eighty-eight graduates in March, 1935. The enrollment 
for this year is 389. 



76 In Lands Afar 

Ewha College, Seoul, Korea 

President — Alice R. Appenzeller. 

Vice-President — Helen Kim. 

W. F. M. S. Representatives on the Faculty and Staff — L. Catherine 

Baker, Marian L. Conrow, Ada B. Hall, Jeannette C. Hulbert, Harriet P. 

Morris, Blanche H. Loucks, Grace H. Wood*, Moneta Troxel, Myrta O. 

Shaver, Mary E. Young. 

Kindergarten Training School, Charlotte Brownlee, Edna Marie Van Fleet. 

We have to report an epoch-making period in the past four years of 
Ewha's history. The academic work has been carried on with consistent 
success from year to year in each of the departments with few unusual or 
outstanding events of importance or significance. One such, however, was 
the return of Helen Kim in 1932 with a Ph.D. degree from Columbia. She is 
Vice-President. W^e look expectantly to her for leadership in the years to 
come. She has been actively interested in procuring endowment for the 
college from Korean sources. 

Two interesting projects have been tried and proven: One is the Home 
Economics Practice House, and the other the English House, in both of which 
a group of students live with teachers for a given period. The beautiful exper- 
iences in fellowship and friendship which have known no national bounds 
have been greater even than the main objective which is the practical help 
and experience gained by the girls. 

Not the least of the significant events to note is the establishment of an 
"Ewha Sunday" when woman's education in general and Ewha College in 
particular are the subjects of prayer in every church in Korean Methodism, 
and when an offering is taken for Ewha. Pitifully small amounts come from 
the little churches but they are as the Widow's mite. In March, 1933, the 
first class was graduated from the Home Economics Department. One of the 
graduates, who was a former student, was from a once wealthy family. She 
had married in the interim of her study periods and had two children. In 
addition to caring for them and her house, in order to take this course she 
earned her way, and also found time to write a Korean cook-book. 

The great achievement of these years is the creation of the new Ewha 
plant. It will be remembered that a gift of $35,000 from Mrs. Phillips Howard 
Gray, some years ago, purchased the coveted site of fifty acres, three miles 
out from the city, adjacent to Chosen Christian College. Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Pfeiffer's gifts of more than $100,000 to the building fund and small 
amounts from many individuals, enabled the Co-operating Committee to 
undertake the building project. Most fortunate circumstances have attended 
it; first, in the acquisition of a master-builder and expert business manager. 
Captain M. L. Swinehart; second, in high exchange on gold; and third, greatly 
reduced costs on materials and labor. Work was begun in the early spring 
of 1933 and on June 10th of that year the cornerstone of Pfeiffer Hall, the 
main and central building, and the first of the new Ewha was l^id. It was a 
great occasion. Later in that same year a like service was performed for 
Case Hall, the music building, a gift of the women of the Methodist Church 
South; Emmerson Hall, a wing of the same building; and the gymnasium, 
named for Mrs. R. L. Thomas. These buildings, in ceremonies befitting the 
signal occasion and in the presence of a great assembly of friends and officials 
from near and far, were formally dedicted. May 31, of this year. Prior to 
their completion and dedication, however, the college moved into them. 
In the early morning of March 7th, the birthday of the founder, Miss Lulu Frey, 
the group of students and teachers marched out in single file over the hills, 
each one carrying some precious or fragile possession of the college. The 

*On furlough. 



Union Colleges 77 

experience was indeed a moving one, for hearts were filled with emotion as 
they made the transition from the dear old home to the beautiful new one. 
A fitting service of prayer was held on the threshold of Pfeiffer Hall before 
they crossed it. 

Four buildings are still under construction. 1. The dormitory in three 
units under one roof and having a common kitchen. Two of the units are 
Mrs. Pfeiffer's gift; the third, that of the women of the United Church of 
Canada. It will accommodate 150 girls. They are moving in at this writing. 
2. The Kindergarten: provided by the Children's Thank-Offering of last year, 
and so intimately associated in our thought with Mrs. McKibben. 3. The 
English House — Mrs. Pfeiffer's gift. 4. The Home Economic Practice House — 
a model Korean home, provided by Dean Ava B. Milam and the Ewha 
Alumnae Association. 

We are further highly indebted to Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiffer for $50,000 for 
endowment, a substantial initial amount toward a permanent endowment 
for maintenance and up-keep. 

There are 225 students now in the college. Two hundred twenty-four 
have been graduated since its beginning twenty-five years ago. The Kinder- 
garten Training School, opened in 1914 and closely affiliated with the college, 
has 262 graduates and forty-eight students this year. 

Mrs. J. M. Avann. 

Woman's Christian College, Madras, India 

Principal — Eleanor McDougall. 

No W. F. M. S. Representative on the Faculty. 

There has come from Madras Christian College only good news during 
the past three years. The number of students is increasing annually and there 
is no great need for new buildings. Miss MacDougall who has been from the 
beginning the principal of the College will retire next year by age limit. Her 
success has been so marked and her influence so blessed on the lives of the 
young women of India that her retirement will occasion great sorrow. 

The Pundita Ramabai Memorial Scholarship has been given and a beauti- 
ful picture of this most distinguished Christian Indian woman has been pro- 
vided by the kindness of Mrs. David C. Cook of Elgin, Illinois. 

St. Christopher's Training College, Madras, India 

Principal — Nora Brockway. 

No W. F. M. S. Representative on the Faculty. 

The American Section of the Governing Board of Saint Christopher's 
Training College is able to report a steady increase during the past three years 
in the number of students and in the influence of the institution. The work 
done has been so excellent that there has been a definite appeal to the College 
to admit young men. This request has not been granted, however. Miss 
Brockway, the Principal, has sought to develop among students an ideal of 
self-help which is most promising. 

The college has received through the courtesy of the American Ramabai 
Association a gift of four thousand dollars toward the endowment of a pro- 
fessorship. Two other gifts of a thousand each have been received also. The 
students are attempting with the aid of the alumnae to raise another thousand 
which is a great endeavor for Indian young women. 

Vellore Medical College for Women, Vellore, India 

Principal — Dr. Ida Scudder. 

No W. F. M. S. Representative on the Faculty. 

The presence in America of Dr. Ida Scudder, head of the Vellore Medical 
School (which is rated as A 1 among medical schools of India) has been an 



78 In Lands Afar 

inspiration to the American Section of the Board of Governors. With Mrs. 
Henry W. Peabody she visited a large number of churches throughout the 
United States and presented the need of the Indian School. Due to an unfor- 
tunate combination of circumstances the amount of money received was small 
but it is hoped that there will still be a considerable sum given toward endow- 
ment for this most useful institution. 

Relating to All Three of the College Boards 

The resignation of Dr. James L. Barton made vacant the chairmanship 
of each of the Governing Boards in America. In his place three presidents 
were elected: 

Madras — Mrs. Mason R. Wood, Arlington, Massachusetts (Baptist). 
St. Christopher — Miss Mary Markley, Washington, D. C. (Lutheran). 
Vellore — Mrs. DeWitt Knox, New York City (Reformed). 

It is further desired that larger representation on the three Boards shall 
be granted by the participating societies, two to be elected for each Board 
instead of two to serve on all three Boards. 

Christian Literature 

Miss N. Margaret Daniel writes "The Tokiwasha Woman's Room in the 
Christian Literature Society Building on the Ginza, Tokyo, was dedicated in 
December, 1933. Miss Baucus and Miss Dickinson, our pioneers in publishing 
Christian Literature for Japanese women and children, chose the name Tokiwa 
for their magazine and hence Tokiwasha for the firm name. The pine sym- 
bolizes the meaning of the name in its unchangeableness. This room is a 
memorial to these two women. The Japanese call it lai Shitsu, Memorial Love 
Room. Above the bronze tablet hang their pictures and on the wall facing the 
street is a painting of a pine tree done by a Japanese artist. 

For twenty-five years Tokiwasha issued its publications from Yokohama. 
Now as a part of the Christian Literature Society it faces the new day and in 
new ways will find fulfillment of unchanging ideals. 

Yokohama — Here there is a fine corps of seven national women evangelists, 
four in the city and three in the district churches. These with Misses Winifred 
and Marion Draper serve the five churches in the city and the seven on the 
district. One fine worker has started a new line of work, a home for widows 
with little children where they can rent rooms at a nominal sum and have their 
children taken care of in the day nursery while they work. A neat little house 
with places for eight families has just been furnished and dedicated. 

Our school for the blind was the first in the country to be designed for 
children only. Recently a department for children of pre-school age has been 
developed. Miss Marion Draper's notable work in translation during the past 
four years is Kagawa's "A Grain of Wheat," though she has done much else, 
too. 

Chosen District — Seoul — Five cooking classes opened in 1931 and 
conducted since then by Eloise Smith have helped the girls and women in 
their home-making to give more wholesome food and add to the attractiveness 
of their home life. Miss Smith's appointment to Fukuoka leaves this splendid 
work uncared for. 

A well-built American house on Severance Hospital Compound has been 
leased for a missionary home, and occupied since May, 1934. Being centrally 
located it contributes much toward the efficiency of our evangelistic work. 

Within the last four years ten new Bible classes have been opened in the 
city, for young men, young men and women, and women. One church enrolls 
all the women of its membership into Bible study groups according to geo- 
graphical location. 



McDowell Fellows 79 

The first Christian kindergarten has been opened for Japanese children in 
a Japanese population of 100,000 in Seoul. It is the fulfillment of Miss 
Kitajima's vision and prayer. The first money for it was given to her by an 
American journalist who said, "Please use this in some way for missionary work 
in honor of my missionary mother." 

A summer camp is conducted along the seashore modelled after Camp 
Wesleyan at Northfield. An Interdenominational Sunday School Institute 
Camp has also been inaugurated. The members of every woman's society in 
every church become members also of the Missionary Society of the Japan 
Methodist Church. They hold an annual district woman's conference on one 
day of the annual district conference of the Japan Methodist Churches in 
Chosen. It is made an inspiring and instructive day for the women delegates. 

Visits were made by Miss Starkey and Miss Kitajima to Manchuria in 
1934 and again in 1935, where Japanese have poured in by the tens of thousands. 
Eleven important meetings were held in 1934 and thirteen the following year. 
"This is a most important time for evangelistic work among the Japanese in 
Manchuria and we must not fail our Lord there," writes Miss Starkey. 



McDowell Fellows in Service (as of 1933) 

Name Appointment 

Carleton, Mary (Sing Gieu).. . .Institutional Church, Foochow, China 

Chen, Carol, M.A Hwa Nan College, Foochow, China 

Chen, Lydia, M.D Gamble Memorial Hospital, Chungking, West 

China 
Chung, Mei Lien, M.A Day School Music Supervisor, Chinkiang, 

China 

D'Lima, Edith, M.A Stanley Girls High School, Hyderabad, India 

Ho, Janet, B.R.E Principal, Marguerite Stewart School, 

Futsing City, China 
Kim, Hamna, M.A Head of Home Economics Department, 

Ewha College, Seoul, Korea 

Kim, Helen, Ph.D Vice President, Ewha College, Seoul, Korea 

Kitajima, Tsuyu, B.R.E National Evangelistic worker among Japanese 

in Korea 

Lee, Beatrice M.A Knowles Training School, Kiukiang, China 

Li, Kwan Fang, M.R.E Literature Society, Shanghai, China 

Liu, Pearl Hinghwa Conference, China 

Peters, Jasmine Christian Girls School, Shahjahanpur, India 

Saw, Unsook Kindergarten Training School, Seoul, Korea 

Shih, Mary, R.N Sleeper Davis Hospital, Peiping, China 

Singh, Ethel Prem Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow, India 

Sung, Sioh Ging Huong, M.D. . .Hwa Nan College, Foochow, China 

Sung, Mildred Primary Supervisor, North Kiangsi and 

Hwangmei Districts 

Tang, Viola Rulison Girls School, Kiukiang, China 

Tseng, Hsiu Hsiang, M.A Head of Kindergarten Department, Yenching 

College for Women, Peiping, China 
Theodora Thomson Principal, Lucie Harrison Girls School, Lahore, 

India 

Tokunaga, Yoshi, M.A Happy Hill Girls School, Fukuoka, Japan 

Vincent, Shelomith, M.A Reform Work for Women 

Wei Sho Ying Hwa Nan College, Foochow, China 



80 In Lands Afar 

McDowell Fellows in Service (Continued) 

Name Appointment 

Wong, Pearl, B.A Hwa Nan College, Foochow, China 

Woo, Grace M.A Principal Rulison Girls School, Kiukiang, 

China 
Yen, Victoria Pon Nanking, China, President of the National 

Nurses Association of China 

Yuen, Yu Ying Conference Evangelist, Central China 

Youn, Mary (Sunk Duk), B.M. .Ewha College, Seoul, Korea 
Yu, Marie Wuhu City Work, Wuhu, China 

McDowell Fellows in Preparation (as of 1934) 

Name School 

Osaki, Sachiye Fukuoka Imperial University, Fukuoka, 

Japan 



AT THE HOME BASE 

BRANCH OFFICERS 

New England Branch 

President — Mrs. Charles S. Otto, 155 Robins Road, Watertown, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Wm.S. Mitchell, 100 Washington St., Maiden, 
Mass. 

Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. Adolphus Linfield, 29 Everett St., 
Watertown, Mass. 

Recording Secretary — Miss Elsie Searle, 5 Bryant Ave., Methuen, Mass. 

Treasurer — Miss Sophronia B. Rich, 20 Sargent St., Newton, Mass. 

Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Elmer Leslie, 228 Mason Terrace, Brookline, 
Mass. 

Secretary pf Field Support — Mrs. Wm. T. Carver, 446 Highland Ave., Win- 
chester, Mass. 

Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. A. G. Boynton, 422 Summer St., 
Stamford, Conn. 

New York Branch 

President — Mrs. Fred A. Victor, 488 Van Cortlandt Pk. Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Charles H. Hardie, 883 E. 19th St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 
Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. Berryman H. McCoy, 19 Prospect St., 

Trenton, N. J. 
Associate Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. Alexander S. McNear, 169 

Roseville Ave., Newark, N. Y. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Lawrence J. Munson, 88 Winthrop Street, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Clinton Morris, 9 Sunnyside Ave., Hempstead, N. Y. 
Receiving Treasurer — Mrs. Harry A. Crispin, 37 Chestnut St., Salem, N. J. 
Secretary of Field Support — Miss Mary Blake, 726 Rugby Rd., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Secretary of Literature — Mrs. James Lord, 530 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. William M. Young, 46 Magnolia 

St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Secretary of Extension Work — Miss Florence M. Calkins, 306 West Ave., 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Philadelphia Branch 

President — Mrs. Edward A. Bleckwell, 214 E. Sedgwick St., Mount Airy, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Elizabeth M. Lee, 400 Shady Ave., E. E., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Associate — Miss Juliet Knox, 7320 Brighton Road, Ben Avon, Pa. 
Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. Wm. H. Dievler, 7730 Union Ave., Elkins 

Park, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. W. T. Cooper, 230 Owen Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Curtis Sooy, Route 2, Box 64A, Willow Grove, Pa. 
Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. J. W. Masland, 1219 68th Ave., Oak Lane, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

81 



82 At the Home Base 

Secretary of Literature — Mrs. G. L. R. Thompson, 2308 Madison St., Wil- 
mington, Del. 

Secretary of Christian Stewardship, Miss Carrie M. Purdy. R. D. 2, North- 
umberland, Pa. 

Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. Arthur P. Zuck, R. D. 1, Erie, Pa. 

Baltimore Branch 

President — Mrs. Arthur C. Day, W. Pleasant Hill Rd., Owings Mills, Md. 
Corresponding Secretary Emeritus— Mrs. E. D. Huntley, Washington Grove, 

Md. 
Corresponding Secretary— Mrs. J. M. M. Gray, American University Campus, 

Washington, D. C. 
Secretary of the Home Base — Miss Lulie P. Hooper, 100 University Parkway, 

\V.', Baltimore, Md. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Hamilton A. Hooper, St. Paul Court Apt., 

Baltimore, Md. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Daniel L. Ennis, 309 Sixth St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 
Home Administration Treasurer — Mrs. Jas. Andrew, 2824 Maryland Ave., 

Baltimore, Md. 
Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. W. S. Dewhirst, 3906 Morrison St., Chevy 

Chase, D. C. 
Secretary of Literature — Mrs. S. A. Hill, 106 W. University Pkwy., Baltimore, 

Md. 
Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. Edgar Beckett, 2054 Woodberry 

Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
Secretary of Extension Work — Miss Lenore V. Wagner, 5600 Old Pimlico 

Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Cincinnati Branch 

President — Mrs. Clarence D. L.a.ylin, 1972 Indianola Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. C. C. Pe.\le, 869 Bryden Road, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. E. E. Gayer, 94 Wilson Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. C. C. Long, 3434 Darwin Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Receiving Treasurer — Mrs. Paul H. Seay, 1318 Duncan Ave., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

Disbursing Treasurer — Miss Lillian Hoffman, Navarre Bldg., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

Secretary of Field Support — AIrs. E. S. Andree, 2946 Montclair Ave., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

Secretary of literature — Mrs. C. A. Raymond, 234 W. Tenth Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio. 

Secretary of Christian Steivardship — Mrs. J. H. SuDLOW, Thornville, Ohio. 

Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. J. H. Blackburn, 1242 Ethel Ave., Lake- 
wood, Ohio. 

Northwestern Branch 

President — Mrs. R. L. Marquis, 3300 Oak Park Ave., Berwyn, 111. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Frank E. Baker, 719 Emerson St., Evanston, 

111. 
-Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. C. N. Timmons, 406 Fourth Ave., Sterling, 

111. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Ross Lake, 741 N. Lotus Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Treasurer- — Mrs. Edwin A. Starr, Crooks and Starr Rd., Royal Oak, Mich. 
.Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. H. E. Duttweiler, 14275 Saratoga Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. 



Branch Officers 83 

Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Charles Billheimer, 520 So. Grove Ave., 

Oak Park, 111. 
Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. S. A. Waterm.^n, 784*5 Eggleston 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. Wilbur M. Ale, 4075 Columbus Ave., 

Detroit, Mich. 

Des Moines Branch 

President — Mrs. Frank L. Wright, 707 N. Forest Ave., Webster Groves, Mo. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Otis Moore, Tipton, Iowa, R. F. D. 
Secretary of the Home Base — A-Irs. J. D. Bragg, 3666A Montana St., St. Louis, 

Mo. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Oilman Smith, 1238 29th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Treasurer — Mrs. F. R. Hubb.ard, 1422 29th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. D. Britton, Garden City, Mo. 
Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Loren M. Edwards, 6166 Kingsbury Ave., 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. H. M. Humphrey, Indianola, Iowa. 
Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. J. A. Lory, 3809 Third Ave., Sioux City, 

Iowa. 

Minneapolis Branch 

President — Mrs. J. R.\lph Magee, Hotel Commodore, St. Paul, Minn. 

Corresponding Secretary Emeritus — Mrs. F. F. Lindsay, 25 Seymour Ave., 
S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Leon Roy Peel, 607 Wesley Temple Bldg., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. F. L. Parso, Windom, Minn. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. S. W. Pinkerton, 716 Goodrich Ave., St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Treasurer — Mrs. C. W. Hall, 3206 .Second Ave., S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. B. L. Bummert, 2824 14th Ave., S., Minne- 
apolis Minn. 

Secretary of Literature- — Mrs. G. A. Geer, Wadena, Minn. 

Secretary of Christian Stewardship. — -Mrs. V. E. Mikkelson, 2643 Polk St., 
S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. Russell V. Blake, Blakewood, R.R. 2, 
Robbinsdale, Minn. 

Topeka Branch 

President — Mrs. Ralph S. Cushman, 1S39 York St., Denver, Colorado. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Ell.\ M. W.\tson, 1701 S. Seventeenth St., 

Lincoln, Neb. 
Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. E. Guy Cutshall, 4926 Madison Ave., 

Lincoln, Nebr. 
Recording Secretary— Mrs. Harry Stanley, 1115 Stanley Blvd, Wichita, Kan. 
Treasurer — Mrs. B. M. D.\vies, 314 Greenwood Ave., Topeka, Kan. 
Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. Lydia K. Andrew, 628 S. 27th St., Lincoln, 

Ne> r. 
Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Claude M. Gray, 302 No. 9th St., Garden City, 

Kans. 
Secretary of Chrisian Steivardship — Mrs. Howard Ne.al, 1426 N. Topeka, 

Wichita, Kans. 
Secretary of Extension Work — Mrs. Z. W. Gunckel, 221 S. First St., Blackwell, 

Okla. 



S4 At the Home Base 

Pacific Branch 

President — Mrs. B. Dudley Snudden, 3535 Sixth St., Riverside, Calif. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. J. K. Cecil, 530 Kellogg Ave., Palo Alto, 

Calif. 
Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. Jerome Seymour, 952 No. Lake Ave., 

Pasadena, Calif. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Fletcher White, 445 Georgina Ave., Santa 

Monica, Calif. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Emory A. Warner, 2237 Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
.Secretary of Field Support — -Mrs. J. J. Bryant, 1234 Atlantic Ave., Long 

Beach, Calif. 
Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. E. J. Clinton, 701 Taylor St., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Secretary of Extension Work^M.'R.s. Frank P. Flegal, 287 Euclid Ave., Oak- 
land, Calif. 

Columbia River Branch 

President— Mks. M. B. Parounagian, 2545 N.E. 26 St., Portland, Ore. 

Corresponding Secretary Emeritus — Mrs. A. N. Fisher, 328 Tenth St., Port- 
land, Ore. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. C. H. Van Meter, 4857 N. E. 8th Ave., 
Portland, Ore. 

Secretary of the Home Base — Mrs. C. D. Fletcher, 156 S. University St., 
Blackfoot, Idaho. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. F^ A. Hazeltine, 1331 S.W. 12 St., Portland, Ore. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Paul Edwards, 2605 S.E. Sherman, St., Portland, Ore. 

.Secretary of Field Support — Mrs. H. G. Bartow, 612 S. Pearl St., Tacoma, 
Wash. 

Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Alva Strausz, 2214 Summitview Ave., Yakima, 
Wash. 

Secretary of Christian Stewardship — Mrs. E. C. Newhan, Colfax, Wash. 

Secretary of Extension Work — Miss Ruth Whipple, Box 279, Vancouver, 
Wash. 



STUDENT WORK 

General Student Secretary 

Mrs. Howard M. LeSourd 

206 Waverley Avenue, Newton, Mass. 

Branch Student Secretaries 

New England — Mrs. Donald Wright, 33 Pierce St., Maiden, Mass. 
New York— Mrs. R. C. Osborn, 303 N. Aurora St., Ithaca, N. Y. 
Philadelphia — Mrs. Homer Renton, Tarentum, Pa. 
Baltimore— Mrs. Walter Kerr, 2219 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 
Cincinnati — Mrs. S. R. Dunham, 3909 Berkley Drive, Toledo, Ohio. 
Northwestern — Mrs. H. W. Bolinger, 2646 McDaniel Ave., Evanston, 111. 
Minne.\polis — Miss Gertrude Becker, Windom, Minn. 
Des Moines— Mrs. T. C. Stephens, 2024 So. Royce St., Sioux City, Iowa. 
ToPEKA — Mrs. J. J. Poundstone, 1705 Ames Street, Winficld, Kans. 
Pacific — 

Columbia River— Dean Ava Milam, Oregon State Agricultural College, 
Corvallis, Ore. 



Branch Officers 85 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

Secretary of Young People's Work 

Mrs. Albert E. Beebe 

54 Elmwood Place, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Branch Superintendents 

New England — Miss Mary C. Stewart, 204 Anthony Street, East Providence, 

Rhode Island. 
New York — Mrs. Ray L. Tucker, 228 Kingsbury Avenue, Elmira, N. Y. 
Philadelphia — Mrs. Pardee F. Day, 211 W. Berkeley St., Uniontown, Pa. 
Baltimore — Mrs. Foster B. Davis, 513 Walker Ave., Govens, Baltimore, Md. 
Cincinnati — Mrs. Cyrus C. Dash, 20S1 Mars Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio. 
Northwestern — Mrs. Clifford H. Newham, 106 So. Madison Avenue, 

La Grange, 111. 
Des Moines — Mrs. Emma Amburn Arnold, Chelsea, Iowa. 
Minneapolis — Mrs. E. E. Whiteside, Howard, So. Dak. 
TOPEKA— Mrs. John W. Gates, 1726 Laurel Ave., Topeka, Kans. 
Pacific— Mrs. David C. Shipley, 1848 Midvale Ave., West Los Angeles, Calif. 
Columbia River — Mrs. Paul H. Ashby, E. 634 — 23 St., Spokane, Wash. 

JUNIOR WORK 

Secretary of Junior Work 

Mrs. Carl F. New 

518 Old Orchard Road, Ten Hills, Baltimore, Md. 

Branch Superintendents 

New England — Mrs. Kenneth Reynolds, 9 Seneca Road, Winchester, Mass. 

New York — Miss Irma L. Baylis, Woodbury, Long Island, N. Y. 

Philadelphia — Mrs. S. V. Holmes, 201 Eleventh St., Franklin, Pa. 

Baltimore — 

Cincinnati — Mrs. J. R. Rowntree, 1264 Ashland Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 

Northwestern — Mrs. J. B. Schaub, 1040 Isabella Street, Wilmette, 111. 

Des Moines — ^Mrs. C. R. Cassell, 1208 Logan Avenue, Waterloo, Iowa. 

Minneapolis — Mrs. F. E. Malchow, Wilder, Minn. 

Topeka — Mrs. Lottie B. Spyker, 1241 Lincoln, Apt. 17, Denver, Colo. 

Pacific — Mrs. F. B. Sheldon, 45 Knowlesxvay, Stockton, Calif. 

Columbia River — Mrs. P. F. Pilcher, 935 Malaga St., Wenatchee, Wash. 

LIBRARY SERVICE 

Director of Library Service 

Miss Alice I. Hazeltine 

39 Claremont Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Branch Directors 

New England — Mrs. Elmer Leslie, 228 Mason Terrace, Brookline, Mass. 
New York — Mrs. James Lord, 530 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Philadelphia — Mrs. C. L. R. Thompson, 2308 Madison St., Wilmington, Del. 
B.\LTiMORE — Mrs. Harry A. AUers, 3903 Dorchester Rd., Baltimore, Md. 
Cincinnati — Mrs. G. L. Wilson, 1503 Hillside Terrace, Akron, Ohio. 
Northwestern — Mrs. R. L. Marquis, 3300 Oak Park Ave., Berwyn, 111. 
Des Moines — Mrs. J. D. Bragg, 3666 Montana St., St. Louis, Mo. 
Minneapolis — Mrs. G. A. Geer, Wadena, Minn. 

Topeka— Mrs. Claude M. Gray, 302 North 9th St., Garden City, Kan. 
Pacific — Mrs. J. G. Early, 314 So. Occidental Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Columbia River — Mrs. Alva Strausz,2214 SummitviewAve., Yakima, Wash 



86 



At the Home Base 



BRANCH ASSIGNMENTS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
CONFERENCES 

German 

East German, New York Branch. 

Swedish 

Eastern Swedish, New England Branch. 

Central District, Central Northwest Conference, Northwestern Branch. 

Northern District, Central Northwest Conference, Minneapolis Branch 

Western District, Central Northwest Conference, Topeka Branch. 

Pacific, California District, Pacific Branch. 

Washington District, Columbia River Branch. 

Norwegian- Da7iish 

Norwegian-Danish Conference, Minneapolis Branch. 
Western Norwegian-Danish, Columbia River Branch. 
Auxiliaries in Eastern United States to Branches in which they are 
located. 



MISSIONARIES SUPPORTED BY 



YOUNG PEOPLE 

New England 

Margaret I. Hermiston 
Faye Robinson 



JUNIORS 

New England 

Lois Curtice 
Clara Pearl Dyer 



EXTENSION 
MEMBERS 



New England 
Mildred Burton, M.D. 



New York 

Li BiCu, M.D. 
A. Edith Fredericks 
Emily Irene Haynes 
Maybel Holmes 
Lula A. Miller 
Azalia E. Peet 
Alice M. Powell 
Mabel A. Woodruff 



New York 

Edna L Bradley 
Lillian L. Holmes 
Mrs. W. C. Swearer 



New York 
Mrs. Alice H. Sharp 



Philadelphia 

Martha Daniels 
Jenny Lind 
Blanche Search 
Alberta Sprowles 
Martha Whiteley 



Philadelphia 

Mary F. Carpenter 
Margaret Crouse 
Agnes Dove 
Olive Given 
May Murphy 
Jennie Reid 



Philadelphia 

Helen Couch 
Rhoda Edmeston 
Ruth Greenwood 
Gwendoline Narbeth 



Baltimore 

Frances Roberds 
Laura V. Williams 



Baltimore 
Ruth E. Robinson 



Baltimore 
Leona Thomasson 



Missionaries Supported by Branch 



87 



Cincinnati 

Julia Bonafield 

Charlotte Brown lee 

Grace Davis 

Alice Fin lay 

Eva Hardie 

Trudy Schlaefli 

Fern Sin key 

Bertha Starkey 

Margaret E. Tucker, M.D. 

Ethel Wheelock 

Retta Wilson 



Cincinnati 

Dora Fearon 
Jessie Marker 
Gail Patterson 
Pearl Walrath 
Glora Wysner 



Cincinnati 

Elizabeth Alexander 
Catherine Baker 
Grace Hollister 
Ruth Hyneman 
Lela Kintner 
Grace Manley 
Bess L. Phillips 
Carolyn Teague 



Northwestern 

Anna Agnes Abbott 
Marie Adams 
Sylvia E. Aldrich 
Carol Chen 
Dr. Lien Ching 
Mary L. Deam 
Bernice E. Elliott 
Cora Fales 
Ruth Gabosch 
Ovidia Hansing 
Ava F. Hunt 
Myra A. Jaquet 
Ada M. Nelson 
Zola Payne 
Elsie I. Reik 
Wilhelmina Shields 
Bella Singh 
Beulah Swan 
Beatrice R. Terry 
Maren Tirsgaard 
Charlotte Trotter 
Lulu L. Tubbs 
Harriet M. Whitmer 



Northwestern 

Edna B. Bacon 
Irene Bear 
Maren P. Bording 
Elizabeth Hobart 
Bertha Alfrida Kostrup 
Mabel Morgan 
Caroline S. Peckman 
Rachel Peng 
Pauline A. Place 
Frances Quinton 
Adis Robbins 



Northwestern 

Bernita Block, M.D. 
Ruth Danner 
Victoria Lang 
Treva Overholt 
Marian Simons 
Ruth M. Wilson 



Des Moines 

Lahuna Clinton 
Jennie Jones 
Katherine Keyhoe 
Ortha M. Lane 
Ethel Ruggles 
Mildred Simonds 



Des Moines 

Blanche Bair 
Ola Dudley 
Anna Lulu Golisch 
Mary K. Metsker 
Mildred Pierce 



Des Moines 

Jennie Bridenbaugh 
Stella Dodd, M.D. 
Flora Quirin 



Minneapolis 

Gertrude Becker 
Ruth Harvey 



Minneapolis 

Cilicia Cross 
Wilhelmina Erbst 



Minneapolis 

Ona Parmenter 
Jessie Pfaff 



88 

TOPEKA 

Irma Collins 
Gladys Doyle 
E. Fern McCaig 
Harriet P. Morris 
Elsie May Power 
Ellen Smith 
Dora A. Wagner 



At the Home Base 



TOPEKA 

Blanche Apple 
Barbara N. Bailey 
Lillian P. Greer 
Eva Ostrom 
Mary Louise Perrill 
Myrtle Precise 
May E. Sutherland 
Hazel O. Wood 



TOPEKA 

Gertrude Byler 
Blanche McCartney 
Henrietta Doltz 



Pacific 

Agnes Dora Dunn 
Grace Pepper Smith 
Alice Whitney 



Pacific 

Rose Waldron 
Eleanor Stallard 
Freda Haffner, M.D. 
(part) 



Pacific 

Marguerite Decker 
Frances E. Johnson 
Freda Haffner, M.D 
(part) 



Columbia River 

Laura F. Austin 
Marie E. Church 
Bernice Cornelison 



Columbia River 

Lila Dingle 
Julia E. Morrow 
Mrs. Alice Kim Jung 



Columbia River 

Mary Bedell 
Edna Holder 



TERRITORY EMBRACED IN THE ELEVEN BRANCHES 

New England Branch — New England States. 

New York Branch — New York and New Jersey. 

Philadelphia Branch — Pennsylvania and Delaware. 

Baltimore Branch — Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and the Canal Zone. 

Cincinnati Branch — Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama 
and Mississippi. 

Northwestern Branch — Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin. 

Des Moines Branch — Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana. 

Minneapolis Branch — Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota. 

Topeka Branch — Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, New 
Me.xico, Oklahoma, Texas. 

Pacific Branch — California, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii. 

Columbia River Branch — Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon. 



THE OUADRENNIUM AT THE HOME BASE 

The past four years, without doubt, have been the most victorious as well 
as the most difficult in the histor}' of the Society. Calamities, catastrophies, 
financial ruin for many, criticisms of methods, scepticism as to the need for 
the work and even questionings of the very foundations of faith! But through 
all of these our auxiliary women, young people and children, led by district, 
conference, Branch and general officers following the banner of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, have come through triumphant. 

Within this terrifying period, there has been a loss in membership of a 
little less than twenty per cent and a loss in organizations of less than eight 
per cent. One division of the Society, the Wesleyan Service Guild, can report 
an increase in both units and members. How has this splendid record been 
made possible? First of all our women have held in their hearts the assurance 
that "With God all things are possible." They have had unwavering faith in 
his goodness and in their mission to carry his love through Jesus Christ to the 
women and children of the world. They have kept the Faith. Not easily! 
But joyously! 

In the first year of the quaiirennium they built their "Altars of Sacrifice," 
walking the streets in calico and wearing calico to their meetings that no woman 
might hesitate to attend because she could not dress in silk or wool. That 
year, 613 auxiliaries completed their "Altars" which meant meeting all the 
goals, including the desperately hard one of finance. That year, also, saw 
26,000 Methodist women in the Home and Foreign Missionary Societies band- 
ing together as "Fellow Workers for the Truth" to hold steady in their own 
faith and deepen the spiritual life of the Church. "Onward" was our slogan. 

In the second year, we went "Forward Together" through the dangerous 
"S Curves" of the way, following the directions of the only true Guide Book 
and building by the way the "Well of Salvation." Four hundred eighty-eight 
auxiliaries built their "Wells." In that year, in order to save money for the 
field, no program meeting of the General Executive Committee was held, but 
the Branches glorified their Branch meetings. Des Moines, Minneapolis, and 
Topeka held their Jubilee celebrations. Northwestern took sectional Branch 
meetings to its whole territory, 15,000 women attending, representing 1309 
auxiliaries. New York went without a printed Branch report and used the 
money saved to send out a new missionary. It was also the fiftieth anniversary 
of the founding of the German Work in our Society. After which they com- 
bined with the English-speaking conferences. 

The third year we were "Adventurers in Faith." We lighted the beautiful 
candles on the "Altar of Lights." One thousand two hundred twelve auxiliaries 
lighted every candle and 578 lighted all but one. Since the lighting of each 
candle meant the meeting of a goal this was a great achievement. During this 
year, in part to make up for what had been lost in interest by not having a 
public meeting of the General Executive the previous year, the brilliant sug- 
gestion of one of the officers was followed, the carrying out of a Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society Motorcade. This was made possible by the gifts 
of two women. One, Miss Ella May Carnahan, who had experienced so much 
of joy from her own membership in this Society that she longed for others to 
have that privilege, gave from her own personal income $1,100.00 that the 
Society might be able to finance this enterprise. The other, Mrs. J. D. Bragg, 
gave of her remarkable business ability as Director of the Motorcade. She 
took charge of all the multitudinous details of sending motor cars all over 
the country, each car carrying a general officer, a Branch officer, a conference 
or district officer and a missionary. To make arrangements for 275 meetings 
held from Florida to Minnesota, from the Atlantic to the Pacific was a tre- 



90 Jt the Home Base 

mendous task. But nothing was forgotten and no serious accident marred the 
undertaking. Meetings were held in every Branch with an attendance ranging 
from twenty-five to eight hundred; meetings of all kinds, luncheons, break- 
fasts, banquets, mass meetings, at noon, at night, at any time when the women 
could come and 16,428 new adult members were enrolled. By the close of the 
year, this figure had grown to 23,455. Cars drove thousands of miles, the longest 
record for one driver being 9,000 miles. Some general officers did not see their 
homes for weeks. Hundreds helped to carry out the plans but all "counted it 
pure joy." 

The fourth year found the women joyfuU)' facing "The Open Door." It 
had seemed that many forces were trying to close this door through which we 
were trying to take the Gospel to the world, but this year assurance came in a 
special way — "I have set before thee an open door and no man can shut it." 
So our women went through the Open Door "with singing." It was a joyous 
year! One thousand two hundred one auxiliaries met their goals in full and 
507 more met all but one. It was also a year of prayer for 1,421 prayer circles 
were formed. 

Through these four years, prayer and the consecration of personality and 
of money have undergirded all our work. The study of stewardship has been 
made possible through stewardship reading courses, the publication of steward- 
ship literature and the monthly presentation of stewardship in the auxiliaries 
The practice of Christian stewardship has followed the study. 

The textbooks published by the Central Committee on the United Study 
of Foreign Missions have been the basis of auxiliary programs for these four 
years. They show the range our special study has covered. They were, "Christ 
Comes to the Village" by Mary Schauffler Piatt; "Lady Fourth Daughter of 
China" by Mary Brewster Hollister; "Eastern Women Today and Tomorrow" 
by Ruth Frances Woodsmall, and "Japanese Women Speak" by Michi Kawai. 
Our own program material has been especially fine. We have stressed during 
this quadrennium variety in program building and a more earnest effort to make 
programs attractive and instructive. Leadership training has developed until 
last year 1,353 were reported as taking such a course. This has been one of the 
outstanding achievements of the four years. 

Library Service has still functioned, even on a reduced budget; college 
libraries on the field have been supplied with books and scientific and technical 
books have been sent to missionaries on request. There is not a complete list 
of all books sent to the field as they have been so many. Last year just from 
Pacific Branch alone over two tons of books were sent to Manila. One thousand 
thirty-two magazine subscriptions went to the missionaries as individual gifts 
from the auxiliaries. 

Our "Friends" have "never been better" according to the words of the 
readers themselves. The publication office in spite of the financial crisis and 
reduced subscription lists has still maintained its record of self-support. The 
present subscription lists number 91,983. 

There has been an awakening interest in world citizenship and the report 
comes that practically every Branch now includes this subject in one of its 
three phases — world peace, better movies, alcohol education — on its Branch 
program, and auxiliaries give one month a year to this study. 

The International Department which was created in the last year of the 
previous quadrennium has grown until now twenty-three countries are affili- 
ated with us as they through their own societies organize their women to work 
for the coming of the Kingdom in the whole world. Korea helps India, Latin 
America hears Macedonia's cry, etc. It has been a great aid to us in sustaining 
our own morale to learn of the enthusiasm of these fellow workers in other 
lands. 

Another source of help and interest has been the summer schools. Twenty- 
one interdenominational schools were reported last year with an attendance oi 



^uadrennium at the Home Base 91 

about five thousand, and twenty-three Methodist summer schools with an 
attendance of about the same number. More than one thousand of these were 
our Methodist young people. To have days together amid surroundings of rare 
natural beauty and studying such topics as are presented cannot but mean 
wonderful things in the lives of the girls and women and in the work of the local 
societies they represent. 

As to our departments, — the extension department still supports thirty- 
five missionaries and five nationals. The sun does shine. That is proved by the 
money that has come in through the Sunshine Bags to keep the sunshine 
ambulances going and the missionaries' cars running and some national 
workers at their teaching and preaching. During the quadrennium, 2011 
churches which before did not have a member of this Society have been reached 
by this department. The observance of Friendship Week helped much in 
gaining friends for our Society. 

The Wesleyan Service Guild still supports the work of Mildred Paine in the 
social settlement in Tokyo and the work of Mabel Nowlin in religious education 
in China. The Guild has recently been able to open a headquarters office in the 
plant of the First Methodist Church of Evanston, 111. In spite of the business 
conditions which have so affected business women, the Guild shows an increase 
in practically every line of its work. 

The student department has had 103 student centre committees func- 
tioning in college centres, making connection between the students and the 
Society. There have been very fine itineraries among some of the colleges by 
missionaries on furlough from colleges on the field. The student secretary has 
visited colleges in practically every Branch and summer institutes as far as was 
possible under the rules of the interdenominational organizations in charge of 
the institutes. There has been close co-operation with the national organization 
of Methodist college women. Kappa Phi. Attractive literature and program 
helps have been sent out to the colleges. 

The young people have had four busy and fruitful years. They have 
supported eighty missionaries. Their Thank-Offerings have amounted to 
$87,728.63 and have gone to help build the Methodist Girls School at Singapore, 
the Foochow Union Hospital and to aid in the support of nationals and the 
maintenance of the work during the crisis. Almost one thousand Mystery 
Missionar}- Mothers have each year helped to hold the interest of the young 
people in this work. Leadership training has been greatly stressed and atten- 
dance at summer schools has grown until it is difficult to secure complete 
reports. One year, 2500 of our j-oung people were in these summer school 
•groups. Affiliation with the Missionary Education Movement has been 
arranged during the last year so that more satisfactory textbooks for young 
people can be secured. Mrs. J. C. Shover has wonderfully guided our young 
people during this quadrennium. She now feels obliged to resign from this 
"work and her place is to be taken by Mrs. A. E. Beebe. 

The juniors have worked and played with other children of the world in a 
"Friendly Garden;" they have held a "Peace Parade" and built a "Friendship 
Village;" and they have made the "Map of Japan" more interesting by 
showing upon it how they met their goals. Their Thank-Offerings have gone 
to the building of the Gamble Home in Constantine, Algeria, to the 
kindergarten department of Ewha College, Seoul, Korea, to the building of a 
home for a missionary in Jagdalpur, India, and to the Melton-Young Me- 
inorial Centre in Nagasaki, Japan. The junior work has had changes during 
the quadrennium. Mrs. C. R. Havighurst who for thirteen years had gallantly 
led the juniors forward under the missionary banner felt obliged to resign. Her 
place was taken by Mrs. Frank M. McKibben, who for three years brought to 
this department the influence of a rare and beautiful personality. Just before 
the last meeting of the General Executive Committee Mrs. McKibben was 
suddenly "called heme." She had but just begun her work with our juniors. 



92 At the Home Base 

The loss to our work is very great. Her place will be taken by Mrs. Carl F. 
New. 

There have been other changes in our officiary during these four years. 
Death called also Miss Amy (j. Lewis who for eighteen years was the secretary 
of our general office in New York. She had previously been one of our mission- 
aries in Japan. Her place has been taken by Miss Ruth Ransom, formerly a 
missionary in Peru. Mrs. J. N. Reed, the home base secretary of Northwestern 
Branch, was called by death at the time of our mid-year meeting at Atlantic 
City four years ago. Her place was taken by Mrs. C. N. Timmons. 

Among our general officers there have been but two changes, Mrs. Lindsay 
felt obliged to resign from the chairmanship of the Home Department after 
fifteen years in that position. Mrs. C. L. Mead then became a vice-president 
with the duty of acting as chairman of that Department and Mrs. Lindsay' took 
Mrs. Mead's place as a vice-president-at-large. 

Among our editors there was but one change. Mrs. G. W. Isham after 
twenty years as editor of the "Executive Daily" felt that she could not con- 
tinue to serve in that capacity and Mrs. F. T. Enderis succeeded her. 

In the Foreign Department, Mrs. Franklin Reed succeeded Mrs. Lewis L. 
Townlev as secretary of the Department; Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell took the place 
of Mrs.'C. M. McConnell, of New England Branch; Mrs. J. K. Cecil that 
of Mrs. B. Dudley Snudden of Pacific Branch; and Mrs. C. H. Van Meter that 
of Mrs. C. VV. Henderson of Columbia River Branch. Miss Ella May Carnahan 
resigned as official correspondent for Europe and North Africa. 

The changes in the Home Department have included the following, — -Mrs. 
Adolphus Linfield took the place of Miss Clementina Butler who had been a 
member of the Department since its organization, representing New England 
Branch; Mrs. Wm. H. Dievler succeeded Miss Susan C. Lodge for Philadelphia 
Branch; Mrs. E. E. Gaver succeeded Mrs. F". T. Enderis for Cincinnati Branch; 
Mrs. E. Guy Cutshall became the successor of Mrs. H. E. Wolfe from Topeka 
Branch, and Mrs. Jerome Seymour took the place of Mrs. J. K. Cecil from 
Pacific Branch. 

Since the German Work had been merged with the English Conferences 
there was no longer the need for a secretary of German Work, so Miss Amalie M. 
Achard severed her connection with the Home Department after twenty years 
of remarkable service. 

Several other changes took place this year. In the Foreign Department 
Miss Carrie J. Carnaham who has been a member of this Department for 
thirty years, representing Philadelphia Branch, is succeeded by Miss Elizabeth 
Lee; Mrs. E. L. Harvey who served eighteen years representing Baltimore 
Branch is succeeded by Mrs. J. M. M. Gray. Mrs. J. M. Avann who has been 
an official correspondent in this Department for twenty years is unable to 
remain in this capacity but continues as correspondent for Ewha College. 

In the Home Department, Mrs. B. M. McCoy succeeds Mrs. Frank A. 
Home of New York Branch. 

Mrs. F. H. Sheets, 
Secretary of the Home Departments 



FINANCIAL HISTORY OF THE QUADRENNIUM 

The 1932 report of the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society noted the following significant facts: — "All appropriations have been 
paid in full. There is no indebtedness to banks or individuals. The deficits of 
1930-31 have been cleared. The net overdrafts made by Branches on the 
general treasurer amount to $116,250, only $36,000 more than the overdrafts 
twelve months ago. There has been a decline of 18.8 percent in the total 



^luadrcnnium at the Home Base 93 

collections but the fact that the foreign exchanges in which our bills must be 
paid have been greatly in our favor has made it possible to bridge the gap of 
$392,000 created by lessened receipts and to pay missionaries, national workers 
and current work appropriations in full at the agreed rate of exchange." 

The report presented October 1, 1933, says: "Collections represent a 
decrease of $435,408.74 (or 25.73 per cent) from the collections of the previous 
year. This is, nevertheless, a truly remarkable showing in view of the financial 
and economic conditions prevailing throughout the United States. The Society 
has no bank loans nor debts to individuals, nor have any of its Branches any 
indebtedness except overdrafts on the Society itself. Appropriations to the 
foreign field have been paid in full on a reduced basis except in the case of two 
Branches, one of which paid only 60 per cent of its second quarter's appro- 
priations and another 80 per cent of those of the fourth quarter. At the 
beginning of the year a 10 per cent reduction in missionary salaries and a 15 
per cent reduction in current work items was made. In Ala^', the financial 
trend indicated the need for still greater reduction if the budget were to be 
balanced. Hence the reduction on missionary salaries was increased to 15 
per cent and that on current work to 30 per cent. These heavy cuts were 
accepted with amazing cheerfulness and a splendidly co-operative spirit. The 
wisdom of making them has been proved by the fact that the fiscal year has 
been closed without debt. Despite foreign exchange losses, where we confi- 
dently hoped for gains, despite economic turmoil and uncertainty, the Society 
has won through, free of debt, with its trust funds intact, its budget balanced." 

Nineteen hundred thirty-four marked the turn of the tide, with an increase 
of $69,000, over the collections of the previous year. Branch overdrafts increased, 
however, to $230,000. Appropriations to the foreign field were paid on the 
same reduced basis as in the latter half of 1933, salaries being 85 per cent of 
the 1932 figure and current work appropriations 70 per cent. The 1934 
treasurer's report stressed four points: 

First — In a year when it seemed impossible to do it, the Society made an 
increase in collections. 

Second — After many j'ears in which it was necessary to concentrate much 
attention on the increase of material plant, attention was given increasingly 
to the spiritual phases and values of the Society's work as distinguished from 
buildings and equipment. 

Third — Retired missionaries were cared for as probably few organizations, 
business or benevolent, have been able to do, with a cut of only 5 per cent. 

Fourth — The investments of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
were unimpaired and trust funds fully protected. 

Nineteen hundred thirty-five emphasized again the upward trend with an 
increase of 6.1 per cent in total collections. The collections for the quadrennium 
are as follows: 

1932 $1,692,327.37 

1933 1,256,918.63 

1934 1,326,275.00 

1935 1,407,915.18 

a total of $5,683,436.18 compared with $9,692,079.29 received in the previous, 
quadrennium. Many and violent have been the changes in financial conditions 
the world over. The period began with large exchange gain to the Society, was 
continued through the devaluation of the dollar resulting in exchange losses 
in most of the countries in which the Society operates. The present outlook is 
uncertain e.xchange-wise, but momentarily, at least, far less stormy than in 
recent years. 

Changing conditions in the world of investments have led to an interesting 
change in the Society's investment methods. The increasing volume of 
annuity or life income gifts have been protected by reinsurance of every life 



94 At the Home Base 

income in a strong life insurance company. Five companies have been chosen 
for reinsurance purposes, so that risk is distributed and the maximum pro- 
tection afforded. The pensions of all missionaries now receiving retirement 
allowances have been similarly reinsured and policies are being purchased 
through payment of annual premiums sufficient to cover pensions payable at 
the proper time to all missionaries now in active service. The investible funds 
remaining to the Society, after the insurance purchases above noted, are 
secured by AA or AAA bonds legal for investment of trust funds in New York, 
New Jersey or Massachusetts. Investment losses represent only a fraction of a 
per cent of investible funds. 

No missionary has been called home for lack of funds. Branch overdrafts 
on the general treasury (totalling $248,000, at the end of the quadrennium) 
are underwritten by funds in hand or shortly to be received. The Branches 
are thus free of debt, as is the Society at large. Approximately $8,000,000 
worth of real estate abroad is free of any encumbrances and there is no field 
indebtedness. 

A thorough-going scientific revision of the Society's entire budget is in 
progress. Its purpose is to adapt expenditures in the most perfect way to 
changed and changing conditions abroad; to discover and inaugurate new 
types of work suited to the present day and to discard old types which have 
outlived their highest usefulness. This study, it is earnesth' hoped, will result 
in making the budget a more flexible tool, a more efficient medium for carrying 
the ideals of Christian women to the women of non-Christian lands. 

Florence Hooper, Treasurer. 



REPORTS 



COMMITTEE ON BY-LAWS 
Adopted Changes in By-Laws 

By-law I (a) Change the fifth paragraph to read: In case of a vacancy 
occurring ad interim in representation on an interdenominational board, the 
chairman of the Department that nominates the representative or representa- 
tives on the board concerned shall, after consultation with the chairman of the 
nominating committee of her Department, if such committee exists, appoint a 
representative for the remainder of the year. 

By-law V. After "for the purpose of" insert "nominating three delegates 
to serve on the committee of nominations and;" delete "they represent;" 
making the paragraph read as follows : 

The recording secretary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society shall 
organize the delegates to the General Executive Committee into a conference, 
which shall hold at least three sessions for the purpose of nominating three 
delegates to serve on the committee of nominations and considering measures 
for the promotion of the interests of the work in the Branches. They shall 
attend the public meetings and such sessions of the Foreign and Home Depart- 
ments as may be open to them. When important changes or new by-laws are 
to come before the General Executive Committee, a copy of the same shall be 
presented to the delegates on the day previous. 

By-law VI (c). For "our own" substitute "the Methodist Episcopal;"^ 
making the paragraph read as follows: 

The purpose of its maintenance shall be to (a) serve as a bureau of general 
information regarding the work of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
at home and abroad; (b) serve as a central agency for those interests common 
to all Branches which can be more effectively and economically conducted 
through such a center; (c) form the point of contact between the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and other organizations of related interest in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and in other denominations; (d) render assistance 
to outgoing and returning missionaries; (e) serve in other lines as determined 
by the standing committee on general ofhce. 

By-law XVI, Section 3. Insert in second paragraph after first sentence, 
"No building, however financed, shall be erected on the property of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society without the approval of the field property 
committee and without consultation and mutual agreement with the Foreign 
Department."; making the paragraph read: 

It shall be the duty of the field property committee to (a) have in charge, 
under the direction of the Foreign Department of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society, all matters relative to the purchase and sale of property, 
erection and insurance of buildings, and extensive repairs for which appro- 
priations have been made. No building, however financed, shall be erected on 
the property of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society without the approval 
of the field property committee and without consultation and mutual agreement 
with the Foreign Department. After a building has been authorized by the 
Foreign Department, the property committee shall appoint a local building 
committee, which shall have authority to draw up plans, make contracts, 
subject to the approval of the property committee, audit bills, and direct the 
work ; 

By-Law XVI, Section 4. Insert after first sentence, "The Bishop of the 
area shall be a member ex-officio." Change the word "Those" in next sentence 
to "Others;" making the paragraph read: 

95 



96 Reports 

4. Field Reference Committee — Each woman's conference shall have a 
field reference committee to be elected annually by ballot. The Bishop of the 
area shall be a member ex-ofificio. Others eligible to membership in the field 
reference committee shall be (a) active missionaries of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society; (b) such wives of missionaries of the Board of Foreign 
Missions as are in charge of work for the Society, and (c) national women 
workers if declared eligible by the woman's conference. This committee shall 
consist of not less than six nor more than nine representative members, two- 
thirds of whom shall be missionaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society. The treasurer of the woman's annual conference, mission conference, 
or group of conferences shall be, ex-officio, an additional member of this 
committee without vote except in the conference of which she is a member. 

By-law XXIII. After "members from the Foreign and Home Depart- 
ments shall" insert "be nominated by their respective Departments and shall." 

After the second sentence insert "the three delegates shall be nominated 
by the delegates conference as soon as possible after the General Executive 
Committee convenes." 

After "and standing committees" delete "which shall consist of com- 
mittees." 

Before "and such other committees" delete "nominations." Rearrange 
names of committees to follow alphabetical order thus: "and standing com- 
mittees on by-laws, consultation with the Board of Foreign Missions, general 
office, investments, state of the Society." 

After "and such other" insert "standing;" making the paragraph read: 

1. On Nominations — There shall be a committee on nominations com- 
posed of two members from the F"oreign Department and two members from 
the Home Department, these to constitute a standing committee and, when 
the General Executive Committee convenes, three delegates shall be added to 
serve during the session. Members from the Foreign and Home Departments 
shall be nominated by their respective Departments and shall serve two years 
each, one new member from each Department being chosen annually. The 
three delegates shall be nominated by the delegates' conference as soon as 
possible after the General Executive Committee convenes. It shall be the duty 
of this committee to present nominations for the officers for the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society, the general counselor, auditor of the accounts of 
the general treasurer, and standing committees on by-laws, consultation with 
the Board of Foreign Missions, general office, investments, state of the Society, 
and such other standing committees as the General Executive Committee shall 
from time to time determine. 



ACTIONS OF GENERAL OFFICERS 

Ad Interim, 1934-1935 

Acting under authority conferred upon them by the by-laws of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the 
general officers of the said Society voted: 

That the schedule of annuity rates proposed by the Conference on Annuities 
be approved, the same to be put into effect when they have been adopted by 
all of the General Benevolent Boards of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
including the Committee on Annuities of the World Service Commission, and 
whenever they have been approved by the American Bible Society and one 
other major denomination. 

To ask Mr. Roszel C. Thomsen of Baltimore, Maryland, to serve for the 
ensuing year as general counselor of the Society. 

To authorize and empower Florence Hooper, treasurer of the said Society, 
to sell and assign the following United States securities registered on the books 



General Officers 97 

of the Treasury Department in the name of or assigned to the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church: — 

Federal F~arm Loan (The Federal Land Bank of St. Paul) 1937-57 issued 
May 1, 1927— 4,1^— Serial Number M350430. Denomination $1,000. 

And to ratify and confirm any and all assignments of the above described 
United States securities, heretofore or hereafter made by the above-named 
officers. 

To approve the following names for the committee to define the duties of 
committees, Mesdames Peel, Bragg, Dievler, Hardie, Shover, and Cecil. 

To authorize and direct Evelyn Riley Nicholson, president, and Eloise A. 
Woolever, secretary of the said Society, to sign an agreement to sell and to 
convey in fee by special warranty deed and clear of all encumbrances, all the 
coal of the Pittsburgh or River Vein underlying certain tracts of land in Center 
and Jackson Townships, Greene County, Pennsylvania, which tracts of coal 
are known as the Hargus Creek Block, and the undivided interest in said block, 
hereby agreed to be sold aggregating forty-one and two-thirds (41%) acres 
more or less, and being the interest in said block of coal, devised to the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society under the will of Asenath H. Pershing, 
late of the city of Pittsburgh, Pa., deceased. 

Together with the mining and other rights and privileges owned by the 
said Asenath H. Pershing which were inherited by the said Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church from the Estate of 
Asenath H. Pershing, deceased. 

To approve the meeting together of Miss Bailey of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society and Miss Wheaton of the Woman's Home Missionary 
Society to prepare a joint program, the expense to be divided equally between 
the two Societies. 

That whereas, Mary Elizabeth Kerr, late of the County of Multnomah, 
State of Oregon, by her last will and testament, duly admitted to Probate in 
the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Multnomah, among 
other legacies therein contained, did give and bequeath unto said Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the sum of 
One Thousand Dollars; said bequest so therein provided for to be paid from the 
sale of the real property unto the said estate belonging: 

And whereas, the only real property unto the said estate belonging con- 
sists of Lot Two (2), Block Five (5), Clifford Addition to Albina, appraised 

the sum of $2,400.00 

andLot 10, Block 4, Central Albina, appraised at 1,000.00 

Total appraised value of real property $3,400.00 

And whereas, since the death of the said Mary Elizabeth Kerr, the value 
of said property so appraised has greatly depreciated, and it is unlikely that 
said properties so directed to be sold can be disposed of for a sum fully sufficient 
for the payment of said bequests; 

And whereas, C. C. Miller, the duly appointed, qualified and acting 
executor of the Last Will and Testament of the said Mary Elizabeth Kerr, 
deceased, has heretofore received an offer of the sum of $1,500.00 for the said 
property so described as Lot 2, in Block 5, ClilTord Addition to Albina, and has 
made acceptance of said offer, and the sale thereof has heretofore been fully 
approved and confirmed by order of the above mentioned Court; but the deed 
therefor is as yet undelivered; 

And whereas, in the opinion of the general officers, the said sum, so offered 
is not disproportionate to the present value of said property, and a sum greater 
thereof, by ten per cent, exclusive of the costs of a new sale cannot be procured 
therefor; 

The sale of said property for and at the agreed consideration of Fifteen 
Hundred Dollars ($1500.) so offered be approved and confirmed. 



98 Reports 

To authorize and direct Florence Hooper of Baltimore, Maryland, treasurer 
of the said Society to sell and assign and transfer twenty-six (26) shares of the 
six per cent preferred stock of the Southern California Edison Company 
Limited, represented by certificate No. ND5940 and eight (8) shares of the 
seven per cent preferred stock of the Southern California Edison Company 
represented by Certificate No. ND 2603. 

To approve securing Mr. Charles Fahs, Curator of the Missionary Re- 
search Library, at an expense of not more than Fifteen Hundred Dollars 
($L500) to make a thorough study of the problems and outlook of the Society 
and to submit suggestions looking to the further development of the work. 

To authorize Annie G. Bailey, publisher, to draw on the $5,000 reserve 
fund in order to carry the office expenses until September with the understand- 
ing that the amount be repaid if possible. 

To authorize and direct Evelyn Riley Nicholson, president, and Eloise A. 
Woolever, recording secretary of the said Society, to sign an agreement to 
extend to October \, 1935, the option given May 13, 1935 to Frank E. Merts 
of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, on certain coal lands in Center and Jackson 
Townships, Greene County, Pennsylvania, inherited by the said Society from 
the estate of Asenath H. Pershing, deceased. 

To authorize and direct Florence Hooper; treasurer of said Society, to sell, 
assign and transfer 185 shares of the preferred stock of the United States Steel 
Corporation now standing in the name of said Woman's Foregin Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Eloise A. Woolever, Recording Secretary. 



ACTIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TAKEN 
ON RECOMMENDATION OF THE UNIT MEETING 

Ad Interim 

It was voted: That a letter of appreciation be sent to Mrs. Henry PfeifTer 
for her generous gifts totaling $154,000 to Ewha College. 

That on March 28, which is Commencement Day at Ewha, a cable of 
congratulation be sent to the college. 

That a letter of greetings and congratulations be sent to Jo Gakko, 
Fukuoka, Japan, on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary in 1935. 

That a letter and telegram be sent to President Roosevelt protesting the 
naval maneuvers in the Pacific. 

That as individuals we send our protests to Secretary Cordell Hull, 
Senator Key Pittman, and the President concerning the naval maneuvers and 
the huge naval and military appropriations. 

That in 1936 a regular public program be given at the General Executive 
Committee meeting which is to be held in the Northwestern Branch. 

That the Branches be requested to suggest to their delegates that they 
consent to postpone their services as delegates to the 1935 General Executive 
Committee meeting until the 1936 meeting of the Committee.. 

That the recommendation from the Home Department that Mrs. Shover 
and Mrs. McKibben, with Miss Ransom as alternate, be elected as Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society representatives to the Missionary Education 
Movement, be approved. 

That the president appoint a member to serve on the interdenominational 
committee to consider how the request of the Hartford Group to be sent to 
China as a unit and to be supported interdenominationally might be answered. 

That the recommendations of the committee on International Depart- 
ment be adopted.* 

* See Actions of the International Department. 



Committee on Investments 99 

Annual Meeting, 1935 
That greetings of the General Executive Committee be sent to Miss Anne 
E. Lawson of India who fifty years ago was presented as a missionary candidate. 
That a message of love and sympathy be sent to Miss Sinclair who is ill 
in the Springfield Hospital. 

That the Society contact the Day of Prayer Committee asking for united, 
earnest, and immediate prayer for the peace of the world. 

Eloise a. Woolever, Recording Secretary. 



ACTIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

TAKEN ON RECOMMENDATION OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON INVESTMENTS 

It was voted: 1. To confirm the changes in the by-laws XX and XXI 
made by the committee on investments in accordance with the authorization 
of the General Executive Committee meeting of 1934 and incorporated in 
1934 report as follows: 

"By-law XX, section 7: Gifts received on the life income plan shall be 
invested and reinvested during the life-time of the donor by the treasurer of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society under the instruction of the committee 
on investments, except such portions of said life income gifts as shall be re- 
quired to purchase from life insurance companies approved by the committee 
on investments, annuity policies to cover the life income payable to the donor. 

"By-law XXI, section 9: There shall be a Retirement Fund for care of 
retired missionaries, consisting of gifts solicited for this purpose throughout 
the Society. Such gifts as are definitely designated for endowment shall be 
invested and reinvested by the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society under the instruction of the committee on investments, the principal 
being preserved intact and the income only being used to pay retirement allow- 
ances or to purchase pensions from insurance companies, approved by the 
committee on investments. Such gifts as are not definitely designated for 
endowment may be used for purchases of pensions from insurance companies, 
approved by the committee on investments, or for such other purposes involved 
in the retirement care of missionaries as by action of the General Executive 
Committee shall be authorized from time to time." 

2. That whereas it is our desire to have the Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the United States make payments to us of the annuity instalments 
under our annuity contracts heretofore issued, and also under any annuity 
contracts issued in the future by the said Society, without our first furnishing 
proof to the said Assurance Society of the survival of the annuitants on the due 
dates of the annuity instalments, 

Florence Hooper, treasurer, is hereby authorized to execute in the name 
of and in behalf of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, an undertaking and agreement with the Society to refund 
to the said Society any annuity instalments that it has paid to us to which we 
are not entitled by reason of the death of any annuitant prior to the due date of 
any such annuity instalments. The said undertaking and agreement to cover 
any instalments heretofore paid to us under any annuity contract heretofore 
issued and also any instalments paid to us under any annuity contract hereafter 
issued to us by the said Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. 

3. That the gifts margin of life income gifts made to the Society as such, 
after the purchase of insurance policies to cover the guaranteed life income, be 
set aside and invested and reinvested as reimbursement to the treasury for 
advances made prior to October 1, 1934 to Branches of the Society in order to 
enable them to maintain their current work appropriations. 

Eloise A. Woolever, Recording Secretary. 



100 Reports 

ACTIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

TAKEN ON RECOMMENDATION OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Ad Interim 

It was voted: That greetings be sent to the missionary societies in the 
conferences of China and that we assure them that as soon as their constitution 
is developed and adopted, we shall be happy to have them affiliate as a national 
Unit. 

That Miss Gabrielson be informed that although she cannot include 
Germany in her itinerary, we ask her to use the $50.00 forwarded to her for 
emergency purposes as she sees best. 

That greetings be sent to the Mexican Unit; also to the Argentine Unit 
from whom $10.00 has been received for use by the International Department, 
and that appreciation and congratulations on their achievements be expressed. 

Annual Meeting, 1935 

It was voted: That Miss Achard be subsidized to the amount of $200 from 
International Department funds, to carry on her promotional work with the 
Central Europe Unit and the German-speaking constituency in this country. 

That the committee be given permission to appropriate a sum not ex- 
ceeding $200 for promotional work and literature in Scandinavia if, upon 
further correspondence, it seems necessary. 

That $79.55, balance of the gifts received for German Emergency Relief, 
and any gifts which may be received later, be appropriated by the International 
Department as it deems best in aid of the work of German missions. 

Eloise a. Woolever, Recording Secretary. 



ACTIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
TAKEN ON RECOMMENDATION OF THE HOME DEPARTMENT 

Ad Interim 

It was voted that the plans as presented in the "Annual Message" and the 
young people's and junior material for leaders be approved. 

Literature. That the pages in the "Friend" entitled "Among Ourselves" 
be continued another year. 

That the manuscript which Mrs. Nicholson has written at the request of 
the Society on the development of the International Department be printed 
and used as a basis for an auxiliary program in 1936, and included in the budget. 

That five or six short leaflets for "free" distribution be printed, these to 
be of general interest. 

That the literature committee be given authority to prepare a packet of 
literature to put into the hands of the wives of theological students and of the 
deans of these schools. 

That a packet of inexpensive picture cards for use in work with Little 
Light Bearers be printed and included in the Little Light Bearers leaders' 
material. 

That programs be prepared for union societies, Miss Bailey, Mrs. Shover 
and Mrs. McKibben to co-operate with those designated by the Woman's 
Home Missionary Society for this work. 

That we reaffirm our loyalty to the Central Committee on the United 
Study of Foreign Missions and pledge the use of its book for women's societies 
and the story book for children. 

That $300 be allowed from the Home Administration budget as an 
affiliation quota to the Missionary Education Movement and, as this will 



Home Departtnent 101 

entitle our Society to two representatives, that our representatives be those 
who are especially qualified to assist and counsel on preparation of young 
people's and junior texts and materials. 

That we accept with deep gratitude the generous offer of Dr. Rollin H. 
Walker to give to our Society for two years the royalties on his new book, 
"Paul's Secret of Power," with the understanding that we shall include it in 
Branch reading courses and promote its use and sale as far as possible. 

Wesleyan Service Guild. That the apportionments to the Wesleyan 
Service Guild continue to go through the home base secretaries. 

That we approve including four types of membership on the Wesleyan 
Service Guild report blanks — active (paying full dues), co-operating (interested, 
attending meetings, not paying full dues), associate (men), and permanent 
(payment of $50.00). 

That we approve the program and choice of text-book of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild for next year, Dr. Barclay's "World Mission of Christianity." 

Student Work. That a new booklet be prepared setting forth the work of 
the student department, to be financed from the student budget. That a 
leaflet be prepared for the auxiliary women stating what the women can do 
for the student work and what it can do for them. 

That the Kappa Phi tithe which is to be assigned to the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society this year, be given to one of three projects to be suggested 
by the Foreign Department. 

That Miss Saito be our representative to the Kappa Phi i\nnual Council 
to be held in Bemidji, Minn., June 21-28, 1935. 

That our major emphasis next year through the student department be 
the promotion of Sister Colleges, as far as possible one college being assigned 
to each Branch. 

Young People's Department. That there be printed an International 
Department leaflet for the young people's department, consisting of stories 
of our work in foreign countries, to be used in connection with the one cent 
International Department tax and that this leaflet be placed in the young 
people's budget. 

That we call the attention of the home base secretary to the advisability 
of sending an outstanding Standard Bearer to the Branch meeting. 

That in 1936-37 the young people's department study Africa, supple- 
mented by stories from the "History." 

Junior Department. That Branch junior superintendents co-operate with 
the Branch administrator of the Missionary Leaders Training Course in 
promoting the use of this study course among the junior leaders. 

That the Branch provide the recommended supplementary religious 
education reading, the following methods being suggested: 

1. A circulating library. 

2. As district awards. 

3. By urging local auxiliaries to provide books. 

4. By having missionary education books included in the Branch 
reading course. 

That the Thank-OfTering project this coming year be the steamship 
passage mone\' for missionaries. 

That the textbook for next year be "The Three Cornered Continent" by 
Margaret Applegarth and that the book for Little Light Bearers be "Around a 
Mexican Patio" by Ethel Smithers. 

Extension Department. That Friendship Week be continued and that it 
shall not have a financial appeal. 

That we reprint the leaflet by Mrs. Cronk, "Shut In but not Shut Out." 

That the Branch extention secretaries be guests of the General Executive 
in their turn. 

That the Comrade Plan be adopted by the extension department for 
1935-36. 



102 Reports 

Stewardship. That a Stewardship Reading Course be included in the goals, 
consisting of the "Stewardship Spokesman" and the stewardship page in the 
"Friend." 

That the use of the stewardship candles be continued. 

That a stewardship demonstration be given at one program during the 
year, either in the auxiliary or at a church night meeting. 

That the leaflet "Christian Stewardship in the Life of the Church Today" 
which contains a list of resource material be sent to each auxiliary with the 
"Annual Message." 

That we express our sincere appreciation for the faithful and effective 
work which Mrs. Waterman has done during the years she has edited the 
stewardship page in the "Friend." 

That the Stewardship Reading Course be incorporated in the Branch 
Reading Course. 

I fiter denominational Interests. That Mrs. H. E. Woolever be appointed 
as alternate on the Central Committee for the remainder of the present vear. 

That Mrs. J. C. Shover and Mrs. F. M. McKibben with Miss Ruth 
Ransom as alternate be our representatives in the Missionary Education 
Movement. 

That the appointment of Mrs. H. M. LeSourd as delegate from New 
England Branch to the Northfield Summer School be approved and also the 
appointment of Mrs. B. H. McCoy by Xew York Branch to the same school. 

General Office. That when a missionary or national is brought to this 
country for an interdenominational itinerary, plans for the itinerary be made 
by the general ofifice. 

That a loan library be started at the general office for missionaries on 
furlough in memory of Miss Amy Lewis, each Branch to make an annual 
appropriation towards this library of at least one dollar. 

That Miss Ransom as secretary of the general office be authorized to sign 
checks. 

That a mimeograph be purchased for the general office at a cost of thirty 
dollars. 

That Miss Ransom be asked to gather the names and addresses of retired 
missionaries and keep them on file in the general office. • 

Miscellaneous. That we hold a regular public program meeting of the 
General Executive Committee in 1936 as the guests of Northwestern Branch. 

That the delegates be excused from attendance at the St. Louis Meeting 
of the General Executive Committee. 

That Miss Lulie Hooper and Mrs. F. F. Lindsay be the Home Department 
members of the Hwa Nan Committee. 

That where there are joint societies or where church da3's are held, we 
urge the local president of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society as a 
representative of the world citizenship committee to co-operate with the local 
Christian citizenship secretary of the Woman's Home Missionary Society to 
present world citizenship adequately. 

That we purchase 6,000 copies of the book "Thinking It Through" for 
$100 from the Methodist Book Concern. 

That the travel and entertainment expenses of the chairman of the world 
citizenship committee to the meeting in St. Louis be paid from the general 
treasury. 

That a leaflet report be printed next year for Negro Conferences. 

That the "Ciuidance Sheets" for auxiliary programs based on the "Friend,' ' 
prepared by Miss Bailey, be sent to Negro auxiliaries as far as possible to 
guide them in their programs, home base secretaries of the Branches having 
Negro Conferences to be responsible for supplying Miss Bailey with the mailing 
list. 

That we recommend to auxiliaries where there are theological schools 



Home Department 103 

nearby the auxiliary plan for friendly contact with the wives of theological 
students. 

That Miss Florence Hooper be asked to prepare a report blank for Branch 
treasurers to report overhead expenses in such a way as to distinguish between 
administrative expenses and expenses for education and promotion. 

That the Mid-Year Meeting be held at Columbus, Ohio, in 1936 at the 
time of the General Conference. 

Actions Taken at the Annual Meeting, 1935 
Literature. To nominate Miss Effie A. Merrill as editor of the "Woman's 
Missionary Friend" with a salary of $1800 and an office budget of $989; 
Miss A. M. Achard as editor of the "Frauen-Missions-Freund" with a salary 
of $475; Mrs. James H. Lewis, as editor of the "Junior Missionary Friend" 
with a salar}' of $600; and Miss A. G. Bailey, publisher and editor of "Litera- 
ture" with a salary of $2400. These to be paid from the funds of the pub- 
lication office. 

That a grant of $225 be made to Mrs. G. \V. Isham from the funds of the 
publication office for work in connection with the "Friend" and for research. 
That the action taken at Washington be reconsidered — "That for one year 
we take as our textbook the history of our Society being prepared by Mrs. 
Isham and that this with supplementary leaflets on Africa be our study book 
for 1936-37." 

That our textbook for 1936-37 be the one on Africa and that there be 
included in the program a dramatization based on the history for Founders' Day. 
That the price of the history be $1.00 retail, and the binding blue and 
gold, the colors of the organization. 

That Mrs. Isham be brought to General Executive Meeting next October 
as a special guest. 

That the history be ready for sale at General Conference in Columbus, 
May, 1936, and the dramatization based on it be presented as a feature of our 
anniversary program if practicable. 

That the sum of $250 usually placed in the home administration budget 
for printing a quadrennial report be used for illustrations for the history as we 
believe this amount will be used for more lasting benefit in this way than by 
printing a booklet report on the organization's work for the quadrennium. 

That we call the attention of the Branches to the suggestion made some 
time ago on the subject of sending copies of all literature to the home base 
secretary as soon as possible after receipt of the same at the depots of supplies, 
also of supplying departmental literature to the secretaries of the respective 
departments, and that the expense be borne by the Branch treasury. 

That we call attention to the demonstration, "Friends Ahoy" based on 
the "Junior Friend" as a part of the June auxiliary program and also recom- 
mend its use as publicity for the "Junior Friend" at district conventions, etc., 
this to be free to the Branches from Miss Bailey's office. 

That we call attention to the successful use of the cover reduction of the 
"Friend" for program covers for Branch meetings, etc. and recommend its 
widespread .use during the coming months, Miss Bailey being willing to furnish 
it to the Branches as a part of "Friend" publicity. 

That we concentrate during the next six months on very definite promotion 
of Dr. Rollin Walker's splendid book "Paul's Secret of Power." 

That we reaffirm our action taken at mid-year regarding the bringing up 
to date by Mrs. Sheets and Mrs. Woolever of the reports on work during the 
years when printed reports were omitted from the Year Book and that this 
report be printed in the Year Book for 1935. That the annual reports given 
by Mrs. Woolever and Miss Hooper be omitted from the Year Book for 1935 
inasmuch as the material will be included in the above report. 

That the usual leaflet report be published and that the cost (approximately 
$375.00) be included in the home administration budget. 



104 Reports 

That the expense of packets for the wives of theological students be paid 
from the home administration budget. ($25.00.) 

Student Department. That Mrs. H. M. LeSourd be nominated as general 
secretary of student work for 1935-36 with a budget of $1080. 

That we send a representative to the Student Volunteer Convention and 
that Mrs. LeSourd be this representative with expenses from the budget of the 
student department. 

Wesleya?! Service Guild. That Mrs. M. N. English be nominated as secre- 
tary of the Wesleyan Service Guild with a budget of $1,000. 

That the home base secretaries make an effort to secure conference guild 
secretaries in the conferences that have three or more units. 

That the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society bear half of the expense 
of the conference guild secretaries — these expenses to include necessary sta- 
tionery, postage and travel. 

That the three representatives of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society on the Central Committee, Mrs. C. N. Timmons, Mrs. J. M. Avann 
and Mrs. F. E. Baker be continued. 

Young People's Department. That the resignation of Mrs. J. C. Shover 
be accepted with deep regret and with sincere appreciation of the constructive 
program and of the consecrated service which she has embodied in her work. 

That the nomination be approved of Mrs. A. E. Beebe as secretary of 
young people's work. 

That the budget for the young people's department for 1935-36 be $500. 

That the Standard Bearers co-operate with the Methodist Youth Council 
in such a way as not to lose their identity and to safeguard our financial obliga- 
tion. 

That the young people's superintendents attend Executive in 1936 at the 
expense of the general treasury. 

That Mrs. Beebe be one of our representatives in the Missionary Educa- 
tion Movement. 

Junior Department. That we express our appreciation of the great privilege 
that has been ours in working under the leadership of so rare and beautiful a 
spirit as Mrs. McKibben and that we are convinced that her influence will 
continue to be felt not only in our missionary circles but around the world. 

That we approve the nomination of Mrs. Carl F. New as secretary of 
junior work with a budget of $200. 

That very general use be made of the three leaflets recently written by 
Mrs. McKibben, "Little Hands Outstretched to Bless," "To Leaders of King's 
Heralds," and "To Leaders of Little Light Bearers." 

That the 1935-36 plans for Leadership Training be continued through 
1936-37. 

That the mother auxiliaries organize and cultivate the junior work in their 
churches and that they have some form of joint program, party or meeting 
with them this year. 

That a budget of $25.00 be provided from the general treasury for the 
editor of the "Junior Friend" with which she may purchase books, magazines 
and such other material as shall be helpful in her work. 

That Mrs. Lewis be our representative on the curriculum committee. 

That Mrs. New be one of our representatives in the Missionary Education 
Movement. 

That with deep appreciation of the far-reaching influence of Mrs. 
McKibben in behalf of children everywhere our Society make some gift to the 
World Friendship Library for juniors that is being planned by First Church of 
Evanston as a memorial to Mrs. McKibben. 

That we participate in the Alma Palmer McKibben World Friendship 
Library and approve the appointment of a committee composed of General 
Executive members living in Evanston, they to choose their own chairman. 



Home Department 105 

Interdeiiominational Interests. That, in view of present baffling world 
conditions threatening the peace of the world, we recommend that (1) we call 
our constituency at home and abroad to definite prayer for peace; that we 
inform Miss Florence G. Tyler of our action, expressing the hope that other 
denominations will join to make this a united action, channeling this desire 
through the World Day of Prayer agencies, that Christian women of the world 
may be united in their approach to our only source of help, the mighty Coun- 
selor and Prince of Peace. (2) That this be done at once on the home base, by 
setting apart a period for prayer at all district and auxiliary meetings and 
wherever women are gathered; and that where practicable special groups be 
called together for prayer. 

To approve the nomination of Mrs. J. C. Shover as our member of the 
Central Committee on the United Study of Foreign Missions. 

That we appoint as delegates to the Foreign Missions Conference — With 
expenses from their budgets: Mrs. Thomas Nicholson and Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf ; 
With expenses from the general treasury: Mrs. J. K. Cecil and Mrs. Wm. H. 
Dievler, alternate — Mrs. C. L. Mead. Without expenses: Mrs. McCoy, Mrs. 
Gray, Mrs. Shover, Miss Watson. 

Note: By action of the General Executive Committee the following were 
added as delegates, without expenses: Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Mrs. Carl F. New, 
Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Frank E. Baker, Mrs. Albert E. Beebe, Miss Edith 
Fredericks. 

That in case any of these members cannot attend, Miss Ransom select 
substitutes from the committee members in or adjacent to New York. 

Bi-lingual Work. That we approve the intent of the ruling of the 1930 
General Executive in regard to Swedish Work, that the conference or division 
secretary of Swedish Work in whose Branch the General Executive shall be 
held be recognized as a consulting member in the meetings of General Executive 
and that her expenses be provided from the general treasury. 

That the division secretary in Northwestern Branch as consulting member 
for 1936, be asked to prepare for publication such a report of Swedish Work 
in America as shall be deemed necessary on vote of the conference and division 
secretaries, the expenses for publishing the same to be provided by the Swedish 
constituency. 

That for the coming year Mrs. Edward Brechlin of Duluth, Minn., be 
requested to collect reports of all Norwegian-Danish Work in this country and 
prepare them for presentation at the General Executive Meeting of 1936. 

Stewardship. That Mrs. J. Homer Slutz be the editor of the stewardship 
page in the "Friend." 

That the stewardship department have one-half page each month in the 
"Friend." 

That this year the secretary of stewardship in each Branch be urged to 
promote the use of Dr. Rollin H. Walker's book, "Paul's Secret of Power" since 
we recognize that this Power of which Paul speaks is the foundation of 
stewardship. 

Miscellaneous. That we reaffirm the following action taken at the mid-year 
meeting 1934 — "That as women vitally interested in the missionary program 
of the whole Church we recommend that the Society- express its approval of 
the 'cent-a-meal' project suggested by the Board of Foreign Missions and that 
the Society express its desire to co-operate in this educational effort." 

That Miss Ruth Ransom be nominated as secretary' of the general office. 
That the extra room adjoining Room 710 available at a cost of $100.00 a 
year be secured for the use of the general office. 

That the budget of the general office be $6,640 for 1935-36. 
That we secure a list of outstanding Negro speakers and speakers ac- 
quainted with Negro work available for Branch programs, this list to be kept 
in the general office. 

That we co-operate with the Board of Foreign Missions in the exhibit at 



106 



Reports 



General Conference, and that we allow a maximum of $300 for our participa- 
tion in the exhibit. 

That Mrs. C. B. Smith be appointed as our member of the exhibit 
committee. 

That Mrs. Mead be requested to send these actions to Dr. Diffendorfer. 
That Cincinnati Branch be asked to have entire charge of the sale of 
literature at this exhibit for our Society. 

That Miss Alice Hazeltine be nominated as director of library service. 
That Mrs. Woolever be appointed as reporter to the Christian Advocate 
and Miss Merrill to Zion's Herald. 

That Mrs. Seymour serve on the committee on memorials to General Con- 
ference and Mrs. Timmons as the Home Department member on the committee 
on General Conference legislation. 

That Mrs. Dievler be the new Home Department member on the 
nominating committee for 1935-36. 

That the Circle of Remembrance be continued and Mrs. Barber be con- 
tinued as secretary-treasurer. 

That the beautiful Chinese banner sent from the field as one of the 
Anniversary gifts to the Society be presented to Mrs. Pfeiffer in appreciation 
of her interest in the work of the Society. 

That the rules (appearing on page 215) for the expenses of the General 
Executive and Mid- Year Meetings be approved and printed in the Year Book. 
That the following Home Administration Budget be approved: 
For 1935-36. 

Expense of General Executive $3,000.00 

Expense of Mid-Year 4,000.00 

Expense of Interboard and Union College Meetings . . . 2,500.00 

Expenses of General Officers 6,600.00 

Medical Department and Shipping Bureau of Board of 

P oreign Missions 400.00 

General Office. 6,640.00 

Young People's Department 500.00 

Junior Department 200.00 

Editor of "Junior Friend" for helps 25.00 

Student Department 1,080.00 

Wesleyan Service Guild 1,000.00 

Home Department miscellaneous 300.00 

Foreign Department miscellaneous 1,000.00 

Share Plan Letters 225.00 

Auditor 200.00 

Bond 62.50 

World Citizenship Committee 150.00 

Foreign Missions Conference 3,100.00 

R.R. and S.S. Bureau 100.00 

Missionary Education Movement 300.00 

Library Service 50.00 

Safety Boxes and Legal Expense 1,075.00 

President's Emergency Fund 150.00 

Year Book 700.00 

Museum 50.00 

General Conference 450.00 

Leaflet Report 375.00 

Leaflets for Theological Students 25.00 

Cuts for History 250.00 

Miscellaneous 200.00 

Total $34,707.50 

Mrs. F. H. Sheets, Secretary of the Home Department. 



Foreign Department 107' 

ACTIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
TAKEN ON RECOMMENDATION OF THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT 

The following actions of the Foreign Department taken from the close 
of the annual meeting of the General Executive Committee, 1934, to the close 
of the annual meeting, 1935, were reported to the General Executive Com- 
mittee and confirmed by it : — 



General Actions 

It was voted that Mr. Fahs should continue his relations to the Society 
and that the general treasurer be authorized to pay him the sum of $200 
a month for a period of seven months. 

That the India and China Committees may each have a meeting before 
May at such place as well be least expensive, such meetings to be financed 
from the general treasury. 

That an educational grant of $200 for study in the United States be given 
to Miss Pearl Chiang, a Chinese girl from Chengtu, West China Union Uni- 
versity, from the McDowell Fellowship Fund. 

That subject to the approval of the field reference committee, $300 be 
granted to Mary Carleton for study in the United States, this amount to be 
paid from the McDowell Fellowship Fund. 



India 

It was voted that we approve the change of Miss Mary Boyde's appoint, 
ment from West China to India and her sailing this fall. 

That we pay our share of the budget of the campaign committee on 
Christian Colleges in India not to exceed $250. 

That the work of Raipur District, Central Provinces Conference, India, 
be discontinued. 

That the evangelistic work be closed as soon as practicable. 

That the school be closed not later than the end of the current school year. 

That the property be sold at the price which in the judgment of the field 
reference committee is the best obtainable. 

That the names of patrons honored in the school be transferred to other 
projects, so that the interests of the Branches involved may be conserved. 

That current work appropriations to Raipur be discontinued April 1, 
1936, except as inescapable obligations may require their continuance. 

That since Nettie Bacon may need to return to this country at the end 
of a three year term for family reasons, the New York Branch treasurer be 
authorized to pay her only $125 per quarter for the next three years, and shall 
hold the rest of her salary in a fund to provide her passage in this emergency. 

To authorize a cable to Bishop Badley, telling him that we have voted 
the return to Gujarat before July 1, 1936, of Misses Heist, Newton, Rose and 
Austin. 

That we approve the general plan presented by the field reference com- 
mittee of Bengal Conference namely: that the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society give Mt. Hermon School with all its assets, liabilities and responsi- 
bilities to an Inter-Mission Board, whenever arrangements can be made 
satisfactory to all parties concerned. 

That upon receipt of a definite proposition which among other details 
shall include the composition of the Inter-Mission Board, we take further 
action. 

That Miss Hooper be authorized to issue powers of attorney necessary 
for the consummation of the sale of the Raipur property. 

That we gladly accept the plan presented by the field reference committee 



108 Reports 

that Mt. Hermon School, from the beginning of the school year in 1936, take 

over the support of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society missionaries 

in the school. 

That the following cablegram to Bishop Robinson and Miss Ruth Field 

be authorized: 

"General Executive approve general plan Mt. Hermon transfer to 
Inter-Mission Board. Further action awaits definite proposal. Approve 
school paying three missionary salaries beginning April 1, 1936." 
That the salary of the doctor at Puntamba now included in "Tulsa 13," 

be set at $500. 

That, after conference with the general treasurer, a sum not to exceed 

Rs. 3700 be released from the reserve fund of Burma Conference for the purpose 

of starting a pension and annuity fund for the retirement of Bible women. 



Isabella Thoburn College Committee 

The treasurer reported a balance of $10,176.23 in the building fund. 

Voted that Miss Hooper be asked to write Mrs. Boyd assuring her of our 
appreciation of her offer to give one-tenth the total cost of the proposed new 
chapel if the remaining nine-tenths are secured, — the chapel to cost $25,000 
to $50,000, also assuring her of our active effort to secure the sum needed. 

That Miss Hooper interview an architect to ascertain the type of a plan 
he could develop for $25,000 to $35,000. 

China 

The candidate committee recommends that Miss Eunice Elizabeth Smith 
be accepted to meet the need in Foochow Conference. 

That Dr. A. Evelyn Leadbeater, who has had one term in medical work 
in Korea, be assigned temporarily (probably for one year) to Sleeper Davis 
Hospital, Peiping, China, subject to the agreement of the field reference 
committee. 

Resolved that the question of government registration of Sleeper Davis 
Hospital, of Peiping, China, be left to the judgment of Miss Ruth Danner, and 
the field reference committee, with the recommendation that, if possible, they 
defer registration until after General Executive Meeting in the Fall. 

Voted that we, the field reference committee of Kiangsi Woman's Con- 
ference, submit the following plan for Knowles Bible Training School, with our 
recommendation for adoption, to the Foreign Department of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society, through the secretary, Mrs. Franklin Reed, due 
to the absence of the ofiicial correspondent, making notation that in order to 
speed up action the matter be sent to all members of the Foreign Department 
immediately, and asking for cable report of the Foreign Department action. 

That for the present, Knowles shall keep two years of preparatory work 
gradually eliminating this section within the next five years, if possible. 

That the present Bible school 1, 2, 3, be registered with the Government 
as a vocational school (it being understood by us that Bible is required in 
each class and that this section is to be registered on J^ of the appropriation 
for Knowles Bible Training School plus students' fees in this department). 

That there be a strictly Bible school of three years with diploma un- 
registered, with entrance from our own vocational school, from junior high 
school, or the equivalent. 

That there be added to this Bible school, at least one year of post-graduate 
work in Bible and Religious Education, and that it be made an A grade Bible 
school as soon as possible, it being understood that as the preparatory work 
is eliminated its appropriation shall be added to the Bible school. 



Foreign Depart?nent 109 

Re solved thaX the Foreign Department of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church hereby authorizes the sale of the 
property located in Taianfu, China, known as the Davis School Teachers 
Residence, West suburb of Taian, Cheng Ch'uan Street north end of street, 
east side. Bounded on the east by the property of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church (General Board); on the west by the street; on the south by the 
property of Miss Hsu, purchaser, and on the north by the property of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

That the said Foreign Department hereby authorize Florence Hooper, 
treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, to issue the necessary power or powers of attorney in the 
name of the said Society, to enable the completion of the sale above authorized. 

That Miss Edith Fredericks be appointed central treasurer for China of 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
her term of service to begin when Miss Bessie A. Hollows, now central treasurer, 
leaves Shanghai. That on or after the assumption of her duties as central 
treasurer for China, Aliss Fredericks may open accounts in the name of the 
said Society with such banks throughout China as she may deem necessary 
and expedient. 

That in case of the death or disability of Miss Fredericks, Miss Julia 
Bonafield be authorized to act as central treasurer for China for the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church until other or 
different action is taken by the Foreign Department of the said Society. 

That the special gift of $1300 now in the hands of the treasurer be released 
for repair of buildings in Hinghwa Conference. 

That because of present conditions we are forced to say we cannot allow 
the $5000 for a new day school building in Futsing. 

That the ofificial correspondent contact the field reference and property 
committee of Kiangsi Province concerning the sale of the Ida Kahn Memorial 
Hospital for women and children at Nanchang. In connection with the dispo- 
sition of the building a part of the proceeds shall be used to establish a fitting 
memorial for Dr. Ida Kahn. 

That during the first six months of 1936 a special grant of $200 Mex. be 
made on the salary of each missionary in China. That for the first six months 
of 1936 a special emergency appropriation be made to each of the China 
Conferences from Branch exchange gain equivalent to one-sixth of the present 
current work appropriation in Mexican dollars, this appropriation to be used 
in no case for new projects but only temporarily to supplement salaries of 
nationals and work appropriations of institutions because of extra expense 
incident to the low price of silver. 

The distribution shall be made by the field reference committee of each 
conference to specific individuals and institutions in a proportion as nearly as 
shall seem wise, equivalent to the original appropriation. The funds for these 
emergency appropriations shall be obtained by the central treasurer for China 
by charging against the exchange gain of each Branch an amount in Mexican 
dollars equivalent to one-sixth of the current appropriation of the Branch 
reckoned in Mexican dollars at 2 to 1. Thus if the appropriation is $2,000 gold, 
$4,000 Mex., the amount charged shall be $666.66 Mex. 

That because of the extreme emergency in which we find ourselves, we 
regret our inability to grant the $1,000 for the purchase of the land at Dsen 
Jai Ngai to provide a safe and proper entrance for this compound. 

That the Chungking Memorial Hospital balances, now on the field, and 
those occurring during the ensuing year be used according to the discretion of 
the field reference committee of the West China Conference to cover deficits 
within the conference. 

That the Hitt Training School be closed as of date July 1, 1936; that 
all work appropriations other than staff salaries cease as of the same date; 



no RepoJ-ts 

that the nationals on the staff be re-assigned to other school work for one 
additional year (July 1, 1936 and June 30, 1937), their further relationship 
to the Society and its schools to depend upon the continuation of these schools, 
upon the approved work and adaptation of the nationals (transferred from the 
Hitt Trainir g School) in their rew situations. 

That the work of the Scciety at Taianfu be closed immediately. That 
the $1700 gold saved by North China for public health work but included in 
the $11,000 China balances which are called back for general budget adjust- 
ment, be replaced from the work appropriations for Taianfu. That of the 
remainir g Taianfu appropriations ($2618 gold) $1,318 be applied to the So- 
ciety's budget adjustment, and that $1,300 be used for program advance in 
North China. Money totalling $1,318 be taken as follows out of the following 
appropriations. 

Des Moines Branch $42.00 

Topeka Branch 248.50 

Columbia River Branch 84.00 

Minneapolis Branch 75.00 

Northwestern Branch 868.50 

That the Society's properly at Taianfu be not disposed of pending the 
emergence of mere defiriie policies on the part of both Board and Society 
with reference to the future development of the work at Shantung. 

That in view of the fact that the two missionaries from West China will 
be coming home, summer of 1936, for retirement, we ask that these vacancies 
be cared for — one by transfer of a nurse from North China, — the other a 
replacement by a new candidate. 

That in response to a request from Mintsing for permission to erect a 
home economics practice house from funds on the field, we reply that we cannot 
grant permission for this or similar buildings elsewhere at this time, in view 
of the fact that a complete revision of our entire budget is now in process and 
that we wish to have the new program fully in mind before authorizing 
additions to present plants. 



HwA Nan Board of Trustees 

The regular Board of Trustees meeting was held in the Hotel Kingsway, 
St. Louis, Mifsoiri, en Ccicber 24. 

In view of the followirg preliminary statement the committee presented 
for approval several recommendations: 

"The growirg trend in Chinese educational circles is at this time clearly 
away from co-education. The Educational Commissioner in Foochow advises 
against both co-education in college work and against the move of the college 
to the proximity of Fukien Christian University. Negotiations entered upon 
for such a move have not progressed advantageously and a satisfactory site 
has not been found." 

Recommended' 

1. That in view of all the facts it is inexpedient to make further effort at 
this time to move Hwa Nan from its present site. 

2. That whatever development of Hwa Nan can be achieved at its present 
site shall be vigorously sought. 

3. That an approach be made to the American Board with reference to 
the possibility of the high school of that Board being regarded as the 
high school of both missions, the Society's high school being closed, 
to leave the field clear for the American Board School. 



Foreign Department 111 

4. That if it be desirable in order to make it possible for the American 
Board to carry its larger load of high school work the Society lend to 
the American Board the services of one or two of its missionaries now 
teaching in our hi^h school. 

5. That in return, we ijivite the American Board to lend to Hwa Nan 
one or two teachers for the college. 

6. That we welcome the suggestions from the Church Missionary Society 
that one of the English lady missionaries might be available for 
teaching at Hwa Nan. 

7. That Magaw Hospital building and our high school building, when 
vacated be made available to Hwa Nan. 

8. That these proposals are all to be regarded not as mandatory but as 
suggestions commended to Bishop Gowdy and to the Hwa Nan Board 
of Directors. 

9. That the interest on the Endowment Fund be sent to Hwa Nan semi- 
annually. This will amount to $824 a year. 

10. That the 1937 young peoples' Thank-Offering apply on an endowment 
fund, the interest therefrom to apply on science equipment, especially 
strengthening the work in home economics. 

11. That the current work budget for Hwa Nan be continued as last year. 

Japan 

Voted that in view of the very great need of Kwassui College for addi- 
tional land for necessary playing field and the fact that Chinzei Gakuin through 
its move to another site has vacated just such land as is needed by Kwassui, 
this land being just across the street from the Woman's College, and further, 
in view of the fact that the Society has offered to put the use of a number of 
its medical properties in China at the disposal of the Board of Foreign Missions 
for medical purposes, it was voted to ask the Board of Foreign Missions 
whether it may not be practicable for the Board to put the Chinzei land that 
has been vacated at the disposal of the Society for a series of years, say five, 
until the Society may find resources for its purchase. 

That the present appropriation of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society for Sendai District of Yen 2450 be reduced on the following scale: 
for 1936-1937 Yen 1920 of the appropriation be used in Sendai after which it 
be decreased at the rate of Yen 240 per year for eight years. 

That $129 released bythe Sendai reduction in appropriations be transferred 
to the Joshi Shia Gakko (Women's Department Theological School), Tokyo. 

That out of the 17,000 Yen released from the sale of property at Sendai, 
3500 Yen be l,eft in the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society treasury in 
Japan, to be allocated in five or more annual payments to the appropriations 
of Sendai District, the remainder of the 17,000 Yen (13,500 Yen) be brought 
to the United States to apply on the general budget reduction. 

Korea 

Voted to approve the recommendation of the field that Wonju be closed 
as a resident station and the property sold; that the appropriation $270 for 
the social evangelistic center be dropped from the appropriations as of 
Jan. 1, 1936. 

To co-operate with the Presbyterians and the Methodist Church South, 
to form a small committee in the United States to conserve the interests of 
the social evangelistic center in Seoul. 

That in view of the present critical situation in the Korean Methodist 
Church the East Gate Hospital be continued at least for another year. 



112 Reports 

EwHA College 

Recommended that a room in the new dormitory of Ewha College be 
named in honor of Mrs. Clifford Myers of Cincinnati in consideration of a 
legacy of $1,000. 

That we authorize the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society to make a loan of $8,000 at 4 per cent to the Co-operating Committee 
of Ewha College. This loan being secured by items already promised and to 
be repaid in the next four years. 

Malaya 

In the process of working toward complete self support which we expect 
will be attained in the not distant future we propose that as a first step in 
that direction and in addition to the present 30 per cent cut, we further curtai I 
current work appropriations by an added cut of 10 per cent of the 1935 ap- 
propriations bearing in mind that this action is predicated upon keeping faith 
with the British Government in their demand that a missionary teacher shall 
be supported by us in each of our seven schools. 

Foted that the field reference committee study their budget in the light 
of the need for reductions in appropriations and that they be requested to 
make a 10 per cent reduction. 

Mexico 

Voted, That the $10,000 released by the closing of the Mexico schools be 
applied to the reduction of the general budget of the Society; that the remainder 
approximately $7,000 be left in Mexico for evangelistic work, literature, the 
Industrial School if it is able to open, etc. We request the field reference com- 
mittee to send us a detailed report of their suggestions for the reallocation of 
funds, the use and possible sale of property; that Mrs. Diefendorf, Miss Hooper 
and Miss Knox be appointed with power to approve the allocation of funds for 
1936. 

That $3,460 of the Mexico appropriations be transferred to North Africa; 
That Miss Elsie Shepherd be made the treasurer of Mexico; 
That the present rate of exchange in Mexico be continued for another year; 
To reaffirm the action taken at the Mid-Vear meeting reading as follows: — 
That under the present Mexican laws it is our judgment that the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society cannot use any of its appropriations 
for the support of a primary, secondary or normal school, all of which have 
to be recognized by the Government ; therefore we direct that schools of the 
above classes, now functioning, be closed as of the end of the present 
school year. Where this action closes schools which are using our property, 
we would approve the use of such property for hostels, social service work 
or such types of education as do not require government recognition. 



Burma 

Resolved, That Miss Hazel Winslow be appointed treasurer for Burma of 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
her term of service to begin at once. 

That on and after the assumption of her duties as treasurer for Burma, 
Miss Hazel Winslow may open accounts in the name of said Society with such 
banks in Burma as she may deem necessary and expedient and further that 
she may authorize any person or persons being missionaries of the said Society 
to operate such accounts. 



Foreign Department 113 

Philippine Islands 

Voted, That the general treasurer be authorized to pay from the Edith I. 
Gale Memorial Mission Fund the cost (beginning October 1, 1935) of medical 
supervision at the Mary J. Johnston Hospital, Manila. 

In view of the conditions of poverty and rapidly growing Christian Church 
in the Philippine Islands, we think it unwise to propose any reduction in 
appropriations at this time. 

Sumatra 

Considering the probability that we are to be released from the support 
of two missionaries who are to be taken over by the Swedish Church, we 
recommend that no further reduction be considered at this time. 



North Africa 

Voted, That the Society shall continue its work in North Africa. 



Italy 

Voted, That Baltimore Branch continue the salary of Mrs. Ruese for at 
least another year; that Mrs. Ruese be requested to pay 150 lira a month 
toward her living expenses, any additional expenses to be paid by the general 
treasurer. 

South America 

Voted, That Katherine M. Donahue of the East South America Conference 
be assigned to Crandon Institute, Montevideo upon her return to the field. 

That Miss Ruth Wilson be retired with no salary allowance, her home 
salary to be paid by Northwestern Branch until July 1, 1936. 

That Gleason Institute and Colegio Norte Americano in Rosario be closed 
as of the end of this school year if possible; of the $9,301, released by this closing 
$3,000 be transferred to social work in Buenos Aires; that both properties be 
sold at the earliest possible date, the treasurer to issue the necessary powers 
of attorney to consummate the sale. Cable authorized. 



Relating to Missionaries 

Voted, Upon unanimous recommendation of the candidate committee, 
that Miss Florence Stevenson, nurse, be accepted and that she be assigned to 
Kiangsi Conference; 

Upon unanimous recommendation of the candidate committee that Miss 
Marion Derby be accepted, and that she be assigned to Crandon Institute, S. A. ; 

Upon unanimous recommendation of the candidate committee, that Miss 
Mary Shearer be accepted as a candidate and assigned to China. It was 
further voted, that Miss Shearer be sent, for one year, to the Hartford School 
of Missions, her expense to be paid from the McDowell Fellowship Fund; 

That Miss Dorothy Stevenson be accepted as a contract teacher and sent 
to Malaya. Miss Stevenson will be the second one of the three voted sent to 
Malaya in Evanston, March, 1935; 

That Alma Elvira Erickson, nurse, be accepted and that she be assigned 
to West China as a replacement ; 

That the treasurer be authorized to send cable to Bishop Welch regarding 
the Misses Knox, Fredericks, Danner and Battin. 

Resolved (The candidate committee recommends) that Miss Martha 



114 Reports 

Gertsch be accepted as a candidate subject to an entirely satisfactory medical 
report, and that she be one of the three missionaries voted sent to Malaya by 
the Foreign Department at Evanston, April, 1935. 

Resignations Accepted: 
New York Branch — H. Isabel Latimer. 
Baltimore Branch — Lillie M. Rockwell, September, 1935. 
Cincinnati Branch — A. Beta Scheirich, Beredene Krill, Edna Van Fleet, 
-Mabel Frees, Florence Kleinhenn. 

Des Moines Branch — Dr. Clara B. VVhitmore. 

Minneapolis Branch — Mary A. Johnson, Margaret Burmeister. 

Topeka Branch — Lillian Greer. 

Retirement Relation Granted: 

Cincinnati Branch — Elizabeth Hoge. 

Northwestern Branch — Mabel Eddy, retires January 1, 1936, $296.40 
allowance per year (special additional grant of $150 for one year). Mildred 
Foster (without allpwance). Eulalia Fox, retires January 1, 1936, $250 per 
year. Ruth Wilson, retires July 1, 1936, salary paid by Northwestern Branch 
until that date. 

Des Moines Branch — Lydia Trimble, retires October 1, 1935, allowed 
$600, less five per cent. Elizabeth Turner (without allowance). 

Special Cases: 

New York Branch — Dr. A. Evelyn Leadbeater, transferred to China 
from Korea. 

Cincinnati Branch — Miss Laura Schleman, accepted as regular missionary 
instead of contract teacher. 

Pacific Branch — Mary Louise Lane, detained, salary allowed one year. 
Irma Schlater, detained, salary allowed one year. 



Insurance Pension Policies 

Resolved: — ■(!) That Miss Florence Hooper, resident of Baltimore, Md., 
U. S. A., treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church be duly empowered by this resolution of the Foreign 
Department of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church to surrender the deferred annuity contracts or any of them, 
in the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, taken out by the said Society 
on the lives of the following employees of the said Society, for their cash sur- 
render value, to assign said contracts and generally to exercise all otherrights 
under said contracts and to execute and deliver in the name of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and for and in its behalf, all forms of receipt, 
assignment and other instruments of writing which may be required by said 
Assurance Company for the purposes aforesaid : — Mildred Foster, Margaret 
R. GoNGWER, Florence E. Kleinhenn, Beta Scheirich, Helen Gladys 
Moore, Mary A. Johnson. 

Resolved: — (2) That Miss Florence Hooper, resident of Baltimore, Md., 
U. S. A., treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church be duly empowered by this resolution of the Foreign De- 
partment of the W'oman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, to surrender the deferred annuity contracts or any of them in the 
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company of Springfield, Mass., taken 
out by the said Society for their cash surrender value, to assign such contracts 
and generally to exercise all other rights under said contracts and to deliver 
^nd execute in the name of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and for 



Foreign Department 115 

and in its behalf all forms of receipt, assignment and other instruments of 
writing which may be required by said Insurance Company for the purposes 
aforesaid: — Hannah Isabel Latimer, Thelma A. Rebstock, Anna Mabel 
Taylor, Edna Van Fleet. 

Resolved:— [3) That Miss Florence Hooper, resident of Baltimore, Md., 
U.S. A., treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, be duly empowered by this resolution of the Foreign Depart- 
ment of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church to surrender the Retirement Life Income contracts or any of them 
in the Provident Mutual Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia, Pa., taken 
out by the said Society, for their cash surrender value, assign said contracts 
and generally to exercise all other rights under said contracts and to execute 
and deliver in the name of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and for 
and in its behalf, all forms of receipt, assignment and other instruments of 
writing which may be required by the said insurance company for the purposes 
aforesaid: — Olive E. Kennard. 



Relating to Appropriations, 1936 

Resolved: — That 1936 appropriations be authorized as follows to be made 
from funds in the hands of the general treasurer. 

a. Zenana Papers $1,100 from income of the Zenana Paper Fund. 

b. Income of the Francesca N. Gamble Fund, Sadie B. Ferguson Fund 
and other funds for medical education, for medical scholarships to be paid 
candidates for medical missionary service under the Society, as voted by the 
Foreign Department. 

c. Income of the Isabella Thoburn College Endowment for scholarships 
and professorships. 

d. $46,000 retirement allowances. 

e. Foreign Administration Budget for 1936. 

Taxes — as required 

Interest and Exchange $3,250 

Fukien Bureau of Building Construction 350 

Committee on Co-operation in Latin America 700 

Committee on Co-operation in Philippines 715 

Joint Committee on Religious Education in Foreign Fields 500 

Executive Board of M. E. Church in Southern Asia 250 

China Christian Council 90 

Foreign Treasurers' Expenses 2,500 

Title Expenses and Powers of Attorney 500 

Miscellaneous 1,000 

Resolved: — a. That retirement allowances in 1936 be, as they were in 1935, 
cut 5 per cent (1932 allowances being 100 per cent). 

b. That field and home salaries of missionaries in active service be in 1936 
as they were in 1935, 85 per cent of such salaries in 1932. 

c. That current work appropriations be in 1936 as they were in 1935, 
70 per cent of such appropriations in 1932. The above resolutions, a, b, c, 
indicate that there will be no increase in the cut for 1936. 

Resolved: — That 500 copies of an appropriations booklet be printed, the 
cost to be paid by the general treasurer, and that the booklet contain a full 
list of missionaries' salaries and travel, a summary of conference totals by 
Branches and the usual miscellaneous general items. 



116 Reports 

A study of Branch obligations to the Field on our present basis as com- 
pared with actual appropriations authorized by Branches for 1936 shows an 
excess of obligations over authorized Branch appropriations of approximately 
$150,000. 

The foreign field treasurers and the treasurer at home report to us as 
available to help meet this excess for 1936 amounts from unused building 
balances and similar undesignated sources from closing work have accumulated 
approximately as follows: 

China (on the field Mex 31,000) $12,000 

Burma (on the field) 5,000 

Malaya (10 per cent reduction in appropriations) 1,500 

South America: (Building balances) $5,700 

Current work reduction 6,300 12,000 



India (Raipur, Basim and Sironcha current work re- 
ductions) 5,556 

Balance from 1935 Assistance to Branches Fund 40,000 

Fire Insurance F"und 31,938, 

Mexico (Closing of schools) 10,000 

Korea (Wonju) 270 

Japan (Sendai property balances Yen 13,500) 4,050 

Miscellaneous reductions to be later decided on by 

Foreign Department in detail 27,686 



$150,000 



Resolved:- — That the general treasurer be directed to pay quarterly from 
the funds above listed to each of the Branches wherein there is the above 
mentioned excess of field obligations over authorized Branch appropriations, 
one-fourth of such excess if needed by the Branch to meet its appropriations. 

Voted, On motion of the treasurer that $31,938 now in the Fire Insurance 
Fund be transferred by the treasurer to the account on her books known as 
"Assistance to Branches 1936." 

Voted, On motion of Mrs. Hardie.that 1936 appropriations be printed in 
Branch reports giving conference totals only for current work, names and 
passage of missionaries on the present reduced basis, following the form of 
Appropriations Book as published by the general treasurer, and that explana- 
tory statement precede these printed appropriations where necessary. 

Voted, Upon motion of Mrs. Moore, that items known as "Tulsa 13" (see 
Tulsa Minutes) be put into appropriations. 

Above action later rescinded and following action 

Voted, That the general treasurer be authorized to pay from the "Assistance 
to Branches Fund" the "Tulsa 13" list as revised. 

Items placed in revised list to be put in Branch appropriations for 1937. 

Voted, That the general treasurer and the official correspondent make such 
adjustments in Sumatra exchange as shall seem wise and notify Branches. 

Voted, That in 1936 there be no appropriation to Clotilda Lyon McDowell 
Fellowship Fund. 

Voted, That in case of an emergency need at Rosario arising if that school 
cannot close, the general treasurer be authorized to advance necessary monies 
for running expenses until such time as school can be legally closed, this 
advance to be refunded from sale of property. 

Voted, That general treasurer be authorized to pay indemnities due to 
closing of Mexico schools from general treasury, this amount to come from 
sale of properties. 

Voted, That general treasurer be authorized to pay necessary indemnities 



Foreign Department 117 

for the Rosario teachers from the general treasury, this amount to be refunded 
from the sale of property. 

Voted, That because of the increased cost of living resulting from the depre- 
ciation of currency in Argentina and Uruguay, a special appropriation be made 
from gain by exchange to supplement the salary of each of our missionaries 
and contract teachers in Eastern South America in proportion to the amount 
of her salary not being paid in the United States, of 210 pesos per quarter in 
Argentina and 240 pesos per quarter in Uruguay. 

Voted, To approve the following readjustments in appropriations for 
Mexico and North Africa: 

Deducted from Mexico: To be added to North Africa: 

New England $1,000 New England $1,000 

New York 800 New York 800 

Philadelphia 3,800 Baltimore 100 

Cincinnati 1,000 Northwestern . . . 1,260 

Baltimore 100 Pacific 300 

Northwestern . . . 2,000 

Des Moines 500 $3,460 

Topeka 500 

Pacific 300 



$10,000 



Resolved, That the treasurer in consultation with the corresponding secre- 
taries of Northwestern and Cincinnati Branches be authorized to adjust the 
special work appropriations which are in question because certain German 
auxiliaries have been transferred from Cincinnati to Northwestern Branches 
and to provide ij necessary from "assistance to Branches fund" the cash neces- 
sary to prevent these items lapsing on the field. 



Report of Comtnittee on Nominations 

Foreign Department Member of Committee on Nominations for 
THE Society — Mrs. Otis Moore. 

Joint Committee on Religious Education — Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. 
Dorr Diefendorf. 

Methodist Joint Committee on Korea, Mexico and Japan — Mrs. 
Thomas Nicholson, Miss Florence Hooper, Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell, Miss Juliet 
Knox. 

Committee on Christian Higher Education in India — -Mrs. Dorr 
Diefendorf, Mrs. Franklin Reed, Miss Ruth Ransom. 

Committee on Christian Literature for Women and Children in 
Mission Lands — Miss Clementina Butler. 

Associated Boards for Christian Colleges in China — Representa- 
tives on Board of Ginling College, West China Union University, Shantung 
Christian University, Yenching College. 

Union College Committees — Ginling College: — Miss Elizabeth Bender, 
Mrs. F. J. McConnell. Alternate, Mrs. Albert Beebe. 

Isabella Thoburn College: — Miss Ella Watson, Mrs. Wm. Boyd, Mrs. C. H. 
Hardie, Mrs. H. E. Woolever, Dr. Geo. Briggs, Mrs. Thomas Donohugh, Miss 
Florence Hooper. Alternate, Mrs. Fred Victor. Advisory members, Mrs. Ellis 
Phillips, Mrs. Wm. Boyd. 

West China Union University: — Mrs. Frank Baker. Alternate, Mrs. W. E. 
Scarrit. 



118 Reports 

Woman's Christian College of Japan: — Miss Florence Hooper, Mrs. Wm. E. 
Mitchell, Miss Margaret Forsythe. Alternate, Mrs. Fred Foster. 

Eivha College:— Mrs. J. M. Avann, Mrs. F. J. McConnell, Miss Florence 
Hooper. Alternate, Mrs. Wm. S. Mitchell. 

Women's Christian College of Madras: — -Miss Clementina Butler, Mrs. 
Walter A. Jessup. Alternate, Mrs. B. H. McCoy. 

Shantung Christian Utiiversity: — Mrs. J. K. Cecil, Mrs. Franklin Reed. 
Alternate, Mrs. Eric North. 

Vellore Medical College: — -Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Miss Clementina Butler. 
Alternate, Mrs. B. F. McCoy. 

Yenching College for Women: — -Mrs. J. K. Cecil, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf. 
Alternate, Miss Ruth Ransom. Board of Trustees, Mrs. J. M. Avann. 

Foochow Christian Union Hospital: — Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. J.M. M. 
Gray, Mrs. Frank Baker. Alternate, Mrs. Frank Home. Board of Trustees, 
Dr. Lillian Quimby. 

Permanent Committee of Mission Bo.\rd§ Working in the Philippine 
Islands: — Mrs. C. C. Peale, Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf, Mrs. Frank Baker. 
Alternate, Mrs. Victor. 

Committee on Co-operation in Latin America: — Miss Elizabeth Lee, 
Miss Juliet Knox, Mrs. F. J. McConnell. Alternate, Miss Ruth Ransom. 

Rural Missions Co-operating Committee: — Mrs. Reed. Alternate 
Mrs. Victor. 

Special Committees 

Committee on the Revision of the Budget for the Field: — -Mrs. 
Moore, Mrs. Diefendorf, Miss Hooper, Mrs. McConnell, Mrs. Gray, Mrs. Peel, 
Miss Watson, Miss Knox. 

Committee on Rules: — Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Peel, Mrs. Reed. 

Mrs. Franklin Reed, Secretary Foreign Department. 



Report of Committee on the Revision of the Budget 

The committee on the revision of the budget for the foreign field, brought 
with its unanimous recommendation, the following Resolution which had come 
from one of its sub-committees, the medical committee. After thorough con- 
sideration by the Department, it was 

Voted, That a copy of the Resolution be sent to the Board of Foreign 
Missions, addressed to Dr. Edwards and Dr. DifTendorfer, with a covering 
letter explaining our action. Both Resolution and letter were sent to the policy 
committee of the Board, now meeting. 

Resolution 

Voted, That in view of opportunities for developing new and greatly 
needed types of medical work in China, and in view also of present budget 
realities, the policy of the Society with reference to its hospitals in China, be 
changed as follows: — 

I. Those stations where both the Board of Foreign Missions and the 
Society have hospitals, the Society to close its hospital, leaving the field to the 
Board, and the Society to offer to co-operate with the Board through the 
training of nurses and through the continued support of certain of the American 
or Chinese women doctors or nurses who can be taken over by the Board 
hospital, and also through lending the use of the Society's present hospital 
property and equipment to the Board hospitals if needed for medical purposes. 



Foreign Department 119 

2. In each station (except Sien^'u and Futsing) where the Society has a 
hospital and the Board has none, to close the Society's hospital. 

3. In the case of Sienyu, to discover, through conference with represen- 
tatives of the Board of Foreign Missions, of the American Board and of the 
Church Missionary Society, whether the hospital is regarded as essential to a 
general medical program for North Fukien, and if so, to offer the use of the 
hospital and its equipment as the Society's share in such a general medical 
program. Futsing hospital would be continued as at present. 

4. To enter upon a program of advance in health education and in pre- 
ventive medicine according to plans now in the making, this program to be 
put into effect in areas where there is great present need and welcome for such 
work, and utilizing for this end certain of the doctors and nurses now on the 
staff of hospitals that may be designated for closing. 

5. To co-operate in the training of nurses in union hospitals. 

6. To utilize, in part at least, for underwriting this new program funds 
that may be realized through the sale of certain hospital properties to be 
released by this program of readjustment, and in part also through current 
work appropriations so released. 

This inclusive program of advance and of adjustment shall go into effect 
by October 1, 1936. 



Covering Letter 

Dr. John R. Edwards, St. Louis, Mo., October 19, 1935. 

Dr. R.\lph E. Diffendorfer, 
150 Fifth Ave., New^ York, N. Y. 

Dear Dr. Eduards and Dr. Diffendorfer: 

Herewith we are sending j'ou a copy of the action voted by the Foreign 
Department of our General Executive Committee and pertaining to a changed 
policj' for our medical work in China. You will understand, of course, that we 
are not proposing to cease medical work, which is a phase of mission endeavor 
having a large place in the minds and hearts of the women of our constituency, 
but to change the aspects of this work on which we shall hereafter place 
emphasis. Social service, rural reconstruction and health programs will all 
involve a medical ministry. Definite plans for these developments are being 
formulated and a program to this end will be ready by next autumn. 

Moreover, we are assured by Dr. Hume that the need for American women 
doctors is decreasing as Chinese women are becoming accustomed to the 
services of men physicians. This change of attitude synchronizes with a 
difficult}- on our part in enlisting American women medical candidates for 
service in China and with our need to make significant readjustments in our 
financial commitments. We have every purpose to pla^' fair with our present 
medical and nursing personnel in China and, of course, we wish to use their 
skill and experience where these will best serve China's needs and the general 
mission program. Further, as already indicated, we propose in due course to 
reach out into new types of medical ministry-. 

Our approach to the Board of Foreign Missions with reference to certain 
persons and properties releasable by the carrying out of the policy indicated, 
will be an evidence of our desire to co-operate just as far as practicable with the 
Board and also in enterprises involving wider union. The long time con- 
tinuance of such co-operation through the provision by us of staff personnel 
and of their support in the Board or in union hospitals must depend, of course, 
on whether the administrative officers and the supporting constituency of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society become convinced that such co-operation 



120 Reports 

represents the most effective use of our resources, and also on whether this 
co-operation as it works out, proves to be true co-operation on both sides or to 
be only the support of secondary and auxiliary activities on our part. 

It is recognized by us, of course, that details growing out of this policy 
proposal will call for patient negotiation between the Society and the Board in 
the early stages of the adjustment involved. 

We shall be in session at the Kingsway Hotel, St. Louis, for two days after 
your committee on policy and program shall have finished its work. Whether 
this policy proposal set forth in the enclosed resolution, in so far as it pertains to 
the work and institutions of the Board, be or be not acceptable to your com- 
mittee on policy and program we shall be grateful for a telegraphed night letter 
sent on Tuesday or Wednesday night which will enable our Foreign Depart- 
ment to confirm or to reconsider this policy resolution, and then to secure final 
action by our General Executive Committee before the adjournment of this 
annual meeting of the Committee. 

We trust that your committee on policy and program may be guided to the 
soundest conclusions not only on the matter of medical policy but also on all 
other issues which are to come before your committee. 

Sincerely yours. 



The following reply was received from Dr. DifTendorfer on October 23, 
1935:— 

Mrs. DoR|R Diefendorf: 

Your proposals concerning medical work in China were recommended by 
our policy committee to Board for approval in principle. In case Board approves 
committee recommends adjustments be referred to joint committee on con- 
sultation and that our executive committee be given power to take final action 
on details. Do you agree to this procedure? 

R. E. DiFFENDORFER. 

After further consideration, it was unanimously voted to send second 
letter to the policy committee of the Board, stating in clearer terms and in more 
detail what it was felt should be the Society's position in the matter. 

Another letter was also voted sent to the policy committee of the Board. 
This was in regard to our work in Malaya and Sumatra, and came to the Depart- 
ment with the unanimous approval of the multi-country committee, in reply 
to the following paragraph from the minutes of the committee on consultation 
held in Columbus, September, 1935. 

In reply to a letter from Dr. Diflfendorfer calling for action and reply by 
wire on the following paragraph from the minutes of the committee of consul- 
tation held in Columbus, September, 1935: 

"That we favor an experiment in a unified administrative approach to 

Conferences and recommend to the Society and the Board that 

the field finance committees and the field reference committees in these 
conferences be reconstituted on a basis of equal members and then merged 
into a field committee of the Board and the Society. This committee under 
the leadership of the Bishop shall undertake the following: 

a. Study the needs of the field as a whole keeping in mind the work of 
other Churches in the same territory. 

b. Review the existing program of both the Society and the Board with 



Foreign Department 121 

the thought of work that might be strengthened, work that might be 
eliminated, possible new work. 

c. Make a unified program out of these studies. 

d. Indicate the responsibility of the Society and the Board in the total 
program. 

e. Send total program and estimates to both the Society and the Board 
for approval. 

f. When acted upon by the Society and the Board, the program will then 
be referred to this joint committee on the field for administration. 

That if and when the above program is approved by the Society and the 
Board it be carried out in Malaya and Sumatra." 

The following telegram was sent to the committee on policy of the Board 
of Foreign Missions, October 22, 1935, from the Foreign Department: 

"Voted that we favor an experiment in a unified administrative 
approach to the Malaya and Sumatra Conferences and request that the 
field finance committees and the field reference committees in these con- 
ferences be reconstituted on a basis of equal members and then merged 
into a field committee of the Board and the Society. This merging shall 
not involve the merging of the field treasuries of the Board and the Society. 
The committees under the leadership of the Bishop shall undertake the 
following: 

a. Study the needs of the field as a whole keeping in mind the work of 
other Churches in the same territory. 

b. Review the existing program of both the Society and the Board with 
the thought of work that might be strengthened, work that might be 
eliminated, possible new work. 

c. Make a unified program out of these studies. 

d. Indicate the specific and detailed responsibility of the Society and 
that of the Board in the total program as the joint committee visions 
such responsibility. 

e. Send total program and detailed estimates to both the Society and 
the Board for consideration and then the acceptance by each of such 
share as it may be able to assume. 

f. When acted upon by the Society and the Board the program and the 
detailed estimates as accepted shall then be referred to this joint 
committee on the field for administration. 

The above plan was approved with the idea that the plan shall come 
up for thorough reconsideration in 1939." 

Signed, 

Mrs. Thos. Nicholson, 
Mrs. Dorr Diefendorf. 

The following telegram was received by Mrs. Thomas Nicholson from Dr. 

Diflfendorfer : 

"Policy comittee will recommend to Board next month approval 
unified administration proposal as follows: We accept your addition to 
first paragraph and add 'Unless at some time and place such united treas- 
uries become mutually advantageous and are approved by the Society 
and the Board.' We accept your (d) and propose change in (e) to read 
'lor joint consideration and then the acceptance, etc' We accept your (f) 
and your proposals for 1939. Did you formally approve trying this in 
Malaya and Sumatra? Can you consider above changes and wire Wednes- 
day rnorning so we can convey united resolution to Board and your 
committees?" 

Received St. Louis, October 23, a.m. 



122 Reports 



After the two matters had been presented to the General Executive 

Committee and been given careful consideration, it was 

Voted, That the following telegram be sent to Dr. Diffendorfer: 

"General Executive Committee unanimously votes: Your committee's 
proposal in regard united treasuries seems unnecessary at this time in view 
thorough reconsideration in 1939. Your proposal change in (e) is accepted. 
Our Society approves trying plan in Malaya and Sumatra. Also in reply 
your telegram China medical policy. Your proposal adjustments be 
referred to joint committee on consultation accepted. Society votes so 
far as Society is concerned final action on details be referred to our Foreign 
Department to be polled by mail if necessary." 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson. 

Sent October 23, 1935. 

Reply Received October 23, 1935. 

"Policy committee felt that our phrase concerning united treasury 
should remain in our resolution thereby hoping it can have further dis- 
cussion in consultation committee. All other matters O.K. We have had 
two great days. We send our greetings and good wishes." 

R. E. Diffendorfer, 



Treasurer's Report 123 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

Report of Florence Hooper, Treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 

Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church 

Baltimore, Maryland 

GENERAL FUND— EXHIBIT A 

Statement of Receipts for Home Administration, Foreign Administration and 

Disbursements on Home and Foreign Administration Accounts 

for the year ended October 3, 1935. 

Home Administration Receipts 

New England Branch 

New York Branch 

Philadelphia Branch 

Baltimore Branch 

Minneapolis Branch 

Columbia River Branch 

Wesleyan Service Guild subscriptions for International Journal 
Religious Education 

Deficit October 3, 1935 



82,000.00 
5,115.00 
7,000.00 

940.00 
1,150.00 

500.00 


$16,705.00 






146.00 




$16,851.00 
39,347.54 


SS6. 198.54 


SI 46. 00 

7,747.88 


$19,967.51 


2,202.85 




6.682.98 




560.00 (1933-34) 
6,5C0.C0 (1934-35) 
1,072.12 



Home Administration Disbursements 

Deficit, October 3, 1934 

Subscriptions to InternationolJoutnal Religious Education 

Travel expenses to General Executive Meeting, October, 1934 .... 

Travel expenses to mid-year meeting of Home and Foreign Depart- 
ments and general officers. May, 1935 

Expenses general officers (clerical help, postage, stationery, office 
expenses, etc.) 

E^xpenses general office, Kew York City, (rent, salaries of secretary 
and assistants, office expenses twelve months) 

Studerit work 

Uoire Departirent: 

Junior woik S175.C0 

Young people's work 500.00 

Secretary's expenses 5.29 

Minutes 24.00 

Wesleyan Service Guild 1,000.00 

Extension department 12.47 

Miscellaneous 21.85 

Foreign Department: 

Cables, minutes, secretary's expenses S183.09 

Printing and distribution of 1935 appropriations 134.19 

■ 317.28 

Transportation Bureau of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church 100.00 

Budget— Dr. Charles H. Fahs 1,250.00 

Jnterdencminational and Inter-Board Meetings: 

Tra\el to Ccrrmitteeon Consultation and Foreign 

Missions Conference 745.64 

Forei,en Missicns Conference acd Federation of 

Wcrcen's Beards. 1935 arpropriation 3,1C0.C0 

Travel to union college and hospital meetings... 804.80 

Travel to Inter-Board meetings, etc 388.13 

Travel to country committees 262.98 

Indian College Campaign 3C0.CO 



1,738.61 



124 



Reports 



Miscellaneous: 

Share Plan letters 

Safe deposit box 

World Citizenship 

Auditing accounts of treasurer and preparing 

Federal Income Tax Reports 

Fidelity bond of treasurer 

Certified copies of wills and legal expenses re 

bequests, powers of attorney 

Printing Year Book and Executive Daily 

Advertising and registration of securities 

President's grant 

Miscellaneous 



$150.00 
308.00 
150.00 






250.00 
62.50 






516.68 

594.31 

50.00 

58.46 

171.81 


$2,311.76 






$36,231.03- 










$56,198.54- 



Due and Unpaid Account 1935 Home Administration 

Philadelphia Branch $2,000.00 

Pacific Branch 4,000.00 

$6,000.00 

Which reduces deficit to $33,347.54 



Foreign Administration Receipts 

New England Branch $1,500.00 

New York Branch 4,000.00 

Philadelphia (1934) 2,500.00 

Baltimore Branch 2,025.00 

Minneapolis Branch 300.00 

Pacific Branch (For India National Christian Council) 175.00 

Deficit, October 3, 1935 



$10,500.00' 
21,297.94 



$31,797.94 



Foreign Administration Disbursements 

Deficit. October 3, 1934 

Taxes on buildings on the foreign field 

Interest and exchange 

Fukien Bureau of Building Construction 

Committee on Christian Colleges in India 

Committee on Co-operation in Latin America 

Committee on Co-operation in Philippine Islands 

Joint Committee on Religious Education in Foreign Fields 

Executive Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church — India 

Administrative cost Korean Methodist Church 

Property and title e.Kpenses 

International Councils: 

India $565.53 

Africa (Sr. Moeira) 100.00 

China 88.01 



Dr. Hume's visit to hospitals in Far East . 
Expenses of foreign treasurers 



$6,878.54 

12,674.69 

4,180.46 

350.00 

250.00 

700.00 

65.00 

500.00 

414.52 

532.51 

1,436.49 



753.54 

75.00 

2,987.19 



$31,797.94 



Due and Unpaid Account 1935 

Philadelphia Branch $4,000.00 

Pacific Branch 1,175.00 

$5,175.00 
Which reduces deficit to $16,122.94 



Treasurer s Report 12S 



UNION COLLEGES— EXHIBIT B 

For the year ended October 3, 1935 
Receipts 

New England Branch S700.00 

New York Branch 190.40 

Philadelphia Branch (1934) 2,203.60 

Cincinnati Branch 2,199.60 

Des Moines Branch 4.90 

Topeka Branch 1,886.95 

Minneapolis Branch 35.00 

Pacific Branch 602.70 



S7 823 15' 
Deficit, October 3, 1935 7,481.45 



$15,304.60 



Disbursements 

Deficit, October 3, 1934 85,011.15 

West China University §700.00 

Madras College 850.00 

St. Christophers College 425.00 

Vellore Medical School 475.00 

Ginhng College 1.750.00 

Woman's Christian College of Japan 4,693.45 

Yenching College 1,400.00 



Due and Unpaid Account 1935 

New York Branch S31S.00 

Philadelphia Branch 2,203.60 

Northwestern Branch 2,685.90 

Pacific Branch 602.70 



S5,807.20 



Disbursements 

Literature and supplies for Units $34.26 

Partial support of teacher (Faith Laio) 60.00 

Special for Korea Unit 5.00 

Secretary of German Work 350.00 

Scandinavia (work and literature) 200.00 



10,293.45 



$15,304.60 



Reducing deficit to $1,674.25 



INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT— EXHIBIT C 

For the year ended October 3, 1935 
Balance, October 4, 1934 S902.97' 

Receipts 

Gifts through Miss Achard $178.00 

Gifts through Mrs. Nicholson 10.00 

Gift of Bulgaria members 11 .36 

Baltimore Branch 45.00 

New York Branch 100.00 



$1,247.35 



649.26 



Balance, October 2, 1935 $598.07 

Note: — Received after books closed, N. W. Branch — $100.00 



126 Reports 

ZENANA PAPER FUND INCOME— EXHIBIT D 

For the year ended October 3, 1935 
Balance, October 3, 1934 $2,107.84 

Receipts 

Net income from securities held by Florence Hooper, treasurer 999.22 

$3,107.06 
Disbursements 

Drafts from India for Zenana Papers (Rs. 5250) 1,905.40 

Balance October 3, 1935 $1,201.66 

RETIREMENT FUND PRINCIPAL AND INCOME— EXHIBIT E 

For the year ended October 3, 1935 
Balance, (cash and securities) October 3, 1934 $944,065.83 

RETIREMENT FUND PRINCIPAL 
Receipts 

Gift of Miss Betty Baker $25.00 

Legacy of Mary Louise Miller 2,775.70 

Gift of Miss Violet McCullis 4.00 

Legacy of Alice Means 4,572.62 

— 7,377.32 

W5 1.443. 15 
Disbursements — 

Purchase of Pension Policies for missionaries actually retired: — 

Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada $174,302.70 

Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co 145,824.31 

Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U. S 129,409.43 

Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Philadelphia 4,545.00 

■ 454,081.44 

Balance, (cash and securities) October 31, 1935 $497,361.71 

RETIREMENT FUND INCOME 
Receipts 

Income from investments $41,711.64 

Deficit, October 3, 1935 34,076.14 

$75,787.78 

Disbursements 

Allowances paid to retired missionaries $46,029.15 

Deficit, October 3, 1934 29,758.63 

• — $75,787.78 



Note:— Due from Pension Policies October 15, 1935 $19,578.27 

Which will reduce income deficit to $14,497.87 

PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF LAND, BUILDINGS AND 
NON-RECURRING ITEMS— EXHIBIT F 

Statement of Payments on Account of Land, Buildings, and Non-Recurring Items received by 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society for the year ended 
October 3, 1935 
CHINA 
Hwa Nan College 

Endowment— (Interest to July 1, 1935) $901.25 

Special gift Mrs. H. B. Earhart 2,000.00 

Young People's Thank-Offering, 1935 

(Foochow Union Christian Hospital) 

New England $500.00 

New York 1 ,058.04 

Baltimore 1,000.00 

Des Moines 1,400.00 

Minneapolis 400.00 

Topeka 1 ,500.00 

Columbia River 100.00 

5,958.04 



Treasurer s Report 



127 



Interest on China Invested Funds to July 1, 1935 

Gertie Brethorst Memorial Kindergarten 

Jessie B. Joyre Legacy 

Legacy Lucy Hoag 

Bashford gift for Peking Training School for Preachers' Wives. 

INDIA 
Bengal 

Darjeeling school buildings New York — Auxiliarj^ T. O 

Indus River 

Tilaunid Sanitarium 

Contribution from Golden Rule Foundation 

Northwest India 

Brindaban Hospital 

Interest to February 1, 1934 

JAPAN 

Junior Thank-OflFering, 1934-1935 

New England 

New York 

Baltimore 

Des Moines 

Minneapolis 

Topeka 

Columbia River 

KOREA 

Woman's Christian College of Korea 

Special Gifts 

Junior Thank-Offering 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 

Interest on balances to March 1 , 1935 

East Gate Hospital — Freeman gift 

Interest to July 1, 1935 



S48.47 

28.50 

5.65 

128.64 



§400.00 
388.57 
500.00 
500.00 
200.00 

1,000.00 
50.00 



S7S0.00 
660.25 



$211.26 



7,972.31 



25.00 



1,567.81 



3,038.57 



7 1,000.00' 



1,410.25 
837.37 



80.97 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Mary J. JTohnston Hospital. Manila 

Received from Emma Gale Harris Estate for repairs, etc. 



3,370.50' 



EUROPE AND NORTH AFRICA 
France 

Le Foyer Retrouve 

Account of sale of small strip of land 

Received through Miss Whiteley 

12 months rent 

Bulgaria 

American Girls School, Lovetch 

Account sale of Sophia property 

Praise Offering— 19J6 

New York 

Young People's Thank-Offering 1934 — Indegenous teachers and 
motors 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 



S658.00 

1,452.00 

6.45 


2,116.45 
3,400.00 






30.40 


$4,000.00 
2,182.74 


6,182.74 






$110,102.92 



128 Reports 



PENSION PURCHASES— EXHIBIT G 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements, to and including 
October 3, 1935 
Net Receipts to October 3, 1935 (after expenses) $350,546.14 

Receipts 

Through Miss Achard from Swiss members re Lydia Urech's 

pension 891.48 

Gift of Miss LeHuray 5.00 

New England $1,500.00 

New York 7,120.10 

Philadelphia 14,081.77 

Baltimore 1,785.00 

Cincinnati 2,751.41 

Des Moines 750.00 

Minneapolis 400.00 

Topeka 2,000.00 

Columbia River 400.00 

30,788.28 



$382,230.90 
Deficit, October 3, 1935 *60,483.72 



$442,714.62 

Disbursements 

Premiums paid 1927 to October 3, 1935 $497,834.61 

Less: Refunds, cash surrender values 

1927 to October 1, 1932 $11,748.04 

October 1, 1932 to October 5, 1933 9,706.82 

October 5, 1933 to October 3, 1934 21,289.72 

October 3, 1934 to October 3, 1935 12,375.41 



55,119.99 

$442,714.62 



'To be reduced by payments due and paid after October 3, 1935, to $46,474.44. 



Auditor s Certificate 129 



AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE 

Baltimore, Maryland, 

October Fifteenth, 

Nineteen Hundred Thirty-five 

Miss Florence Hooper, Treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Dear Madam: 

We have audited your accounts, as Treasurer of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for the year ended 
October 3, 1935, and submit, herewith, the following exhibits: 

Exhibit A — Statement of Receipts for Home Administration, Foreign 
Administration, and Disbursements on Home and Foreign 
Administration Accounts, for the year ended October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit B — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements Union Colleges 
for the year ended October 3 1935. 

Exhibit C — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements International 
Department for the year ended October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit D — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements Zenana Paper 
Fund for the year ended October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit E — Statement of Retirement Fund Principal and Income for the 
year ended October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit F — Statement of Payments on Account of Land, Buildings and 
Non-Recurring Items Received by the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society for the year ended October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit G — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements — Pension Pur- 
chases, to and including October 3, 1935. 

Exhibit H — Securities as at October 3, 1935.* 

We hereby certify that, in our opinion, the accompanying Exhibits are 
correct as of October 3, 1935. 

Respectfully, 

BLACK AND COMPANY, 

Certified Public Accountants, 

By WiLMER Black, C.P.A. 

*List of securities not printed in Year Book. 



130 



Reports 



PUBLICATION OFFICE 

Annie G. Bailey, Publisher, in Account with the 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, of the 

Metliodist Episcopal Church 

RECEIPTS 

October 1, 1934 to October 1, 1935 

Subscriptions to Woman's Missionary Friend $34,035.67 

Subscriptions to Junior Missionary Friend 4,784.66 

Subscriptions to Frauen Missions Freund 430.14 

Literature $13,552.96 

K. H. Supplies 2,392.60 

S. B. Supplies 1.554.91 

L. L. B. Supplies 392.03 

General Executive Report $ 1,098.00 

W. F. M. S. Badges 36.55 

Workers Training Course 397.92 

Credits on Accounts Paid .82 

For Collections on Checks 5.11 

Advertising 93.00 

Cuts and Electros 32.44 

From invested funds account 2,212.63 

General Officers letter heads 23.85 

Editor Woman's Missionary Friend for Postage 99.00 

Executive Daily 449.42 

Total Receipts 

Cash on Hand October 1, 1934 



$39,250.47 



17,892.50 



4,448.74 



$61,591.71 
9,421.23 



$71,012.94 



DISBURSEMENTS 

October 1, 1934 to October 1, 1935 
Woman's Missionary Friend 

Printing $14,833.88 

Mailing and Postage 4,916.85 

Illustrations 91.35 

Refund on Subscriptions 14.65 

Manuscripts 40.00 

Bound Volumes 8.25 

Rent 890.00 

Clerical Services* 3,778.70 

Editor's Salary* 1,590.00 

Editor's Budget* 898.04 

Editor's Postage 99.00 

Editor's Supplies 5.63 

Editing "Study "in Friend^ 202.56 

Subscription Cultivation 519.97 

Junior Missionary Friend 

Printing $3,329.42 

Mailing and Postage 445.66 

Illustrations 284.73 

Refunds on Subscriptions 10.90 

Subscription Blanks and Expiration cards 26.40 

Clerical Services* 598.00 

Rent 250.00 

Bound Volumes 3.75 

Editor's Salary* 540.00 

Editor's Postage and Supplies 15.00 

♦Less accepted reductions. 



$27,888.88 



5,503.86 



Publication Office 



131 



Frauen Missions Freund 

Printing $843.08 

Mailing and Postage 205.42 

Manuscript 5.00 

Clerical Services* 250.00 

Rent 180.00 

Editor's Salary* 428.40 

Editor's Postage 6.23 

Literature 

Printing Leaflets, Mite Boxes and Supplies $12,647.19 

Books 381.16 

Cuts and Seals 223.84 

Refunds 1.32 

Clerical Services* 2,395.00 

Rent 780.00 

Postage and Express 1,795.16 

Wrapping Paper and Twine 33.54 

Printing and Distributing General Executive Report 1,087.50 

Multigraph Supplies and Repairs 389.41 

Binding Reports 2.88 

■Workers Training Course (Preparing and Distributing) 561.12 



$1,918.13 



$20,298.12 



General Expense of ttie Publication Office 

Publisher's Salary* $2,070.00 

Stationery and Supplies 391 .49 

Telephone and Telegrams 138.87 

Auditor 25.00 

Insurance 101.14 

Light and Power 1 19.07 

Appropriation, Swedish Literature* 90.00 

Addressograph Supplies and Repairs 291.15 

Travelling Expense, Editors and Publisher to General Executive, 

and Mid- Year Meetings 671.31 

General Officers Letterheads 23.85 

Collection on Checks and Tax 21.23 

Returned to Reserve Fund 2,000.00 

Uncollectible Checks (1933 bank closings) 262.45 

Executive Daily 475.76 

Total Disbursements 

Cash on Hand, October 1, 1935 



6,681.32 



$62,290.31 
8,722.63 



$71,012.94 



Assets and Liabilities 

October 1, 1935 

Assets 

Deposit State Street Trust $5,000.00 

Cash on Hand, October 1, 1935 8,722.63 

Due October 1, 1935 on Unpaid Accounts 5,072.06 

Value of Stock (Estimated) 2,500.00 

Value of Equipment (Estimated) 2,300.00 

Total Assets $23,594.69 

Liabilities 

Due on Unexpired Subscriptions (Estimated) $15,000.00 

Royalty on "Hints from Squints" Gregg 500.00 

Total Liabilities 15,500.00 

Net Assets $8,094.69 

*Less accepted reductions. 

Certificate of audit filed with Mrs. H. E. Woolever, Secretary, after January 1, 1936. 



132 Reports 



BEQUESTS AND LAPSED LIFE INCOME GIFTS 

1934-1935 

New England Branch 

Mary L. Atwood New Haven, Conn $1,500.00 

Ellen S. Drew Burlington, Vt 200.00 

Lucius A. Merrill New Britain, Conn 1,012.43 

Grace M. Miller Brookline, Mass 3,822.71 

Susan J. Reed Concord, N. H 475.00 

Emma D. Reynolds Brockton, Mass 200.00 



New York Branch 

James S. Barnard (add'I) Rochester, N. Y $237.61 

Elizabeth T. Bekler Kinderhook, N. Y 100.00 

Caroline F. Ekert Poughkeepsie, N. Y 500.00 

Amy G. Lewis New York, N. Y 2,334.50 

Homer J. Mitchell Binghamton, N. Y 816.99 

Lucv E. Philo New York, N. Y 6,240.71 

Harriet L. A. Plough Hammondsport, N. Y 50.00 

*Mr . Jennie W. Cramer Cambridge, N. Y 212.67 

*M. Amelia Currie Montreal, Can 847.24 

*S. Eunice Tompkins Syracuse N. Y 1,744.83 

*Alice Webster Buffalo, N. Y 37.21 



Philadelphia Branch 

Samuel Charleston Pittsburgh, Pa $250.00 

Hannah M. Cotteral Reading, Pa 100.00 

Margaretta Curry Pittsburgh, Pa 2,517.50 

Mrs. S. M. Meyers Lancaster, Pa 100.00 

Flora Reel Philadelphia, Pa 50.00 

Mrs. L. C. Sands Pittsburgh, Pa 571.83 

Mary C. Trueman Philadelphia, Pa 550.00 

*Sarah A. Herr Harrisburg, Pa 500.00 



Baltimore Branch 

Miss Mary Numsen Baltimore, Md $500.00 



Cincinnati Branch 

Alice Means Northeast Ohio Conf $3,370.50 

Lela Lybarger Other sources 1,395.00 

Sarah Livingston Northeast Ohio Conf. ...... 25.00 

*Mrs. Esther Blattenberg Smithville, Ohio 300.00 

*Mrs. Chas. Paisley Wheeling, W. Va 200.00 



Northwestern Branch 

Alice A. Ames Wisconsin Conf $19.86 

Mrs. Hettie A. Hartman Wisconsin Conf 400.00 

Wm. K. Kerkhoff Rock River Conf 125.00 

Kissick Farm Illinois Conf 790.00 

Mrs. Robert Larrabe Illinois Conf 1,000.00 

J. N. Reed Estate Michigan Conf 206.58 

Mrs. Frances C. Staples Michigan Conf 282.88 

Lvdia Umpleby Illinois Conf 237.50 

*Mrs. Ruth Paxon N.W. Indiana Conf 1,000.00 

*Mrs. Angeline Bookout Illinois Conf 1 ,000.00 

*Mrs. W. H. Luke Illinois Conf 500.00 



7,210.14 



13,121.76 



4,639.33 



5,290.50 



5.561.82 



Bequests 133 

Des Moines Branch 

Frances Brotherlin LeClaire, la S250.00 

Addison P. Higgins Laclede, Mo 332. 6Q 

Martha J. Hill Minburn, la 1,800.00 

John W e^lev Jenkins Kansas City, Mo 500.00 

Martha Miller Davenport, la 208.88 

Tessie Phil'ips Maquoketa, la 2,020.49 

*belia B. Albrook Mt. \'ernon, la 500.00 



Topeka Branch 

Kate L. Coutant lola, Kans S2, 130.01 

Orissa K. Stephen Central City, Nebr 500.00 

George Irving Wright Lincoln, Xebr 200.00 

*Mrs. Rebecca A. Bavless Girard, Kans 19,268.64 

*Miss Rose Schaible Falls City. Nebr 198.23 



Pacific Branch 

Mrs. Nancv J. Boston Pasadena, Calif S510.00 

Mrs. Ada C. Jewell Pasadena, Calif 270.00 

Laura S. Barr Tucson, Ariz 50.00 

Homer J. Mitchell Long Beach, Calif 817.00 

*C. H. Bagley Los Angeles, Calif 2,118.00 

*Mrs. Josephine Dolman Pasadena, Calif 346.22 

*Mrs. Elizabeth Eraper Pasadena, Calif 4,952.85 

*Mrs. Anna M. Kiehl San Diego, Calif 499.50 

♦John Lennox Van Nuvs, Calif 6,559.63 

*Rev. John N. Marsh Glendale, Calif 523.00 

*Mrs. Emma B. Spohr Long Beach, Calif 351.13 



Columbia River Branch 

Sweet Estate $54.40 



Total Bequests 839,625.07 

Total Life Income Gifts 41,659.15 

♦Lapsed Life Income Gifts. 



85,612.06 



$22,296.88 



16,997.33 



134 Summary of Disbursements 

SUMMARY OF DISBURSEMENTS FOR 1934-1935 

For General 

Conferences Work 

Africa §36,355.38 

Burma 18,536.66 

China 276,228.90 

India 505,431.38 

Japan 68,444.23 

Korea 70,975.40 

Malaya 37 470.10 

Philippine Islands 30 604.67 

Sumatra Mission 7,837.20 

Bulgaria 6,049.23 

Central Europe 797.00 

Italy 5,123.80 

North Africa 18,766.34 

Eastern South America 20,779.50 

Mexico 37,376.67 

North Andes 8,770.60 

$149,547.06 

Miscellaneous Disbursements direct to the field 47,961.36 

Retirement Fund Endowment and Pension Purchases 28,002.83 

Retirement Allowances 46,029.15 

Student Aid and Aid to Missionaries on Furlough 3,444.55 

Administrative Expense, Education and Promotion 72,215.19 

Miscellaneous (not overhead) 22,902.30 

International Department 245.00 



$1,370,347.44 



Note: Miscellaneous Disbursements direct to the field include Literary Work, Library Service, 
Union College Current Expense, Assistance to Branches, Young People's Thank-Offering 
and Junior Thank-OfTering. 

This statement of disbursements is based on figures submitted by Branch treasurers. 
The general treasurer has merely compiled them. 



For Appropriations Summarized by Conferences 
see Appropriations Booklet for 1935 



For List of Real Estate see 1929 Year Book 



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t^o ^ ^ f^»0 



syiO atnooui ajiq paedEq 



S8 


888 


00 ro 


00 lO 


ooo 
ooo 




05 




OvlO 



SuiiajuO-IUE^X 



N^ c^ --^ *-* 1^ <».; fj t.^ 1-* 1,^ t-^ 

O -^^ ^^ »0 ^_ O ro 00 \C rf_ 0^_ 
Tj* on' O* lO f*^ nO oT lo" CS ■-^' rj*^ 

«^ ^ rj p<)cs -^ cs 






CS(^0'^*-<CNOCNeS'^r^00 



pusuj fidvuotssfj^ 
AOtufif o% siaqiJDsqns 









CN lo in '-^ o »W ^ cs 00 <s th 



CN CS so 



c3iqsi3quiap\[ l^^ox 



00O'^<M'«t(N\C00»i^00r^ 

ro ^ 00 o^ ^ ■•-( \o' irT MD t-^ O 

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suoi;bziub3jo I^^oX 



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,^?„--i^Ss 



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2a,P3u2;Q2f-'P-iU 



k 



140 



Statistics 



SUMMARY OF GENERAL STATISTICS OF FOREIGN CONFERENCES 
For the last complete conference year preceding October 1, 1935 



CONFERENCES 



Africa 

Angola 

Rhodesia 

Southeast Africa 

Total for Africa 

Burma 

China 

Central China 

Foochow 

Hinghwa 

Kiangsi (1933) 

North China 

Shantung 

West China 

Yenping 

Total for China 

India 

Bengal 

Bombay 

Central Provinces 

Gujarat 

Hyderabad 

Indus River 

Lucknow 

North India 

Northwest India 

South India 

Total for India 

Japan 

Korea 

Malaya 

Sumatra Mission 

Philippine Islands (1934). 

Europe and North Africa 

Bulgaria (1934) 

No. Africa 

Total for Europe & N.Africa 

Latin America 

Mexico 

North Andes 

Eastern So. America (1930) 

Total for Latin America . 

Others 

Grand Total 



Summary 



J3 


c 






3 




u 






aj 






:3 

fcL, 

c 


a] 


o 






m > 


c 


c 






M 




.- 


Sw 


V 




a 

c 


o^ 


fa 


s 


o 




^ 












§ 


r 


o 


u 
o 






146 
29 
27 
14 
4 
13 



31 

13 

411 



61 38 89 4665 



1153 



141 
80 
145 
235 
203 
104 
111 
361 
319 
222 



1921 

228 
1047 



o ,t^ 



39 



84 
109 



145 
400 
234 

53 
266 

34 
125 



169 
106 
171 
257 
234 
119 
142 
408 
355 
257 

2218 

313 

1084 

33 

17 

111 



129 
30 



30 



a! o 



Evangelistic Work 



Women in the Church 



30 
123 
138 
49 
41 
29 
20 
29 



34 

48 

73 

184 

166 

52 

7 

250 

154 

78 



2965 
2807 
1061 



6833 
613 



677 

7143 

4810 

1081 

2895 

940 

611 

842 

18999 



944 

1484 

948 

1956 

3132 

5960 

1678 

10744 

15125 

1064 



43035 
3951 
5699 
1294 
604 
8021 



281 
137 



2075 

263 

3177 



1247 
1713 
1350 



4310 
119 



231 

2419 

2929 

376 

1333 

439 

279 

241 



8247 



851 
650 

2355 

7323 
17055 
10941 

7218 
20000 
27222 

7949 



101564 

1898 

5085 

495 

104 

323 



1555 

200 

1205 



141 2195 94982 125203 7719 3722 





Foreign Statistics 

SUMMARY OF GENERAL STATISTICS OF FOREIGN CONFERENCES 
For the last complete conference year preceding October 1, 1935 


141 


Evangelistic Work 


Welfare Work 


Organizations on the Field 


Training Classes 


Social Work 


Orphanages, 

Hostels, 

Homes 

and Day 

Nurseries 


1) 

c 
<u 
U 

0) 

"> 

1 


c 

g 

1-1 

c 


c 
.0 

3 
d 




c 

E 

"o 

1- 

n 


1) 

3 
< 


Xi 

B 


— 



M 
C 
3 

>- 


g 
5 


11 

3 
•0 

e 

M.S? 




o 

•a 
W 

3 
O 

1 


3 

a 
B 

1 


S 

c 

II 


o 


B 
3 
Z 

H 


c 
B 

1 

c 


3 
U 


6 


B 

■3 
>-• 

a 
W 


V 

'■J 
c 
rt 
•0 
C 

0) 

< 
11 
bt 
a! 

> 

< 





<u 

B 
3 


c 
B 

)-• 
c 
W 


1 

s 

<u 


19 






32 


91 


1737 






































7 




220 


210 


1 


40 
























19 






19 


628 


























7 




220 


210 




























19 
21 

12 

17 
5 

43 
2 
S 

23 


19 
3 

18 
8 
9 


7 

8 
8 

1 


32 
1 

16 
18 

8 
17 

5 


110 

15 

57 
28 
157 
60 
65 
1428 


2365 
620 

1155 
2092 
5869 
2239 
1022 

863 
2046 

575 


1 


40 
































4 


i 


60 
20 


53 
15 














19 

7 

2 

23 

13 


517 
361 
225 
590 
357 


2 

1 
2 
1 


18 
198 
47 
20 


2 
1 
2 


47 














50 






4 


173 


1 


23 


149 










1 


20 




10 


1 


6 


7 


130 


301 


2 


170 


























9 










1 


45 










7 

1 

72 

11 
6 
9 

4 


216 
50 

2316 

230 
203 
243 

218 


2 


60 


1 


30 


30 




























10 


8 


210 


369 














8 
1 


343 
49 


6 

1 
1 




107 

35 
38 

"l4 

"so 


75 

6 

.... 


18 


73 


1795 


15861 

1444 

1003 

155 


2 


65 


6 


343 


1 


23 


276 
65 


■ 9 


1 


14 
5 

54 
1 










1 


17 










15 
































1 


5 


















5 
2 




. . . 
1 


156 
2922 
16 
2339 
1290 
1947 












151 






2 


161 






























































157 

74 
88 


14 

8 












4 


104 










8 
21 


196 
296 








































































































59 
33 
198 




3 
23 
10 




2 

1 
14 




456 
82 

' 148 


35 


9 


2 
13 


74 

95 

387 


11272 
14408 


6 
6 
1 


126 
468 
160 


1 
4 


151 
1807 






1386 
829 

2445 


210 
353 

889 


80 


5 






602 


18 


229 


39 


495 




















301 


6 




44 


6 


98 

2871 










































10 


139 






3 


83 


24 
10 


320 
284 


23 

8 
1 

9 


290 

130 
17 

147 






















14 
' 14 

' 11 
21 


5 

5 

22 

2 


2 

2 

32 
9 






618 


1 
1 


1 
1 

' '2 


419 
419 

60 
66 




3 


64 










2 
2 


25 















10 

76 
13 


284 

1189 
173 




618 

1694 
819 

478 


3 


64 










25 


' '4 
6 


54 

28 
27 












53 














3 


28 


3 


90 










8 


92 










2 


126 


53 










89 




3 


28 


3 




' 32 


24 


41 


10 


109 


2991 










8 


92 


1362 


90 
























23 


11 


975 


1234 














485 




79 




28 




ill80 


396 


116 


175 


2591 


51104 


29 


1062 


11 


2301 


12 


198 


8942 


2260 


984 















































142 



Statistics 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 




Pupils 
Day and Boarding 



AFRICA 

Boarding School Quessiia, 

Angola . . 


a 

ia 1 

ia 1 

ia 1 

5 


F 
M F 

F 

F 
M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

F 
F 

F 

F 
M F 
M F 


4 
4 
2 
4 
4 
18 

"i 

1 

2 

4 
2 


2 

13 

7 

6 

*6 

34 

5 

5 

19 

21 

11 

4 

7 

2 

74 

8 
4 

14 
16 

30 

1 
8 
6 


67 

221 

9C 

3C 

148 

556 


78 
129 
55 
44 
35 
341 

119 
119 
126 
206 
128 
92 
36 
25 

851 

100 
110 


83 








16 


244 
350 
145 
112 
183 
1034 

142 
165 
380 
425 
173 
125 
89 
46 

1545 

125 
110 

108 
576 

430 

20 

150 
120 


156 
110 
118 
128 
109 
621 

' '54 
42 

"62 
27 

185 


200 
150 
125 
90 
170 
735 

24 
37 
73 
240 
27 
8 
74 
27 

510 




Nellie Dingley School . . Mutambar 
So. Rhodes 










Girls Boarding School. Nyadiri 

So. Rhodes 














Fairfield Girls School. . .Old Umtal 


38 












Hartzell Girls School. . .Inhambam 
S. E. A. . . 












Total for Africa 


121 

23 
46 
64 
105 
28 
33 
24 
8 

331 

25 






— 


16 





BURMA 
Day Schools, District . .Pegu 


4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

. 13 

2 
2 

1 

4 

1 

1 

5 
1 










Indian District Schools Rangoon. 












Girls High School Rangoon. 

EnglishGirlsHighSchoolRangoon . 
Anglo-Chinese School. .Rangoon. 


86 
84 
17 


104 
30 




















29 
13 

229 










Neil Dexter Reid School. Thongwa . 










Total for Burma Conference . 

CHINA 
Central China Conference 


134 






^ 


















Olivet Memorial 




108 








94 
200 


66 
200 

250 

10 
4 
5 


7 








576 








? 


Methodist Girls 






430 








7 


Women's Half-Day 




20 
130 
99 














20 

21 












Second St. Day School Wuhu . . . 










? 














Total for Central China 


. 17 




6 


87 




459 


642 


538 




— 




1639 


294 


535 


?I 




1 







a 




c 




1) 




."2 


'5. 


D 




(i! 


0. 


"v 


c 






o 


*^ 


ffi 


^ 






■a 
c 


U 














c 


4J 


•o 


XI 




ii 


o 




Da 


'4. 



• 1 furnished by Board. 



Foreign Statistics 



143 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 





1 

JS 

1 

a 

3 


"S 

3 

o 

K 




j3 


Pupils 
Day and Boarding 


a 
•§ 

1 

K 

•§ 

to 

m 


a 

a 
-S 

•n 

.a 
u 


u 

01 

•a 

a 
Z 




Name and Location of Schools 




a 
5 


% 







15 


•a 

B 
o 

•z 


1 

6 


a 

3 

o 


1 


BY Conferences 


a 

1 




n 
•3 

1 

a 
Z 


FoocHOW Conference 
Hwa Nan High 


1 

2 
1 
1 

20 

1 

1 
5 
1 

7 

7 
1 

1 

16 

1 

11 

72 

1 
1 

1 
3 

1 

1 

2 


F 
F 

M F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

M F 

F 

M F 

M F 

F 

M F 

M F 

F 

F 

F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

F 

F 
F 


9 


9 
21 

4 

2 

24 

14 

6 

21 

8 

6 
8 
6 

9 
17 
6 

14 

175 

12 
11 

7 
6 

10 

6 

2 








102 
97 








102 

314 

146 

102 

380 

125 

55 

375 

57 

115 
120 
41 

188 

547 

47 

278 

2992 

97 
184 

120 
130 

62 

119 
45 


67 
68 

12 

31 
34 
SO 

2 


79 
210 

48 

12 
250 

20 

41 
100 

57 


* 


Tai Maiu Boarding 


146 
90 

35 


128 


89 








7 


Mary E. Crook 










Union Kindergarten 












12 




Day Schools, 


380 
70 










1 


Institutional Church 




20 
55 










Marguerite Stewart 








? 




75 


250 


SO 
25 








1 




32 








1 


Model Primary and 


30 


85 
120 








? 


Day Schools, District. Haitang. . . . 














Boarding School Kutien 

Model Primary and 




41 








38 

42 

5 

42 

391 

62 
38 

10 


38 

71 

200 

43 

60 

1229 

87 
98 

50 


1 


41 


108 
537 


39 
10 
19 

11 

243 








^ 












1 




28 








1 


Day Schools, City 


43 
460 


224 
1902 








? 


Total for Foochow. Conference. . 

Hinghwa Conference 
Hamilton Girls 


375 
47 


50 




12 


24 




65 

50 

25 


87 

70 
105 


32 




Elizabeth Lewis 










7 
















Fannie Nast Gamble 


40 


22 










57 
100 


^ 


Isabel Hart Girls 


47 


72 
45 








s 


































Total for Hinghwa. Conference. . 

KiANGSi Conference 
Rulison Fish High 

School Kiukiang . . . 

Anderson Day School. Kiukiang. . . 


10 

1 
1 
4 

6 

7 
6 
2 
2 

1 

30 


F 
M F 

M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
F 


6 
4 

i 

■"4 

9 


54 

23 

4 

16 

15 
9 

10 
2 
5 

17 

101 


187 

31 

26 

106 

"30 

"36 
229 


379 

83 

84 

360 

290 
287 
185 
79 
97 
125 

1590 


72 

77 
15 
45 

30 


69 
81 


50 

26 






757 

298 
125 
511 

320 
287 
215 
79 
105 
348 

2288 


110 

144 
5 

23 

112 
284 


392 

96 

26 

235 

48 
24 
42 
10 
21 
140 

642 


13 












Hwangmei District 












North Kiangsi School. Kiukiang. . . 
Day Schools, District. Nanchang. . 
Day Schools, District . F u River . . . 




































8 
62 

237 












Baldwin Girls School. Nanchang. . 
Total for Kiangsi Conference . . . 


85 
166 


40 
66 


— 




1:^ 



* Using College Building. 



144 



Statistics 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 





o 
o 

s 


a 

3 

"o 

X 

in 


u 

B 
Z 


(U 

H 


Pupils 
Day and Boarding 


c 

Pi 

"v 


C! 
BD 

•3 


a 

3 
(ii 

s: 


'0 

a 

3 

z 




Name and Location of Schools 


c 
11 

u 

M 

•0 

c 

3 


E 

1 


E 

1) 


V 


J3 


"a 
B 

z 


u 

V 
XI 




a 
3 




a 

•3 


BY Conferences 


c 

"v 



z 


'3 
m 

"o 
u 

V 

6 
3 
Z 


North China Conference 

Day Schools, District, Ching Cliao. 


5 

1 

1 

17 

1 

2 
3 

1 
2 

1 
4 
1 
4 
5 
1 

1 
8 

58 

1 

5 
1 

1 
3 
2 

13 

1 

1 
9 
2 

1 

1 

14 

1 

1 
I 

1 
1 

1 

21 

1 
3 
13 

73 


M F 

F 

F 

M F 

F 

M F 
M F 

F 

F 

M F 
M F 

F 
M F 
M F 

F 

F 
M F 


1 

5 

"l 
2 

"4 
"1 

14 

1 

2 


5 

1 

2 

19 

18 

1 

7 

7 

12 

3 
5 

22 
4 
5 

11 

2 
8 




141 

36 

23 

405 












141 

36 

43 

405 

319 

56 

211 

30 

245 

67 
108 
202 

88 
81 
27 

44 

176 


6 

1 

18 

20 

145 


120 

36 

43 

232 

115 

56 
211 




Lang Fang Boarding 

School Ching Chao. 












^ 


Holt Boarding School Lanhsien . . . 


20 






















s 


Gamewell School .... Peiping .... 


38 


146 


135 






6 


Kindergartens, 

District Peiping .... 


56 




1 


Day Schools, District. Peiping . . . . 


211 














School of Nursing. . . . Peiping .... 










30 






20 


96 

47 
108 


49 


100 






135 

4 

6 

101 

i 

27 

19 

2 


102 

32 
34 
103 
30 
13 
22 

23 
63 


10 


Boarding School, 

District Shanhaikiian 








If" 














7 


Keen School Tientsin . . . . 


18 
3 
5 


114 


70 






-} 


Day Schools, City . . .Tientsin. . . . 


15 


70 
76 


s 












-> 


School of Nursing. . .Tientsin. . . . 








27 


1 


Boarding School, 




22 
176 


22 








4 












? 




155 

24 
20 


360 
36 










Total for North China 


F 

M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 


132 

7 

9 
1 

1 
4 
2 


91 


1411 


205 
5 


57 


2279 

65 

170 
20 
30 
84 
55 

424 

90 

170 

575 
110 

18 

363 

1623 

106 

100 

36 

50 
180 

40 

1399 

90 
315 
1962 


485 

56 

32 
' "5 


1235 

54 

82 
8 


46 


Shantung Conference 
Davis Boarding 

School Taianf u .... 


S 


Day School;'. City 




150 
20 
30 

84 
55 


4 












1 


Day Schools, District. Tsinan .... 


























35 
19 


1 














-> 
















Total Shantung Conference. . . . 

West China Conference 

Girls High School . . . Chengtu .... 


F 
M F 


24 

*32 

9 

3! 

6 

1 
9 
43 
16 
9 
2 

5 

7 

6 

63 

10 
11 
36 




339 


44 


36 


5 


90 


93 
90 


198 
45 


11 

•> 


Harmony Crossett 

Day School Chengtu .... 


50 

480 

"98 
73 


100 
45 
90 

18 
190 


20 








1 








50 




85 


4 


Manchu Girls School .Chengtu. . . . 
Asbury Woman's 


M F 

F 
M F 
M F 

F 

F 
M F 

F 
M F 

M 

M F 

F 

F 

M F 

.... 


"2 
2 

1 

1 

3 

3 
3 

17 


20 








? 
















Dewey School C hengt u . . . 


75 
1550 

84 












185 


^ 










1? 


Caldwell Girls School. Tzechow . . . 


22 
100 






106 
100 


80 

27 


^ 


Girls Piigh School. . .Chungking.. 

Kindergarten Chungking. 

Woman's Industrial 

School Chungking. 

Deh Gin Primary.. .DsenJaiNgai 
Night School for 

Servants Chungking. . 

Day Schools, City 

and District Chungking. 

Stevens Memorial 

School Suining .... 

Day Schools, City. . .Suining. . . . 
Day Schools, District. Suining. . . . 












^ 


36 
























50 




4 


1 




180 










1 










40 




7 




120 


1100 


179 








19 


90 








83 
' '44 

423 


48 

29 

248 






275 
1782 

3780 








40 


^ 


180 
2108 










212 






270 




Total for West China 

Conference 


296 


857 




7227 


758 


54 



* 6 are full time teachers. 



Foreign Statistics 145 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 







"o 


Lh 




Pupils 
Day and Boarding 




c 






J3 


J3 
































fc 


rt 


















« 


to 




2 


H 


















■3 


8 


























K 


J3 










>. 


r 












W 


s. 






c 


E 












m 


13 




o 














































u 


P-. 


d 






b 


d. 










£ 


a 


E 


o 




> 




1 


u 


t3 


j: 


E 


Lh 




'•3 


1) 
m 





2 


c 

t5 


to 


i 


to 


o 


O 


O 






Yenping Conference 
Fuller Memorial 

School Yenping. . . 

Gamble Memorial 

School Yenping. . . 

City Day School. . . .Hsia-Tao. . 
Day School, District .Chanhusan 
Day Schools, City 

and District Suichang . . 

Day Schools, City 

and District Sashien . . . 

Day Schools, City . . . Yuki 

Day Schools, City. . . Yankeo. . . 



Total for Yenping Conference. 
INDIA 



Bengal Conference 
Ushagram Boarding 

School 

Day Schools, District 
Day Schools, District 
English Girls High 

School 

Day Schools, Bengali 
Day Schools, Hindi. . 
English Girls High 

School 

Alma J. Keventer 

School 

Jidato, Santali 

Day Schools, District 

Santali 



Asansol . . 
Asansol . . 
Birbhum . 

Calcutta . 
Calcutta.. 
Calcutta . 

Darjeeling 



Pakur. 
Pakur. 



Pakur. 



Total for Bengal Conference . 

Bombay Conference 

Boarding School Basim .... 

Nursery and Day 

Schools Basim .... 

Day Schools, Marathi. Bombay. . 
Day Schools, Gujarati Bombay. . 
Girls Normal School .Nagpur. . 

Mecosa Bagh Nagpur . . 

Day Schools Nagpur . . 

Taylor High School. Poona. . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . Poona. ... 
Hillman Memorial 

Boarding School. . .Telegaon. 
Boarding School 

Hostel Puntamba 

Total for Bombay Conference 



F 
M F 
M F 



M F 
M F 



M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 



M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 

F 
M F 
M F 

F 
M F 

M F 

F 



146 
72 



99 
351 
196 

123 

245 

54 



70 
163 



411 
1804 



38 
217 

12 
160 



48 

"is 

130 

' 4 

23 

28 
30 

3 

284 

12 
9 



182 
116 



216 
351 
214 

362 

245 

58 



112 
208 



414 
2334 



85 

51 
224 
131 

28 
160 
230 
147 
172 

119 

60 

1407 



61 
150 



22 
63 

'96 

85 

60 

384 



60 

47 



237 



139 

82 
22 

225 

55 

2 



83 
163 



44 
950 



15 
26 

4 

26 

61 

12 

118 

7 

107 

60 

521 



146 



Statistics 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



1 


"o 
o 

1 
B 

2 


a 

3 

a. 

K 


"o 

u 

V 

s 

3 


V 

1 


Pupils 
Day and Boarding 


d 
u 

.■3 
1 



S 

•0 

a 
rt 
u 

_c 
•3 

S3 

n 


.■3 
0, 

s, 

a 
.2 

1 


"o 

G 

3 

z 




Naur and Location of Schools 


Bt 





S 


■a 




13 
B 

Z 


fc 


a 

3 

I 


Bt 

C 

•■3 


BY Conferences 


c 

1 


> 

2 


•3 

PQ 

B 

3 

2 


■Central Provinces Conference 


1 

1 
11 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 
6 
2 
1 

28 

42 

2 

26 

2 
38 

2 
21 

2 
10 


M F 

M F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

M F 
F 

F 
M F 
M F 

F 

M F 
M F 
M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 

F 
M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 

F 

F 

M F 

F 
M F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 

M F 

M F 
M F 


2 

i 

3 

i 
1 

"i 

9 
1 

9 

2 
"3 

5 


5 

11 
12 

23 
6 

1 

7 

2 
6 
2 
7 

82 

47 
5 

44 

22 

38 

3 

21 

23 
13 

216 

10 
30 

4 

30 

6 

30 

7 
11 

28 

16 
65 

237 

7 
10 

1 

5 

13 

12 
10 

7 

65 






29 

121 
160 

197 
175 

30 
69 


15 

28 






9 
16 


53 

165 
160 

407 
175 

30 
111 

20 
62 
30 
98 

1311 

1256 

75 

781 

251 

1167 

79 

444 

273 
351 

4677 

121 

260 

59 

442 
158 
828 

89 
121 

384 

192 
1265 

3919 

112 
194 

21 

64 

238 

172 
215 
171 

1187 


39 
100 

369 

" "88 
20 


43 

161 
70 

347 
10 

12 
96 

20 


? 


Alderman Girls 

School Jagdalpur . . 






s 


Day Schools. District. Jagdalpur . . 








Johnson Girls High 






123 


77 




10 


n 








? 


Mission Compound 














1 








39 






3 
20 


6 


■Christian Normal 














62 
30 

42 

915 

1244 
75 

778 

91 

1128 

79 

6 

136 
351 

3888 

96 

260 

59 

299 
146 
828 

44 
121 
376 

135 
1265 

3629 

35 
37 

5 
10 




































45 

250 

12 


77 




11 
69 


90 

706 

217 

200 
417 

82 

175 


98 

857 

568 

11 

467 

250 

953 

7 

191 

227 
144 

2818 

117 

230 

54 

254 


7 


Total for Central Provinces 






36 


Gujarat Conference 

Day Schools, District. Ahmedabad. 








Day Schools, City . . .Nadiad 




















3 

113 
39 










Webb Memorial Girls 

School . Baroda 






47 






4 


Day Schools, District. Central. . . . 








Day Schools, City . . .Godhra. . . . 




















438 
91 










Normal and Practice 








46 




7 
















696 
15 


47 


46 


10 




Total for Gujarat Conference. . 


145 

1 

26 

4 

1 

5 

27 

1 
11 
33 

2 
41 

152 

1 
7 

1 

1 
14 

1 

8 
5 

38 




11 


Hyderabad Conference 






5 


Day Schools, District. Bidar 

Day Schools, District. Ekele 




















? 


Stanley Girls High 






73 
12 


60 




10 


6 


Day Schools, Hindi. .Hyderabad . 
Day Schools, Telugu . Hyderabad . 
Frances C. Davis 






T 












83 

72 
412 

t86 

1] 

55 

163 
315 


659 

87 

31 

343 

179 
1082 

3036 

75 
57 

19 

59 
138 

168 

197 

76 

789 








28 


2 




15 


Q 










Day Schools, District. Tandur. . . . 






8 
30 








^ 










27 


■\ 


Day Schools, District.Vikarabad. . 
Total for Hyderabad Conference 

Avery Girls Boarding 

School Ajmer 

Day Schools, District. Ajmer 

Wilson Sanitorium 













166 
11 


62 

*16 




62 
*13 


?Q 




37 
157 

16 

43 

238 

89 
194 
122 

896 


8 












Girls BoardingSchool.Hissar 

Day Schools District. Hissar 


11 








8 










Lucie F. Harrison 

Boarding School. ..Lahore 


38 
"49 

174 


45 
21 








5 








5 














88 


16 




13 




Total for Indus River 




?6 







♦Attending other institutions. 



t Some attending other institutions. 



Foreign Statistics 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



147 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 



£ ? 









PUPI 


LS 








-*-> 






Day and Boarding 




01 
T3 


m 














(G 


Q 






























a 


& 


















■3 


a 
01 





















to 


c 




CIS 

E 










m 


•a 
c 


1-1 
U 
























a, 


cu 










3 


cm 

c 




V 

•a 


% 


^ 


T) 


JS 


B 


Ih 




•E 


B 
















rt 






















i4 


-J 


X 


^ 


a 


z 


o 


H 


pa 


Z 



LucKNOw Conference 
Day Schools, District 
Sawtelle Girls School 
Day Schools, District 
Day Schools, District 
Hudson Memorial 

School 

Girls High 

District School, Boys. 
Day Schools, District. 

Chambers Memorial 

School 

Lai Bagh Girls School 
Day Schools, District. 
Indiana Girls School . 



Arrah 

Arrah 

Ballia 

Buxar 

Cawnpore . 
Cawnpore. 
Cawnpore. 
Basti and 
Gonda. . . . 



Gonda 

.Lucknow. . . 
Tirhoot .... 
Muzaffarpur 



Total for Lucknow Conference . 

North India Conference 

Girls School Bareilly. . 

Warne Baby Fold. . .Bareilly. . 
Day Schools, District Bareilly. . 
Lois L. Parker Girls 

School Bijnor. . . . 

Day Schools, District. Bijnor. . . 
Sigier Girls School . . . Budaun . . 
Normal Training 

School Budaun . . 

Primary Boys School . Budaun . . 
Day Schools, District. Budaun. . 
Gill Girls School, 

Pauri Garhwal . . 

Day Schools, District . Garhwal . . 

Boarding School Hardoi. . . 

Girls BoardingSchool.Sitapur. . . 
Primary Boys School. Sitapur. . . 
Day Schools, District. Hardoi- 

Sitapur 

Girls BoardingSchool. Pithoragarh 
Champawat Day 

School, Eastern. . . Kumaun . 
Dav Schools, Eastern Kumaun . 
Wellesley Girls High 

School Naini Tal 

Adams Girls School. . Almora. . . 
Normal Training 

School Almora. . . 

Girls Boarding School . Diwarahat 
Day Schools, District .Naini Tal 

and Kumaon Districts 
Girls BoardingSchool. Moradabad. 
Normal Training 

School ■. Moradabad. 

Parker Branch School. Moradabad. 
Day Schools, District. Moradabad. 
Christian Girls 

School Shahjahanpur 

Day Schools. Dist.. .Shahjahanpur 

Total for North India 

Conference 



M F 
M F 

M 
M F 

M F 
M F 

M 

Rep 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 



M F 
M F 
M F 

M F 

M F 

F 

F 

M 

M F 

M F 
M F 
M F 

F 

M 

M F 

M F 

M F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

F 
M F 

M F 
M F 

F 

M 

M F 

M F 
M F 



340 



46 



35 



205 



60 

98 
82 
129 

99 
52 
75 



123 
15 
50 



137 

249 

71 
194 
34 



115 
591 

70 

237 

19 

61 



212 
64 



127 
565 



60 
146 



3280 



22 
127 



60 
150 

82 
129 

184 
115 
107 



143 

390 

15 

75 



1450 



231 

29 
249 

124 
194 
100 

16 
115 
591 

102 
237 
76 
140 
120 

33 
95 

10 
64 

89 
194 

12 
102 

212 
141 

16 
141 
565 

225 
146 



127 
54 
36 



151 
154 



185 
52 



60 
108 



85 



55 
144 

82 



174 

106 

53 



151 
324 



75 



220 

49 

183 

120 

184 
94 

16 
110 
591 

94 
187 

56 
110 

94 

33 
85 

9 
16 

78 
94 



35 
126 

15 
106 
500 

195 
146 



148 



Statistics 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 







"o 


u 




Pupils 
Day and Boarding 




•a 


JO 






i s 












a 

3 






















2^ 


















"oj 


3 


o 
g 






















o 


m 


a 

3 

0-, 






1) 


S3 


E 










CO 


■o 


u 


o 

u 

V 


a 




1 


(5 


£ 


01 








a 

3 




o 

L4 


B 

3 

Z 


o 

X 


'S 
o 


_> 
2 


41 

■a 

a 

5 


1 

o 


0) 
Of 


T3 

is 


J3 
M 


O 
2 


o 


•3 


T3 

o 


J3 

a 

3 
2 



Northwest India Conference 
Girls Vocational 

School Aligarh 

Louisa Soule School. .Aligarh 

Day Schools, District. Aligarh 

City and District 

Schools Anupsharh 

and Bulandsharh 
Butler Memorial 

School Delhi 

Day Schools, City . . . Delhi 

Central Burgess 

School Ghaziabad . . 

Night School Ghaziabad.. 

Day Scliools, District. Ghaziaoad. . 
Plested Memorial 

School Meerut 

Central and District 

Schools Meerut 

Blackstone School . . . Muttra 

Holman Institute. . . .Agra 

School of Nursing. . . Brindaban. . 

Day Schools, District. Muttra 

Day Schools, District 

Muzaffarnagar 

Village Schools Roorkee. 

Girls School Roorkee. 

Day Schools, District.Rahtak. . 

Total for Northwest India 
Conference 



South India Conference 
Baldwin Girls High 

School -Bangalore 

Girls High School ... Belgaum. 
Watson Caste School. Belgaum. 
Sherman Boarding 

School Belgaum . 

Day Schools, City . . . Belgaum . 
Day Schools, District. Belgaum . 
Day Schools, District. Bowringpet 
Day Schools, District. Gokak. . 
Day Schools, City . . .Gulbarga 
Day Schools, District. Gulbarga 
Girls High School. . . . Kolar. . . 
Day Schools, City.. .Kolar. . . 
School of 

Compounding Kolar. . . 

School of Nursing. . . . Kolar. . . 
Graff Baby Fold. . . . Kolar. . . 
Skidmoie Memorial. . Madras . 
Day Schools, City , . . Madras . 
Girls Boarding School. Raichur. 
Day Schools, District. Raichur. 

Total for South India 

Conference 



No 
10 

1 

16 

2 

2 

No 

15 



No 



F 
M F 
M F 



M F 

M F 
M F 

M F 
Rep 
M F 



M F 
M F 
M F 
Rep 
M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 



M F 
F 
F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

F 
F 

Rep 

F 

F 
M F 
M F 



167 



207 



25 



100 
105 

22 



608 



34 
il4 



15 

187 

134 

70 

142 

20 

50 

40 

231 



71 
227 

48 
138 



131 

75 



432 



311 



38 



40 
136 
156 



332 
137 



40 
136 
156 



167 

129 
71 

131 

75 

187 

332 
137 
345 

243 

100 

105 

81 

50 



2485 



117 
124 
164 

44 
229 
134 

99 
142 

71 
167 
220 
231 



15 

146 

278 

97 

138 



Foreign Statistics 



149 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 

















Pupils 














O m 




Day and Boarding 




0) 

•a 






^•s 
































s g 


















^ 


rn 




2 ^ 


















■3 


o 

























O 








>» 


>> 












K 






Cfl 


^ 








cd 












m 


■X3 




o, 
















































S 


(ll 


a 


0) 

> 




Oh 


CL, 










3 


C 


3 
2 


"o 


.Hf 


4) 
13 


1 


J3 


•o 


JS 


E 


1-1 


"(3 


T3 


x 

di 


1 




S 

a 


5 


iS 




o 
2 


O 


o 






JAPAN 

Japan Conference 

Fukuoka Jo Gakko. .Fukuoka. 

YohanoKlindergarten.Fukuoka . 

lai Jo Gakko Hakodate 

Dickerson Memorial 

School Hakodate 

Pascoe Memorial 

School Hakodate 

Hirosaki Jo Gakko . .Hirosaki. . 

Alexander Memorial 

School Hirosaki . . 

Aiko Kindergarten . .Hirosaki. . 

Kei Ai Kindergarten. Kagoshima 

City Kindergarten.. .Kumamota 

Kwassui Jo Gakko . .Nagasaki. . 

Kindergartens Nagasaki. . 

Lee Memorial School. Sendai. . . . 

Yonezawa Kinder- 
garten Sendai .... 

Aoyama Jo Gakuin. .Tokyo. . . . 

Kindergartens Yokohama 

Total for Japan Conference. . . 



KOREA 
KoRE.A. Conference 
Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, District 
Eiu Chung School . . . 
Day Schools, City. . . 
Chung Eui High 

School 

Blind School 

Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . 
Day Schools, City . . . 

Kindergartens 

Ewha High School. . . 
Day Schools, District, 
Day Schools, District, 
Day Schools, District, 
Day Scliools, District, 



Chemulpo. 
Chunan. . . 

Haiju 

Kongju. . . 

Pyengyang 
Pyengi'ang 
Pyengyang 
Chiunampo 
Kang Saw. 
Sari Wan . 
Sin Chang 
Seoul .... 
Seoul .... 
Seoul .... 
Suwon . . . 
Wonju. . . 
Yengbven 
Yi Chun . 



Total for Korea Conference. 



91 .. 



F 

M F 

F 



M F 
F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

F 
M F 



M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

F 

F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 

F 
M F 
M F 
M F 
M F 



54 

30 

70 

130 



112 
56 
42 

118 



304 

242 

1278 

126 

52 

"so 



60 
174 
198 

80 



559 
80 



60 
95 
65 
65 
28 
1339 



318 
216 



1200 
911 



523 
83 



290 2922 2366 3451 201 686 



1024 
2461 



102 
160 



335 

40 

353 



71 
339 

54 
30 
70 
130 
468 
80 
40 

35 

1126 

288 



671 
136 
360 
354 

359 

21 

1564 

1248 

1343 

191 

80 

1339 

157 

327 

335 

174 

902 

163 



35 



20 
118 



98 9724 222 5137 50 



150 



Statistics 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 







o 




o 




j: 








w 


.2 






o 


a 

3 


u 


cu 


XI 




F 






51 


2 


C/} 



E ? 



Pupils 
Day and Boarding 



MALAYA 

Malaya Conference 
Methodist Girls 

School Singapore . . 

Fairfield Girls School Singapore . . 

Ninde Home Singapore . . 

Lindsay Girls School. Penang. . . . 

VVinchell Home . . . .Penang 

Alexandra Home .... Penang 

A. C. G. S Ipoh 

Boarding School Ipoh 

Lady Treacher Girls 

School Taiping .... 

Crandon Home Taiping. . . . 

Methodist Girls 

School Sitiawan* . . 

Girls Hostel Sitiawan *. . 

Siiydam Girls School .Malacca. . . . 

Shellabear Hall Malacca. . . . 

Methodist Girls 

School Kuala Lumpur 

Holt Hall Kuala Lumpur 

Total for Malaya Conference 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 
CONFERENCE 

St. Paul's Kinder- 
garten Manila 

Harris Memorial 

Kindergarten Manila 

Central Church 

Kindergarten Manila 

Cabanatuon Kinder- 
garten Cabanatuon 

School of Nursing. . . Manila 



Total for Philippine Islands 
Conference 



SUMATRA MISSION 
CONFERENCE 

Methodist Girls School . Medan. . . 

Home Training School .Landjong 

Bale! 

Total for Sumatra Mission 
Conference 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
No 
1 
1 



F 
F 
F 
F 
F 
Rep 
F 
F 



M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 
F 



M F 
F 



123 
160 



130 



109 
699 



299 
224 



260 



152 



130 

25 



1570 



191 
60 



117 
1 

78 



34 
281 



70 
150 
59 
50 
12 

38 
3 



786 
594 

59 
645 

12 

421 
6 



60 

10 

326 

100 

521 
46 



147 



156 



* 1933 figures. 



Foreign Statistics 151 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 

For the year ending October 1, 1934 

Covering the last complete school year ending within this period 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 



5 H 



Pupils 
Day and Boarding 



EUROPE AND 
NORTH AFRICA 

Bulgaria Conference 
American School for 

Girls Lovetch. . 

Italy Conference 

Crandon Institute. . .Rome*. . . 



North African Conference 
II Maten Kabylia. . 

Total for Europe and North 
Africa Conferences 



LATIN AMERICA 

Mexico Conference 

Colegio "Juarez". . . . Guanajuato 
"Escuela Moderna" .Me.^coCityf 
Industrial School. . . .Mexico City 
Aztecas Night School. Mexico City 
San Vincente School, 

District Mexico City 

Ludlow Institute .... Pachuca. . 
Normal Institute. . . .Puebla. . . 
Day School, District .Apizaco. . 

Total for Mexico Conference . 



SOUTH AMERICA 

Eastern South America 
Conference 
Crandon Institute. . . Montevideo* 
Colegio Norte 

Americano RosarioJ . 

Gleason Institute. . . .Rosarioj . 

Total for Eastern South 
America Conference 



North Andes Conference 

Lima High School. . .Lima, Peru 



Total for North Andes 
Conference 



M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 

M F 



M F 



M F 
M F 



M F 



72 
160 
127 

75 



504 



183 

249 
249 



110 

32 
23 



79 



160 
31 



121 
121 



226 



170 
226 

43 
439 



118 

113 

151 

50 

72 
380 
325 

98 

1307 



111 

72 



539 

383 
383 



183 
17 



200 



50 
102 



* 1931 figures. 



t Sarah L. Keen School. 



t 1933 figures 



152 



Statistics 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS— BIBLE TRAINING SCHOOLS 



Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 







o 




o 




£1 








w 










a 




3 


u 


Di 


JH 


t4-> 


F 






W 



E ? 





01 

> 




rt 


[i, 


k;; 



Pupils 
Day and Boarding 















03 






B 


















Oh 








D 




(U 


73 


u 




•o 


J3 


K 


s 


O 



.Nanking. 



BURMA 
Woman's Bible Training 

Scliool Pegu, Burmese District' 



Total for Burma Conference. 

CHINA 
Centr.\l Chin.\ 

Hitt B. T. S 

Bible Teachers' Training 

School (Union) Nanking . 

FOOCHOW 

Jewell-Huntley Bible Seminary. Foochow. 

Bible Training School Kutien. . . 

Bible Training School Mintsing. 

Hinghwa 

Juliet Turner B. T. S Hinghwa. 

Frieda Knoechel B. T. S Sienyu. . . 

KlANGSI 

Knowles Bible Training School .Kiukiang. 
North China 

Thompson B. T. S Changli . . 

Union Bible Training School. . .Peiping. . 

Woman's B. T. S Peiping . . 

Shantung 

Terry Bible School Tai'an . . . 

West Chin.\ 

DeWitt Training School Tzechow. 

Yenping 

Bible Training School Yenping. . 



Total for China. 



INDIA 
Central Provinces 

Hawa Bagh Training College . .Jubbulpore. 

Thoburn Biblical Institute Gadarwaraf 

Gujarat 

Nicholson School of Theology. . Barodat ■ ■ . 
North India 

Woman's School, Theological 

Seminary Bareillyt ■ • . 

Total for India 



JAPAN 
Woman's Department, 

Theological School Tokyo . 



KOREA 
New Jersey Conference B. T. S. . . . Pyenyang . 
Union Theological Seminary Seoul 



Total for Korea . 



MALAYA 
Eveland Seminary Singapore! . 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Harris Memorial B. T. S Manila 

Mary Brown Townsend, Bible 

Training School Lingayen . . . 



Total for Philippine Islands 

LATIN AMERICA 
Mexico 

Bible Training School Mexico City 



Total for all fields 



















































1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


F 

F 

F 
F 

F 

F 
F 

F 

F 
F 
F 

F 

F 

F 

F 
M F 

F 

M F 


4 

1 

} 

1 
1 

3 

"l 

1 
1 

1 


9 

4 

4 
3 

1 

4 
S 

11 

4 
1 
5 

3 

6 

5 
























































































































































14 

1 
2 

1 
1 


16 

2 

1 

1 
1 


65 

1 

4 

5 


























































5 

1 

1 
1 


F 

F 
M F 


5 

2 

3 
5 


15 

9 

6 
6 

















































2 

1 

1 
1 


F 

F 
F 


8 

1 

3 
1 


12 


















9 
8 
17 

3 
121 
































2 
1 


M F 


4 

2 
38 
































27 






.... 





39 
13 
50 

30 

50 

23 

524 



1 
116 



100 

57 



57 
47 
104 

45 
1086 



524 



18 
116 



193 



100 
57 



57 
47 
104 

45 
1086 



* This sciiool has not been in session during the time covered by this report but 4 of our Pupils have been cared for ml 

the Baptist Training School by our paying only their tuition. ° 

t 1933 figures. t 1 teacher is for women alone, 4 teachers in both men's and women's schools. I 



Foreign Statistics 
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS— COLLEGES 






153 


; Name and Location of Schools 
BY Conferences 


1 
S 

o 
1-1 

E 


a 

3 
X 


"o 

E 

3 




Pupils Day 
and Boarding 


3 
11 



K 
•a 

3 

CJ 
M 

a 

•3 

a 


m 


a 

3 

3 
■s 
*n 

"0 

u 

J3 

E 
3 
Z 




3 

u 

bo 


O 


bn 

"o 
U 


a 

3 

H 
1 


3 

■•3 


3 
M 


1 


'3 

CQ 

"0 

u 
XI 

E 
3 
Z 


lWoman's Foreign Missionary Society 
Woman's College of South 

China, Hwa Nan Foochow, China. . 

Kwassui College Nagasaki, Japan . 

Total for W. F. M. S 


1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
5 


F 

F 

F 
F 
F 
F 


8 
2 

10 


15 
14 

29 






70 
73 

143 

202 
22 
46 
27 
47 

174 


70 

73 

143 

202 
22 
46 
27 
47 

174 


53 
34 

87 


70 
50 

120 
15 


5 






2 






~7 


Union Colleges 

Ginling College Nanking, China*. 

Yenching College Peiping, China. . . 

West China University Chengtu, China. . 

Cheeloo University Shantung, China . 


















i 
4 








45 
143 












27 

47 

118 












Isabella Thoburn College. . . Lucknow, India. . 


1 


F 


11 


15 






7 








St. Christopher's Training 

College Vepery, Madras, India* 

Woman's Christian College. Tokyo, Japan. . . . 
Ewha College Seoul, Korea 

Total for Union Colleges 

Grand Total for Colleges 


1 
1 
2 

13 

15 


F 
F 
F 


3 

1 

13 

33 

43 


2 
18 
32 

67 

96 






91 

92 

249 

950 

1093 


91 

92 

249 

950 

1093 

• 


75 


85 








9 






126 
389 
476 


207 
499 


3 






19 


619 


?6 









* 1933 figures. 



t Partial report. 

SUMMARY BY FIELDS 







Number of 






Pupils 






S 










Teachers 






(Dat and Boarding) 








■3 

■p. 

3 
PL, 

3 






























Bi 




CS 






















** 


.52 


a 


FIELDS 









a 

fc4 


1" 


>. 












a 
0! 





2 
■3 
PQ 




J 


a 




1 

a 






■3 
"2 


J3 
tlO 


hi 




j3 


1 


bD 

a 


1 

a 

3 


hi 
1 




2: 


te 


2; 


M 


1-1 


a 


S 


W 


•z. 





H 


m 


•z 


Z 



\frica 

\SIA 

Burma 

- China 

India 

Japan 

Korea 

Malaya 

Sumatra 

Philippine Islands 

UROPE 

Bulgaria 

Italy 

-*JoRTH Africa 

Latin America 

Mexico 

South America 

SiBLE Training Schools 

20LLEGEst 

Totals 



1257 



34 

74 
917 
1577 
206 
290 
119 
9 
10 

15 

30 

2 



3578 



556 



1952 
785 
936 

2922 



52 



851 
10246 
9768 



2366 

699 

79 



504 
432 



121 

331 
3544 
10640 



3451 

1570 

25 



341 
165 



229 
1819 
2479 



201 

822 



134 

345 
563 
2461 
686 
281 



121 



369 

1176 

160 



226 



220 

13 

1086 

143 



4069 



1034 

1545 

18277 

25557 

3557 

9724 

3875 

164 

147 

170 
226 
43 

1307 
922 

1086 
143 



67777 



621 

185 

2190 

6111 

118 

222 

249 

13 

51 

183 
17 



308 
83 

737 
87 



735 

510 

5226 

16148 

796 

5137 

1037 

39 

147 

167 



584 

92 

1027 

120 



31765 



184 

388 

41 

50 

19 

1 



724 



t Union Colleges not included. 



154 Statistics 

MEDICAL STATISTICS, 


1933-1934 












Staff 


Hospital 




Foreign 


Indigenous 


u 

V 

u 

o 

u 

u 
x: 

O 


to 

■(3 
o 
H 


09 


a 
1 


a! 

Q 
c 


c 
2 

2 

a 
O 


a 
g 

1 

a 
O 

O 

c 

is 


S 
O 

1 ! 

1 


NAME AND LOCATION 

OF HOSPITAL 

OR DISPENSARY 


Q 


3 

z 

t-l 

c 
o 


o 

u 


Q 

u 

11 

O 


1-4 

o 

CI 

o 
Q 


1 

3 


V 

u 

3 

z 

"S, 

3 


AFRICA 
Mutambara, Rhodesia 

Riley Dispensary 




1 
1 

2 
2 


1 

1 


2 

4 

2 

1 

2 
1 


"l 

5 

10 

7 
3 

6 

6 


1 

3 

27 

41 

15 
3 

15 

11 


4 

3 

5 

1 

2 
3 


7 
6 

39 

62 

25 

7 

27 

22 
3 

20 

45 

16 

41 
1 

5 
20 

34 
18 
36 
33 
11 
11 

2 
2 

9 

7 

3 

113 

23 
5 

10 
65 


15 

§18 

80 

87 

100 
50 

90 

50 
15 

60 

75 

70 

SO 
20 


588 
950 

721 

1365 

1139 
658 

607 

318 
42 

713 

1375 

528 

631 
140 


4387 
8543 

9273 

21577 

12626 

5388 

4249 

6878 
408 

4478 

16322 

3963 

8913 
520 






31 

1& 

134 

129 

241 
209 

100 

173 

372 

173 

184 
1.23 


Washburn Memorial (Union) .... 
CHINA 
Chungking 

Gamble Memorial 




5 
52 
99 

17 

40 
6 

29 

81 

20 

41 
4 


18 

184 

127 
78 

336 

22 

140 

51 

54 

64 
23 


Foochow 

Foochow Christian Union (Magaw 
Memorial) 




Futsing 

Lucie F. Harrison 




Woolston Memorial Dispensary . . 








Klukiang 

Elizabeth S. Danforth Memorial. . 
Mintsing 


1 


2 




*Gaing 


Nanchang 

Women's and Children's 








1 

2 

1 

2 

1 


7 

10 

3 

6 


9 
30 

8 
27 


3 

2 
2 
4 


Peiping 

Sleeper-Davis Memorial 




1 

1 
2 




Sienyu 

Margaret Eliza Nast Memorial. . . 
Tientsin 


1 


Haitang Dispensary 




Shanhatkuan Dispensary 


1 
1 

1 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 






2 
1 

3 
3 
6 
4 
3 
2 

2 
2 
2 

1 

21 

10 

2 

3 
6 


' 17 

24 
12 
19 
16 

2 


2 

1 

3 
1 
6 
8 
6 
4 


Chengtu School of Midwifery . . . 




















INDIA 
Bareilly 

Clara A. Swain Memorial 

Baroda 

Mrs. William Butler Memorial. . . 
Brindaban 

Sarah E. Creighton Memorial. . . . 
Kolar 

Ellen Thoburn Cowen Memorial. . 
Sironcha 


2 
1 
3 
2 

2 




1 

2 
1 


70 
80 
50 
70 
30 
80 

11 

15 
7 


803 
290 

747 
815 
324 
113 


5532 

3888 

12676 

13706 

7631 

21854 


115 

70 
69 

8 


32 

21 

212 

327 

5 


4 

53 
i -* 
40 

53 

106 

15 


Tilaunia 

Mary Wilson Sanatorium 


Dispensaries 
Champawat 

Phulbari 




15 


3 


*Jagdalpur 

Ruth Cummins Hospital 














146 

728 
123 


1600 

2628 
1835 




Pakur 

Edith Jackson Fisher Memorial. . 








1 
1 

9 

2 

1 

1 


3 

37 

2 
52 


3 
5 

1 

38 

10 

1 

4 
3 


25 


155 
3 


7 
5 


Pithoragarh 








Puntamba 

Bowen Bruere Memorial 






1 

3 


KOREA 
Pyengyang 


2 


3 

1 
1 

1 
2 


75 
30 


1828 
960 


15939 
8764 


290 
8 


755 
68 


62 
452 


Seoul 






Kongju and Taiden Infant Wel- 
fare Centers 




12 
120 


1895 


3676 
29437 








PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 
Manila 

Mary J. Johnston Memorial 

MEXICO 


1 


51 


104 


608: 


JOthers 




2 












2 











































Totals 


14 


32 


6 


38 


140 


375 


125 


730 


1430 


18547 


23669 1' 1030 


2794 


3096 


♦General Board property loaned 

tin union institutions figures un 

Other figures (except appropriations) 

JTwo W. F. M. S. nurses are se 


to\ 
den 

are 
rvin 


N. F 
niss 
of I 
g in 


. ]\ 
on 

lOS 

W 


i. S 

ary 
pita 
ahu 


loct 
as 
Gen 


ors a 
a whc 
eral I 


id rr 

)le. 

4os[ 


lissio 
)ital. 


nary 


nurses j 


;ive W. I 


'.M. 


S. pers 


onnel 



Medical Statistics 
MEDICAL STATISTICS, 1933-1934 



155 



Out-Patients 


Dispensary 


Receipts 


I 




















•a 






> 


> 

a 


U 
1 


H 

ClJ 


B 

.Si 

a. c 

3 E 

OS 


"3 
o 


"3 
o 

c 


s 

i 

+.» 

1-1 
H 


c 
o 

2 

■ a 
O 


c 




2 o 

.Si 


U 

o 

c 

E 
c 


a 

.2 

a 






















e5 


















3 


rt 










u 


v 


£i 




r,^ 


Ui 


<u 


o 




fi- 


£0 


o 


c. 


U< 


eJ 


O 


— 


H 


fc 


oi 


H 


§ 


cu 


fe 


O 


< 






11 

6 








#27180 
28076 


27190 
29876 






£ 22 
15 


£ 78 
34 


£ 85 


38 


29 




67 


1800 


5 




17 






















$ Mex. 






221 

30 

24 
12 


75 
20 


72 




306 

50 

24 
13 


4050 

5933 

2256 
1180 


10259 

11172 

638 
347 


14309 

17105 

2894 
1527 






30727 

51196 

8029 
3595 




$Mex. 






6579 






13 


204 
291 


4463 




1 




1800 


143 


654 






797 


3827 


3710 


7537 




517 


11341 




67122 










73 


50 


8 


1135 


1258 


4002 


2768 


6770 


278 


1334 


3317 




5159 


1 539 


50 


14 




589 


1158 


2927 


4085 


155 


220 


1021 




197 


164 

72 


571 
385 






735 
1224 


5023 
6053 


7211 
11406 


12234 
17459 


248 
60 


1003 
226 


17114 
37914 




68404 


61 


767 


5391 












964 
3501 


1468 

7747 


2432 
11248 


234 
142 


428 
106 


4480 
26869 




3772 


135 


212 


65 


300 


647 


3933 


52 


51 


10 


160 


263 


986 


60 


1046 


21 


52 


148 




418 






64 
187 

2 






430 
1564 

4079 


974 
2988 

6555 


1404 

4552 

10634 


99 


559 
200 

254 


344 
6016 

Rs. 11855 




2040 


1 679 


1900 

5 




2579 
30 




; 25 




Rs. 6993 


52 


45 




2075 


2172 


2115 


6887 


9002 


193 


101 


116068 




5243 


60 


77 


5 


1809 


1949 


2937 


6895 


9832 


48 


7 


"54583 




10816 


1 39 


7 


19 


11241 


11306 


4175 


13176 


17351 


90 


32 


7017 


600 


11353 


67 


198 


7 


519 


784 


5697 


22344 


28041 


77 




3012 




3874 






3 
1 




43 


746 
1876 


1869 
45 


2615 

1921 
15048 
11949 


66 
15 


77 
2 


8256 

13 

1269 

595 




8858 






300 










722 


21 


18 


3 




39 


3319 


8630 


155 


150 


2615 





200 




100 


300 


1645 


1459 


3104 


27 


9 


79 




3221 


52 


33 


16 


87 


172 


3107 


2060 


5167 


27 




2436 




892 


255 




2 




257 


16368 


48397 


64765 


1244 


627 


Yen 99929 




Yen 2970 


( 29 


18 


30 




47 


1872 


4224 


6096 


132 


81 


14607 




7270 


!• 44 


52 


16 




96 


2293 


12553 


14846 


111 


146 


3927 




1550 


231 


2064 


52 


163 


2458 


246 


2292 


2538 






5559 
Pesos 


100 


1480 






Pesos 


- . . . . 










6556 


17505 


24061 


2140 


500 


44945 




11036 






7 


805 




432 


2577 


3009 


23 


231 


582 






t 








<r 


























3057 


6714 


662 


19161 


28205 


100190 


276399 


391637 


5733 


7357 









§In addition 20 huts are 


urnished 


with m; 


its, accoi 


nmodati 


ig from 


one to five patient 


s in a hut 




ifFirst and return calls. 


















HThe financial statistics i 


nclude be 


th hospi 


tal and t 


raining s 


:hool bu 


t not the baby fok 


which is 


housed in 


one ward of the hospital buih 


iing. 
















°In 


eludes h 


uildin 


I mone> 








6Inclu 


des spec 


ial gifts 









156 Directory of Missionaries 

MISSIONARIES 

OF THE 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 

1869-1934 

a indicates appointed; S sailed; m marriage; s self-supporting; % detached service; 

R retired; r resigned; dis discontinued; del detained; d deceased; * daughter 

of missionaries; c. t. contract teacher; married name in italics; 

abbreviations indicate Branches. 

Aaronson, Hilma A Des M., India, a. 1905, R. 1917 

Abbott, Anna Agnes N. W., India, a. 1901 

Abbott, Edna M Cin., India, a. 1915 

Abel, Edith F Top., China, a. 1915 

Abrams, Minnie F Minn., India, a. 1887, R. 1899, d. 1912 

Adams, Jean Phila., China, a. 1900, 5., d. 1929 

Adams, Lois A Pac, India, S. 1925, m. 1929, Eade 

Adams, Marie N. W., China, a. 1915 

Akers, L. Stella, M.D N. E., China, a. 1882, m. 1885, Perkins 

Albertson, Mildred L Top., India. 5. 1932 

Albertson, Millie May Cin., Korea, a. 1907, d. 1918 

Albertson, Miriam A., M.D Top., India, 5. 1930 

Albrecht, Helen Ruth Cin., Japan, S. 1921, r. 1931 

Aldrich, Sylvia E N. W., China, 5. 1922 

Alexander, V. Elizabeth Cin., Japan, a. 1903 

Allen, Belle J.. M.D Cin. and N. E., Japan and India, a. 1888, R. 1917 

Allen, Mabel Des M., China, a. 1894, R. 1919 

Allen, Mabel E N. W., China, S. 1920 

Ailing. Harriet S N. W., Japan, a. 1894, R. 1912, d. 1916 

Aim, Mrs. Lvdia O (See Oelschlager) 

Amburn, Emma E Des M., Burma, a. 1918, c. i., mm. 1921, m. \9ii,Arnoldl 

Anderson, Dorothea M Des M., India, 5. 1927,* det. 

Anderson, Edla V N. W., China, 5. 1924, d. 1926 

Anderson, Luella R Cin., Malaysia, a. 1900, R. 1924 

Anderson, Mary Phila., N. Africa, a. 1911 

Anderson, Naomi A N. W., Korea, a. 1910, r. 1921, 5. 1928 

Ankeny, Jessie V Des M., China, a. 1908, m. 1913, Lacy 

Appenzeller, Alice R Phila., Korea, a. 1914* 

Appenzeller, Ida H N. E., Japan, a. 1917*, ot. 1919, Crom 

Apple, E. Blanche Top., China, S. 1923 

Arbogast, Gertrude N. W., Mexico, .S'. 1930, c. I., miss., 1935 

Argus, Florence N. Y., India, S. 1930. det. 

Ashbaugh, Adella M Cin., Japan, a. 1908 

Ashbrook, Anna Cin., India, a. 1914, det. 

Ashwill, Agnes Cin., Burma, a. 1908, R. 1926 

Atkins, Ruth Joyce Minn., Philippine Islands, 5. 1921 

Atkins, Ruth Marie N. W., So. America, 5. 1925, m. 1930, Suthers 

Atkinson, Anna P N. Y., Japan, a. 1882. R. 1927 

Atkinson. Mary N. Y.. Japan, a. 1888, dis. 1893 

Ault, Clara V Cin., Africa, a. 1918, m. 1921. Gibbs 

Austin, Laura F Col. R., India, a. 1905 

Ayres. Harriet L Cin., Mexico, a. 1886, R. 1931 

Bachman, Mary V Des M., China, S. 1923, m. 1930. Winter 

Bacon, Edna G N. W.. India, a. 1916 

Bacon, Nettie A N. Y., India, a. 1913 

Badley, Mary Esther Cin., India, S. 1927*, jn. 1931, Burgoyne 

Bahrenburg, Lyra H Top., China, S. 1919, m. 1926, Oakes 

Bailey, Barbara May Top., Japan, 5. 1919 

Bair, Blanche R Des M., Korea, a. 1914 

Baird, Mary N. W., Mexico, S. 1926, c. t., miss. 1928 

Baker, L. Catherine Cin., China, a. 1907, Korea, 1926 

Baldwin, Virginia E N. E., Burma, 5. 1927, m. 1931. Kinney 

Ball. Jennie L N. W., India, a. 1915, r. 

Bangs, Louise N. W., Japan, a. 1911, m. 1925, Truman 

Banning. Elsie N N. W., Korea, 5. 1929 

Barber, Emma J N. W., India, a. 1909 

Barnes. Sylvia M Phila.. Malaya. S. 1925. m. 1928. Thomas 

Barrow, Mrs. M. M.. M.D N. Y.. China, a. 1895. m. 1900, King 

Barry, Elda M Top., India, 5. 1928 

Barstow, Clara G Pac. South America, a. 1912. R. 1929 

Bartlett, Carrie M Des M., China, a. 1904 

Bartlett, Mvrth Pac, China, S. 1923, R. 1932 

Bass, Allie M Des M., India, 5. 1927 

Bassett, Bernice C N. W., Japan. S. 1919, m. 1929. Wyman 

Bates. Grace M Des M.. India, 5. 1922 



Directory of Missionaries 157 



Bates, Ruth E Des M., India, a. 1918, d. 1921 

Battey. C. Frances N. Y. China, a. 1915, r. 1921 

Battin, Lora I N. W., China, 5. 1920 

Baucus, Georgiana N. Y., Japan, a. 1890, s., d. 1926 

Baugh, Evelyn B Pac, China, a. 1907* m. 1921, Krause 

Baumgardner, Lucy E Des M., Mexico, a. 1900, m. 1903, Morton 

Beach, Lucv W N. W., India, S. 1920 

Beale, EUzabeth M Phila., India, a. 1911 

Bear, Irene C N. W., India, S. 1929 

Beard. Bertha M Des M., China, a. 1902, m. 1903, Gasson 

Beatty, Mabel A N. E., China, a. 1916, d. 1927 

Beazell, Laura E N. W., Italy, a. 1900, m. 1903, Andreas 

Beck, Edna L., M.D Pac, India, a. 1902, ?«. 1907, Keisler 

Beck. Rosetta Cin., India, a. 1914, R. 1930 

Becker, Gertrude A Minn., India, S. 1920 

Bedell, Mary E Col. R., China, a. 1917 

Beesemyer, Gertrude S Pac, India, 5. 1926, m. 1930, Reece 

Beggs, Nelle N. W., China, a. 1910, R. 1920, d. 1934 

Beiler, Mary N. E., Korea, a. 1910, m. 1921, Biddle. d. 1935 

Beissell, Ina Mae Phila., South America, 5. 1924, m. 1930, Cross 

Bell, Laura E N. W., India, 5. 1929 

Benard, Helen M Cin., South America, 5. 1921, d. 1923 

Bender, Elizabeth R Bait., Japan, a. 1889, R. 1897 

Benedict, Ruth E N. Y., Korea, a. 1910, m. 1916, Moore 

Bengel, Margaret Cin., Korea, a. 1890, m. 1892, Jones 

Benn. Rachel R., M.D Phila., China, a. 1890, R. 1911, m. 1924, Dunkle, d. 1927 

Bennett, Fannie A N. W., India, a. 1901, R. 1923 

Bennett, Lorraine N. W., China, 5. 1926, Burma, S. 1927, det. 

Bennett, Lulah Grace Des M., Mexico, S. 1920, r. 1922 

Benson, Mildred O Col. R., Africa, S. 1926 

Benthien, Elizabeth M N. W., India and Mexico, a. 1895, R. 1927 

Benton, J. Emma N. E., Japan, a. 1882, m. 1885, Elmer 

Betow, Emma J., M.D Cin., China, a. 1904 

Betz, Blanche A N. W., Mexico, a. 1907, R. 1929, 5. 1930 

Beven. Georgia H Pac, Africa, 5. 1922, m. 1928, Wilson 

Bigler. Mary A.. M.D Top., China, S. 1930, dis. 1931 

Bills, Grace Ida N. W., India, a. 1906, m. 1909, SchiUz 

Bing, Anna V Cin., Japan, a. 1888. R. 1912, d. 1923 

Bishop, Beulah Des M., India, 5. 1930 

Bishop, Francene L Pac, India, a. 1916, m. 1918, Wood, d. 1921 

Bjorklund, Sigrid C N. E., China, S. 1920, det. 

Black. Gladys H Pac, Philippine Islands, S. 1925, r. 1935 

Black, Lillian A Phila., India, a. 1888, R. 1889 

Blackburn, Kate B N. W., Bulgaria, a. 1892. R. 1926, d. 1933 

Blackmar, Louisa Top., India, a. 1872, m. 1902, Gilder, d. 1928 

Blackmore, Sophia Minn., Malaysia, a. 1887, R. 1923 

Blackstock, Anna N. W., India, a. 1913* 

Blackstock, Constance E Phila., India, a. 1914*, r. 

Blackstock, Ella M Minn., Japan, a. 1889, R. 1913, d. 1916 

Blackstock, Isabella T Phila., India, a. 1905, m. 1913, Beardsley 

Blair, Katherine A Cin., India, a. 1888, R. 1927, d. 1935 

Blakely, Mildred M Top., Phihppine Islands, a. 1913 

Blasdell, Jennie A Cin., India, a. 1917 

Bliss, Lois E N. W., India, 5. 1929, r. 1932. m. 1933, Stephens 

Block, N. Bernita, M.D N. W.. Korea, 5. 1927 

Bobb, Mildred H Top., India, S. 1927, m. 1933, Paulsen 

Bobenhouse, Laura G Des M., India, a. 1897 

Boddy, Estie T Des M., China, a. 1907, m. 1921, Ware 

Boddy. Grace Top.. India, a., 1912, d. 1933 

Bodley, Ellison W Pac, Japan, a. 1915, r. 1927, m. Roche 

Boeye, Katherine B Des M., China, S. 1925 

Boggess. Edith E N. W., India, a. 1915, m. 1921 

Boggs, Lucinda N. W.. China, a. 1910, R. 1913 

Bohannon, Ida N. W., Mexico, a. 1900. R. 1908 

Boles, Lulu A Top., India, 5. 1923 

Bonafield, Julia Cin., China, a. 1888 

Bording, Maren P N. W., Philippine Islands, a. 1916, Korea, 5. 1922 

Borg, Jennie Top., China, a. 1907, m. 1915. Lawrence 

Bortell, Pearl Phila., South America, 5. 192 5, c. t., miss. 1929. r. 1931 

Boss. Harriet N. W., India, a. 1897, dis. 1898 

Bothwell, Jean B Top., India, 5. 1922 

Bowen, Alice Cin., China, 5. 1922, c. t., miss. 1925, r. 1932 

Bowen, Mary E N. E., South America, a. 1888, m. 1898, Brown 

Bowne, Ida May N. Y., Italy, a. 1897, m. 1903, Manfre, m. Perry 

Boyde, Mary L N. Y., India, 5. 1935 

Boyles, Helen E Cin., Korea, 5. 1926 



158 Directory of Missionaries 

Bradley. Edna I N. Y., India. 5. 1929 

Bragg, Jessie A Top., India, a. 1914 

Brayton, Margaret N. W.. China, 5. 1922. r. 1933 

Brethorst. Alice B Minn.. China, a. 1906. del. 

Brethorst. Helen G Minn.. India, a. 1915. m. 1919, Omond 

Brethorst, S. Marie Minn., China, a. 1913. 

Brewer, Edna C N.VV., India, a. 1913. jR. 1920 

Bricker. Mary E N. W.. India. 5. 1923 del. 

Bridenbaugh, Jennie B Des M., China, a. 1911, del. 

Bridgewater, Gertrude M Des M.. China, a. 1914. m. 1919, Robson 

Britt. Edythe M N. Y., India, a, 1914, m. 1918, Fellows 

Broadbrooks, Edith N. W., India, a. 1912, m. 1914, King 

Brooks, Jessie F Minn, and N. Y., Malaysia, a. 1907, R. 1928 

Brouse, Louise T N. W., India, a. 1899, m. 1905. Cook 

Brown, Cora M Top., China, a. 1910, del. 

Brown, Edna B N. Y.. South America. 5. 1920. R. 1927 

Brown. Maria N. E.. China, a. 1871. m. 1874, Davis 

Brown. Zula F Pac. China, a. 1911, R. 1933 

Brownlee, Charlotte Cin.. Korea, a. 1913 

Bryan, Mary E., M.D N. Y., India, a. 1891, R. 1897 

Buck, Lois M Cin., India, a. 1904*, d. 1907 

Budden, Annie M N. Y., India, a. 1880*, R. 1919, d. 1921 

Buel, Lora E N. W., Malaya, S. 1927. m. 1930, Peel 

Bugby, Mary Marguerite Cin., India, 5. 1920 

BuUis, Edith M N. W., Japan, a. 1905, r. 1915 

Bulow, Agnes Minn., India, a. 1913, d. 1914 

Bunce, Thirza E N. W., Malaysia, a. 1908 

Bunger, Frances Col. R., India, 5. 1922, R. 1929 

Burchard, Mary A., M.D N. Y., India, 5. 1934 

Burdeshaw, Rhoda A Cin., China, S. 1922 

Burman, Matilda C N. W., India, a. 1898, dis. 1903 

Burmeister, Elsie K Des M., Burma, a. 1914, m. 1919, Clare 

Burmeister, Margaret J Minn., japan, 5. 1926, r. 1935 

Burt, Edith N. W., Italy, a. 1906*. r. 1913. m. 

Burton. Mildred E., M.D N. E.. India, 5. 1934 

Bushnell. Kate C. M.D N. W., India, a. 1879, R. 1882 

Buss, Helen S N. W., India, 5. 1926 

Butcher, Annie N. Y., India, a. 1894, m. 1896, Hewes 

Butterfield. Nellie M Pac, Mexico, 5. 1922, R. 1930 

Butts, Ethel H Col. R., and N. Y., Korea, 5. 1920 

Buyers, Anna P Phila., India, 5. 1928 

Byler, Gertrude M Top., Japan, 5. 1927 

Calkins, Ethel M Top.. India, a. 1915 

Campbell, Eleanor Louise N. W., India, 5. 1931 

Campbell, Letitia A N. E., China, a. 1875, d. 1878 

Cans, Clara A Cin., China, a. 1914, S. 1926, del. 

Carleton, Mary E., M.D N. Y., China, a. 1887, d. 1927 

Carlyle, Elizabeth M Col. R., China, S. 1920 

Carncross, Flora M N. W., China, a. 1908, d. 1925 

Carpenter, Mary F Phila, India 5. 1923, c. t., miss. 1926 

Carr, Rachel C N. W., India, a. 1909, 

Carroll, Mary E N. W., India, o. 1888, d. 1897 

Carson, Anna N. W., Philippine Islands, a. 1913 

Carter, Fern N. W., India, .S. 1928 

Cartwright, Ida May Cin., India, a. 1903, d. 1904 

Carver, Margaret B Cin., India, a. 1898, m. Ernsberger, Pac. 5. 1927 

Cary, Mary F Phila., India, a. 1876, m. 1880, Davis, d. 1934 

Castle, Belle N. W., China, a. 1915, R. 1928 

Cavett, Maurine E Des M., Burma, .S. 1926 

Chadwick, Freda P Phila., Netherlands Indies, S. 1920 

Chaffin, Mrs. Anna B Des M., Korea, a. 1917 

Challis, Grace M N. W., India, .S. 1930 

Chalmers, Eleanor M N. E., India, a. 1916, r. 

Chapin, Jennie M N. E., South America, a. 1874, R. 1890. d. 1924 

Chappell. Mary H Cin., Japan, o. 1912*, r. 1927 

Charles, Bertha D Cin., Philippine Islands, a. 1912 

Charter, Mabel Top., India, a. 1913, d. 1917 

Chase, Bertha A., M.D N. E., India, S. 1928 

Chase, Laura N. E., Japan, a. 1915, c. /., miss. 1920 

Cheney, Alice Des M., Japan, a. 1914 

Cheney. Monona L N. W.. China, a. 1918. del. 

Chilson, Elma M Top., India, a. 1911 

Chisholm, Emma Mae Bait.. China, a. 1904, m. 1906, Brown 

Christensen, Christine N. Y., India, a. 1894, m. 1896, Ashe 

Christensen, Edith Julia N. W., Burma, 5. 1932 

Christensen, Lydia D Des M.. India, a. 1913 



Directory oj Missionaries 159 

Christiancy, Mary M., M.D N. E., India, a. 1884, R. 1891 

Church, Marie E Col. R., Korea, a. 1915 

Clancy, Kathleen N. W., India. S. 1932 

Clancy, M. Adelaide Pac, India, a. 1909, R. 1934 

Clark, Elsie G Bait., China, a. 1912, m. 1919. Krug 

Clark, Faith A N. W., India, 5. 1921 

Clark, Grace Col. R., Africa, a. 1911, Pac. 1925 

Clark, Jessie E N. W., India, a. 1918, m. 1925, Lasher 

Claussen, Minnie Top., South America, 5. 1925, Mexico, 5.1930, dis. 1931 , 

m. 1934, Tinker 

Cleary, Mary Cin., Japan 5. 1921, m. 1923, Hunter 

Clemens, Mrs. E. J N. W., South America, a. 1879. R. 1884 

Cliff. Minnie B N. W.. Malaysia, a. 1913, R. 1927 

Cline. Marie Ida Des M., India. 5. 1921. r. 1927 

Clinton, E. Lahuna Des M., India, a. 1910 

Clippinger. Frances Top., India, a. 1904, r. 1905, d. 1918 

Cochran, Ruth E N. W., India, a. 1912. r. 1925 

Cody. Mary A Minn., P. I. and Malaya, a. 1900, Cin., Japan, a. 1905, 

R. 1919 

Coffin, Sophia J N. Y., Africa, a. 1906. r. 1914 

Cole, Marion R N. Y., China, 5. 1925 

Collier, Clara J N. E., China, a. 1895, R. 1919 

Collins, Irma D Top., India, 5. 1925 

Collins, Mary D Phila.. Japan, S. 1928 

Collins, Susan Pac, Africa, a. 1901. R. 1922 

ColUns, Ruth H Des M.. India, a. 1894. m. 1899, Thoburn 

Colony. Lucile Des M.. India. S. 1922 

Combs, Lucinda, M.D Phila., China, a. 1873, m. 1878, Strillmater 

Comstock, Joy E Phila, India, 5. 1923 

Cone, Gertrude M Cin., China, 5. 1930 

Cone. Maud E Col. R., Africa, 5. 1923. r. 1926 

Conn, Cora Elbertha Minn., Malaysia, 5. 1920, m. 1926, Motz 

Connor, Lottie M N. W., China, a. 1912, m. 1916. Irwin 

Connor. Olive B Pac. India, a. 1911, d. 1912 

Conrow, Marian L Top., Korea. 5. 1922 

Cook. Celinda Phila.. Mexico, a. 1903, R. 1907 

Cook, Rosalie Phila., Mexico, a. 1903, R. 1907 

Copley, Ruth Elizabeth Top., Philippine Islands, a. 1918, Mexico5. 1925,r.l932 

Corbett, Lila M N. W.. Malaysia, 5. 1920 

Corey, Katherine, M.D N. W., China, a. 1884, m. 1888, Ford 

Cornelison, Bernice M Col. R., South America. S. 1922 

Corner. Sula Marie Col. R.. India, S. 1924 

Couch, Helen Phila., Japan, a. 1916 

Covington, Lottie V Cin., India, 5. 1926, R. 1926 

Cowan, Celia M Col. R., China. 5. 1920. 

Cox, Ruth M Top., India, 5. 1921 

Coy. Martha M Top., India, S. 1929 

Crabtree. Margarett M Cin., Philippine Islands, a. 1905, d. 1920 

Craig. Frances N. W., India, a. 1892. m. 1902, Smith 

Crandall, Jessie Ruth Pac, Malaysia. S. 1920, R. 1927 

Crandall, Violet B Pac, Africa, 5. 1929 

Crane, Edith M N. W., China, a. 1904. R. 1932 

Craven, Norma N. W.. Malaysia, a. 1917 

Crawford, Janette H Top., India, S. 1925 

Crawford, Mabel L Des M., Philippine Islands, o. 1907, m. 1909 Bowers 

Creek, Bertha M N. W.. India, a. 1905. China, 1916. R. 1929 

Crook, Winnie M N. E., China, a. 1916. r. 1923 

Crooks, Grace A N. W., China, a. 1904, m. 1912. Welzeon 

Cross, Cilicia L Minn.. Africa, a. 1913 

Crosthwaite, Isabella N. Y.. China, a. 1892. dis. 1893 

Croucher, Miranda N. E., China, a. 1895, m. 1903. Packard 

Crouse, Margaret D Phila.. India, a. 1906 

Crouse, Sara E. D Phila., India, o. 1913, m. Lawrence 

Crowell. Bessie F N. E., India, a. 1905. dis. 1912 

CuUey. Frances E N. Y.. China. 5. 1924 

Currier, Grace M Des M., France, 5. 1919, r. 1928 

Curry, Olive Phila., Japan. 5. 1925 

Curtice, Lois K N. E., Japan, a. 1914 

Curtis, Martha E Top., India. 5. 1925. r. 1932 

Curts. Kate O N. Y., India, a. 1895, d. 1908 

Cushman, Clara M N. E., China, a. 1878-1909, R. 1924. d. 1928 

Cutler. Mary M.. M.D N. Y.. Korea, a. 1892, R. 1935 

Daily. Rebecca N. W., India, a. 1890, R. 1897 

Dalrymple, Marion E N. E., India, a. 1918, R. 1933 

Danforth, Mary A N. E., Japan, a. 1888. R. 1893. d. 1911 

Daniel. Nell Margaret Des M.. Japan, a. 1897t 



160 Directory of Missionaries 

Daniels, Martha Phila., Mexico, 5. 1924, c. I., miss. 1926 

Daniels, Ruth Natalie Top., China, 5. 1920 

Danner. Ruth M : .N. W., China, a. 1917 

Danskin, Elsie M Top., China, 5. 1932 

Darby, Hawthorne, M.D N. W., Philippine Islands, 5. 1925, R. 1934 

Dart, Jennie M., M.D N. W., India, a. 1895, m. 1898, Dease, d. 1925 

Daubendiek, Letha I Des M., India, 5. 1923, del. 

Davis, Mrs. Anna L N. W., China, a. 1892. d. 1904 

Davis, Dora N. W., Bulgaria, a. 1900, R. 1926 

Davis, Grace C Cin., India, a. 1908 

Davis, Hazel N. W., Philippine Islands, .5. 1919 

Davis, Joan Des M., India, a. 1902, R. 1931 

Davis, Lois L Col. R., Japan, S. 1923. m. 1933, Htiber 

Davis, Mary Grace Bait., China, 5. 1926 

Davison, Mabel W N. Y., Japan, a. 1902*. m. 1907, Smart 

Dawson, M. Gayle N. Y., India. 5. 1935 

Day, Georgia E Des M., China, a. 1910. m. 1914, Robertson 

Day, Martha E Des M., India, a. 1888, m. 1895, Abbott 

Deam, Marv L N. W., Philippine Islands, 5. 1919 

Dean, Flora J Minn.. Malaysia, a. 1917. r. 1923. m. 1924, Bartlett 

Dean, Florence E N. Y., China. 5. 1920, m. 1922 Tebbutt 

Dearmont, Mrs. Ellen H N. W., Italy, S. 1928. r. 1929. 

Dease, Margaret E Bait., India, a. 1914*, J. 1923 

Deaver, Ida C Phila., China, a. 1896, m. 1897 

Deavitt. LaDona N. Y., China, a. 1903, m. 1907, Rosenberg 

Decker, Helen M N. VV., China, a. 1899, m. 1904, Beech 

Decker, Marguerite M Minn., Philippine Islands, a. 1905. Pac. 1908 

DeLine. Sarah M N. W.. India, a. 1884, R. 1895, d. 1928 

DeMott, Mary Des M.. Japan, a. 1891. m. 1892. Uoerini; 

Denning. Lou B N. W.. South America, o. 1873, R. 1890, d. 1910 

Dennis, Viola Bell« Cin., India, 5. 1919. m. 1934, Wintz 

Denny. Etta A Top.. China, 5. 1921, r. 1932 

Desjardins, Helen N. W., China, a. 1918 

DeVine. Esther J Cin., India, a. 1882. m. 1891, Williams 

Deyoe, Ella M Col. R., China, a. 1910. r. 1917 

Dicken, Ethel Mae Cin., Korea, 5. 1919, m. 1926, Fills 

Dickerson, Augusta Phila., Japan, o. 1888. R. 1925 

Dickinson. Emma E N. Y., Japan, a. 1897, s., d. 1926 

Dickinson, Jane M N. E., Malaysia, 5. 1920, r. 1926 

Diem, Lydia N. W., Bulgaria, a. 1893, m. 1911, WenzJ. d. 1911 

Dillenbeck, Nora M N. Y., China, o. 1913 

Dillingham, Grace L Pac, Korea, a. 1911 , del. 

Dimmitt, Marjorie A N. W., India, 5. 1920 

Dingle, Leila \^ Col. R., Philippine Islands, 5. 1928 

Dirksen. Mechteld D N. Y., Malava, S. 1927 

Dodd, Stella, M.D Des M., India, 5. 1921, % 

Doddridge. Eathel V Cin., Burma, 5. 1922, R. 1927 

Doltz, Henrietta Top., Philippine Islands, 5. 1931* 

Donahue, Julia M., M.D Cin., China, a. 1893. R. 1897 

Donahue. Katherine Mamie Phila., South America, 5. 1926 

Donohugh, Emma E Phila.. India. 5. 1919. r. 1929 

Dosch. Laura B Cin., India, a. 1909, d. 1912 

Dove, Agnes C. W Col. R., India, 5. 1920, Phila.. .S. 1925 

Downev, Clara A N. Y. India, a. 1884, R. 1894. d. 1896 

Doyle, Gladys B Top.. India, 5. 1925 

Doyle. Letah M Top., India, 5. 1926 

Draper, Frances L., M.D N. W., China, a. 1906, d. 1911 

Draper, Helen Des M.. India. 5. 1926. r. 1932 

Draper. Winifred F N. Y., Japan, a. 191 1* 

Dreibelbies, Caroline N. Y., China, a. 1899, R. 1906 

Dreisbach, Gertrude I Top., Philippine Islands, a. 1906, m. 1912, Baldwin 

Drescher, Mildred G N. W.. India, 5. 1920 

Drummer, Martha A Pac, Africa, a. 1906, R. 1926 

Dudley, Hannah India, a. 1890, R. 1891 

Dudley, Mrs. Ola Hawkins Des M., China, .S. 1928 

Dudley, Rose E Col. R., Philippine Islands, a. 1907, d. 1929 

Dunmore, Effa M Phila., Mexico, a. 1891, d. 1919 

Dunn, .'\gnes Dora Pac, India, 5. 1927 

Dunn. Olive N. W., India, 5. 1921 

Dunton. Dorothy K Cin.. India, .V. 1923, r. 1933 

Duryea, Grace Phila., Mexico. 5. 1921, c. t., miss. 1924. r. 1925 

Dutton, Mrs. May L Cin., India, a. 1911, r. 1914 

Dyer, Addie C Cin., Mexico, a. 1917, c. t.. miss. 1921 

Dyer. Clara Pearl N. E., China, a. 1907 

Easton, Celesta Pac, India, a. 1894-1906, R. 1922 

Easton, Sarah A Cin.. India, a. 1878, s., d. 1915 



Directory of Missionaries 161 

Eaton. Mary Jane Cin.. Italy, a. 1917, m. 1930, Blake 

Ebersole, Stella Minn.. Burma, S. 1921, Cin. 5. 1926 

Edborg, Vera M Minn., Netherlands Indies, 5. 1923, m., Ostrom S. 1933 

Eddy, Mabel L N. W., India, 5. 1902 

Eddy, Mrs. S. W Cin., India, a. 1902, R. 1926 

Edmeston, Rhoda C Phila., South .America, 5. 1929 

Edmonds. Agnes M., M.D Des M., China, a. 1901, R. 1921 

Edmunds. Margaret J Cin., Korea, a. 1902, m. 1908, Harrison 

Ehly, Emma L N. W., China, a. 1912, R. 1927. 5. 1930, r. 1931 

Eichenberger. Emma N. VV., China, o. 1910. r. 1919. d. 1933 

Eide, Mary Louise Des M.. China. S. 1920 

Ekey, Mary E Cin.. India, a. 1911. r. 1917 

Elicker. Anna R Des M., India, a. 1894, m. 1912. Guse 

Elliott, Bernice E N. W., India, o. 1914 

Elliott, Margaret Phila.. Mexico, a. 1879, m. 1883. Wilson 

Elliott. Martelle N. Y.. India, a. 1897. m. 1904. Datis 

Elliott. Mary E N. Y.. India, a. 1885. m. 1886. Stephens, d. 1893 

Elliott. Mary J Cin.. Japan, a. 1886, m. 1890. Armstrong 

Ellis. Ida Minn.. Malaysia, a. 1900. N. W. 1904. R. 1908, d. 1914 

Ellison, Grace F Top.. China, a. 1912. m. 1933. French 

Emery. Phoebe E Top.. India, a. 1916 

Emmel, Aetna L Col. R.. India. 5. 1919. m. 1922, Olson 

Engberg. Mrs. Lila Kehm Minn., India, 5. 1926, c.l., miss., 1929 

English. Fannie M N. Y., India, a. 1884. d. 1913 

English. Marguerite G N. E.. Korea. 5. 1921. r. 1930 

Eno. Enola Des M.. India, o. 1915. m. 1929. Forsgren 

Eno, Eula, M.D Des M., China. 5. 1922, r. 1929 

Erbst. VVilhelmina Minn.. Philippine Islands, o. 1909 

Ericson. Judith Top, India, a. 1906 

Ernsberger. Emma. M.D Cin.. Korea, a. 1899, R. 1920 

Ernsberger. I., M.D Cin.. India, a. 1888. R. 1900, d. 1930 

Ernsberger. Mrs. Margaret C. (see Carver) 

Estey. Ethel M N. Y.. Korea, a. 1900. d. 1929 

Evans. Alice A Des M.. India, a. 1895, R. 1925 

Evans, E. Florence Pac. China, 5. 1929 

Evans. Mary A N. E., Philippine Islands, a. 1913 

Eveland. Ruth Des M.. India, 5. 1925 

Everding, Emma J Bait.. Japan, a. 1883. d. 1892 

Everley, Garnet M Top., India. 5. 1924 

Ewers. Harriet C N. W.. India, a. 1899, m. 1900, Lyons 

Fales, Cora N. W., India, a. 1918 

Falstad, Constance Minn., China. 5. 1921. m. 1923. Brewer 

Farmer. Ida A N. Y.. India, a. 1917 

Fearon. Dora C Cin.. China, a. 1912 

Fearon. Josephine L Cin.. China, a. 1911. m. 1914. Winans 

Fshr. Helen E Cin.. India. 5. 1927. N. W.. 5. 1934 

Fehr. Vera J Cin.. Japan. 5. 1919 

Fenderich, Norma H Phila. India, a. 1903. R. 1914. m. Martin 

Feline. Maud Amy Clarissa N. Y.. India. S. 1929, m. 1931, Vaney 

Fernstrom. Helma J N. W., India. 5. 1925 

Ferris. Emma E Minn., Malaysia, a. 1892, Col. R., 1897, m. 1897, Shell. 

abear, d. 1923 

Ferris. Helen Pac. China. 5. 1923 

Ferris. Phoebe A.. M.D Col. R.. India, a. 1917, R. 1931 

Field. Nellie H N. E.. Mexico, a. 1887. R. 1888 

Field. Ruth Col. R., India, o. 1918 

Files. Estelle M N. Y.. India, a. 1888, R. 1916 

Filley. Georgia A., M.D N. W.. China, a. 1913, r. 1919 

Finch, Harriet N. E., India, a. 1911, m. Randall 

Fincham, Ella E N. W., Bulgaria, a. 1887, R. 1893 

Finlay, Annette Cin.. Philippine Islands. 5. 1920. d. 1929 

Finlay. L. Alice Cin.. Japan, a. 1905 

Fisher. Elizabeth Bait.. China, a. 1884, m. 1888, Brewster 

Fisher, Fannie F N. W., India, a. 1895, R. 1925, 5. 1925, R. 1927 

Fisher, Mrs. Mabel G N. W., India, a. 1917, R. 1927 

Flessel, Anna M N. Y., China. S. 1923, r. 1930 

Fonda. Edith L N. W.. China, a. 1908. m. 1911. Cole 

Foote. Rhetta C N. W., Malaya, 5. 1925. m. 1932. Schmucker 

Forbes, Ella R N. VV.. Japan, a. 1890, m. 1894. Phillips 

Foreman, Elizabeth J Bait, China, a. 1917, m. 1921, Lewis 

Forster. Miriam N. W.. India, a. 1898. m. 

Forsyth. Estella M N. W.. India, a. 1907 

Fosnot. Pearl Beatrice Top.. China, 5. 1921 

Foster, Carrie Des M.. India, a. 1902, R., d. 1935 

Foster. Ina Lee Phila, South America, 5. 1924, r. 1931 

Foster. Mary Eva Col. R., India, a. 1893. R. 1895, m. Brown 



162 Directory of Missionaries 



Foster, Mildred N. W., Italy, S. 1922, R. 1935 

Fox, Eulalia E N. W., China, a. 1913 

Frantz. Ida F Cin., China, a. 1914 

Frazey, H. Laura Top., China, a. 1908, d. 1932 

Fredericks, Anna Edith N. Y., China, a. 1915 

Frees, Mabel A Cin., North Africa, S. 1930, m. 1935, Warstler 

French, Anna S N. E., Japan, a. 1889, m. 1895, Freyer. d. 1914 

French, Clara M N. Y., China, 5. 193 1 

Fretts, Millicent Phila., Japan, a. 1911, r. 1917 

Frey, Cecelia M Cin., China, a. 1891, R. 1894, d. 1926 

Frey, Lulu E Cin., Korea, a. 1893, d. 192 1 

Frymoyer, Lucille Des M., Mexico. S. 1927, m. 1932, Davies 

Fuller, Edna H Pac. China, 5. 1924, R 1930 

Fuller, Delia A Top., India, a. 1886, d. 1901 

Fuller, Marjorie A N. W., Africa, S. 1920, det. 

Gable, Florence L N. W., China, 5. 1920, m. 1921, Alon 

Gabosch, Ruth N. W., China, 5. 1931 

Gabrielson, Winnie M Top., India, a., 1908 iKinsferred to Swedish Unil, 1935 

Galbreath, Elizabeth Cin., India, a. 1906, m. 1907 

Gallagher, Hannah C Cin., India, 5. 1932 

Galleher, Helen M Cin., China, .S. 1924 

Gallimore, Anna Bait., India, a. 1887, R. 1903 

Galloway, Helen R Des. M., China, a. 1894, i^. 1919,5. 1922, R. 1924, d. 1934 

Gard, Blanche A Top., Japan, 5. 1920, r. 1934 

Gardner, Minnie Top., Japan, a. 1908, m. Foster 

Gaylord, Edith F Des. M., China and Korea, a. 1913, R. 1934 

Geiser, Helen M Minn., South America, a. 1910, m. 1913, Mallough 

Gerrish, Ella M N. E., Japan, a. 1928. det. 

Gertsch, Martha Cin., Malaya, .V. 1935 

Gheer. Jean M N. Y., Japan, a. 1879, d. 1910 

Gibson, Clara A Phila., Mexico, S. 1929, c. t., miss. 1932. r. 1933 

Gibson. Eugenia N. Y., India, a. 1878. m. 1882. Mitchell 

Gifford, Etta Mary N. E.. Bulgaria, S. 1931, c. t., miss., 1933 

Gilchrist, Ella, M.D N. W., China, a. 1881, d. 1881 

Gill, Mrs. Mary W. (see Wilson) 

Gilliland. Helen C Pac, South America, a. 1918* det. 

Gilman, Gertrude N. E., China, a. 1896, R. 1929 

Gilmore, Erastine B N. E., Mexico, 5. 1920, r. 1925 

Gimson, Esther, M.D N. W., India.. a.l<)0S.m.l923, Bare, R. 1917. mAQlH, Rosier 

Givin, Olive I Phila., South America, S. 1931 

Gladden, Dora B Minn., Mexico, a. 1910, m. 1923, Carharl 

Glassburner, Mamie F Des M., China, a. 1904 

Glenk. Marguerite E.. N. Y , China, a. 1898, m. 1905, Burley, d. 1921 

Glidden, Zella M N. Y., Africa, .s'. 1935 

Gloss, Anna D., M.D N. W., China, a. 1885. R. 1924. -/. 1928 

Glover, Ella E N. E., China, a. 1892, R. 1925, d. 1929 

Godfrey. Annie Louise Col. R.. India, a. 1912, R. 1925 

Goetz, Adeline Minn., China, a. 1900, m. 1901, Guthrie 

Golisch, Anna Lulu Des M., China, a. 1908 

Gongwer, Margaret R Cin., Bulgaria, 5. 1926, c. t., miss. 1929, r. 1935 

Gooch, Mary Esther N. W., India, 5. 1920, m. 1922, Padrnk 

Goodall. Annie Des M., India, a. 1911, R. 1926 

Goodenough, Julia E N. E., South America, a. 1881 . m. 1886, Hudson 

Goodin, Elizabeth S Des M., South America a. 1895, R 1899, m. Hardy 

Gooding, Laura N. W., China, 5. 1923, m. 1930, Flood 

Goodman, Zora Phila., Japan, 5. 1924, m. 1927, Thompson 

Goodwin, Lora C N. W.. Japan, a. 1915, d. 1925 

Goucher, Elizabeth Bait., China, a. 1913, s.. m. 1921, Chapman 

Gould, Olive Laura Des M., India, 5. 1921, r. 1934 

Gourley, Ina, M.D Des M.. India. S. 1925, r. 1928 

Graf. Hedwig Cin.. Africa, a. 1909, r., d. 1919 

Graf, Martha A Cin., China, 5. 1922 

Grandstrand, Pauline Minn., India, a. 1905, R. 1934 

Gray, Frances N. ¥., China, a. 1912, m. 1923, Hayes, d. 1924 

Green, Lola M Top., India 5. 1930 

Greene, Leola Mae N. W., India, 5. 1920 

Greene, Lilv Dexter N. W., India, a. 1894 

Greene, Lucilla H., M.D N. E.. India, a. 1876. m. Cheney, d. 1878 

Greene. Nellie R N. E., China, a. 1886. R. 1890 

Greenwood. Ruth C Phila.. South America. .S". 1930, 

Greer, Lillian P Top., China, a. 1917, r. 1935 

Gregg. Eva A N W.. China, a. 1912. R. 1934 

Gregg, Marv E Des M., India, a. 1899, s., m. 1912, Wilson 

Grennan, Elizabeth N. W., Philippine Islands, 5. 1921, c. t., miss. 1925, 

r. 1932 
Grey, Ruth Cin., India, 5. 1930*, m. 1934, Garland 



Directory of Missionaries 163 

Griffin, Alta Irene N. W.. India, 5. 1921 

Griffin, Helen F Col. R., China. S. 1929, m. 1930. Burn 

Griffin, Martha A N. W., India, a. 1912, d. 1925 

Griffin, Pansy Pearl Phila., China, 5. 1920 

Griffiths, Mary B Des M., Japan, a. 1888, R. 1916, 5. 1920. R. 1925 

Grove. Mrs. H. L. R N. W.. India, a. 1905, s.. R. 1912 

Grove, Nelda L Top., Korea, S. 1919, r. 1932 

Gruenewald, Cornelia H. A Des M.. India, a. 1912, R. 1919 

Guelfi, Cecilia N. W., South America, a. 1878, d. 1886 

Gugin, Irene P N. Y., Africa, 5. 1931 

Guthapfel, Minerva L Phila., Korea, a. 1903, R. 1912 

Haberman, Margaret O N. W., Japan, 5. 1920, r. 1922, India. 5. 1926, r. 1934 

Hadden. G. Evelyn Pac, India, a. 1913. 

Haenig, Hulda A N. W.. Korea, a. 1910, r. 1922, d. 1927 

Haffner, Freda, M.D Pac, India, .S'. 1935 

Hagar, Esther May N. Y., South America, S. 1925. r. 1930 

Hagen, Olive Irene N. W.. Japan. 5. 1919 

Hale. Lillian G N. E.. China, a. 1888, m. 1894. Scott, m. Welday 

Halfpenny. M. Lillian Pac, China, a. 1914, d. 1929 

Hall, Ada Bearl Cin., Korea, 5. 1921 

Hall, Dorcas Phila., India, 5. 1922 

Hall, E. Baylie Pac, China, a. 1913, m. 1915. Sceats 

Hall. Emma M N. Y.. Italy, a. 1885, N. W.. 1886, R. 190o 

Hall. Mrs. Rosetta S., M.D. (See Sherwood) 

Hallagan. Bess N. W.. South America, S. 1933 

Hallman, Sarah B Bait., Korea, a. 1907, m. 1912, Beck 

Halverstadt, Harriet J Top., China, a. 1918 

Hamisfar. Florence N.. M.D N. W.. Japan, a. 1883. dis. 1886 

Hammond. Alice J.| N. Y.. Korea a. 1900 m. 1903. Sharp. S. 1908 

Hammond. Rebecca J Cin., South America, o. 1892, R. 1899 

Hammons, Mabel, M.D Top., China, S. 1921, r. 1932 

Hampton, Mary S N. Y.. Japan, a. 1881, R. 1917. d. 1930 

Hancock, Mrs. Nellie D Bait., India, S. 1920, r. 1932 

Haney, Ida C N. E.. India, a. 1912. r. 1919 

Hanks, E. Gertrude Phila., South America, S. 1920 

Hannah, Marv Louise N. E., India, 5. 1924 

Hansing, Ovidia N. W., China. S. 1920 

Harb. Mabel E N. W.. Malaysia. 5. 1924, m. 1932. Kuehn 

Hardie. Eva M Cin.. India, a. 1895 

Hardsaw, Rosa A Top., India, 5. 1922, r. 1934 

Harger, Gladys B N. W., China, 5. 1919 

Harmon, Grace N. W.. Korea, a. 1911. m. 1914, McCary 

Harrington, Susan Col. R., China, a. 1892, m. 1893, Causland, d. 1920 

Harrington, Sylvia Rhoda N. Y., Korea, a. 1918, r. 1921 

Harris, Alice C N. E., India, 5. 1920, r. 1929 

Harris, Lillian. M.D Cin., Korea, a. 1897. d. 1902 

Harris, Mary W Cin., Korea, a. 1891, m. 1894, Folwell 

Harris. Nellie M Cin.. India, a. 1893. R. 1895 

Harrod, Anna M N. W.. India. 5. 1919 

Hart. Mary Ames Pac. India, a. 1904, m. 1907, Briggs 

Hartford, Mabel C N. E. China, a. 1887, R. 1929 

Hartung, Lois Joy Pac, South America, a. 1911, Mex. 1924, R. 1934 

Harvey, Emily L N. E., India, a. 1884, R. 1920, d. 1929 

Harvey, Ruth M Minn., Malaysia, 5. 1923 

Hasler, Abbie C N. W., India. 5. 1922. m. 1924. Thomas 

Hastings. Mary N. Y., Mexico, a. 1874, d. 1898 

Hatch, Ella Des M., South America, a. 1915, r. 1919 

Hatch, Hazel A Top., Korea, 5. 1920, r. 1932 

Hatfield. Lena. M.D N. W., China, a. 1907, r. 1918, d. 1927 

Hawkins, Sallie C Top., Philippine Islands, 5. 1921, r. 1934 

Hayes, Virginia Cin., South America, S. 1923, Philippine Is., 5. 1930 

Haynes. Emily Irene N. Y., Korea, a. 1906 

Heafer. Louise Phila.. India, a. 1891. R. 1907 

Heath. Frances J.. M.D N. Y.. China, a. 1913. jti. 1929, Htighson 

Heaton, Carrie A N. W., Japan, a. 1893, R. 1929 

Hebinger, Josephine N. W., India, a. 1892, m. 1894, Snitggs 

Hedrick, M. C N. Y.. India, a. 1884, m. 1890. Miles 

Hefty. Lura M Col. R., China, a. 1909, r. 1922, m. 1923, Wire 

Heist, Laura A Col. R., India, 5. 1921 

Helm, Mabel Cin., Mexico, 5. 1924, m. 1930, Singleton 

Hemenway, Ruth V., M.D N. Y., China, 5. 1923 

Hemingway, Edith A N. E., India, a. 1898, r. 1909 

Henderson. Lucile Cin.. Mexico. 5. 1919. m. 1920 

Hendrick. Rhoda G., M.D N. W.. India. S. 1923, r. 1925 

Henkle, W. Nianette Des M.. India, a. 1901, R. 1912, d. 1929 

Henry, Mary Top., India, a. 1904, dis. 1906 



164 Directory of Missionaries 



Henschen, A. Lillian Pac, India, a. 1914, m. 1917, Hollister, d. 1933 

Hepperly, Hattie H Top.. India, 5. 1921, m. 1923, Dewey 

Hermiston, Margaret I. W N. E. India, 5. 1919 

Hess, Margaret I Cin., Korea, a. 1913 

Hess, Stella A Cin., Africa, a. 1914. det. 

Hewett, Ella J Phila., Japan, a. 1884, R. 1919, d. 1927 

Hewett, Lizzie N. VV., South America, a. 1886, R. 1914 

Hewitt, Helen M N. W., Mexico, a. 1904, R. 1919. 5. 1926, R. 1934 

Hewson, Marguerite E Col. R., Philippine Islands. 5. 1922 

Higgins. Susan B N. E. Japan, a. 1878, d. 1879 

Highbaugh, Irma Top., China, a. 1917 

Hill, Clara M N. E., Mexico, 5. 1921. c. L, miss. 1923, r. 

Hill, Katherine Ledyard Phila.. India, a. 1905, R. 1915 

Hillman. Amanda. M.D N. W., Korea, a. 1911, 5., r. 1914 

Hillman, Mary R Cin., Korea, a. 1900, d. 1928 

Hilts, Abigail M N. Y., South America, a. 1911, r. 1915 

Hilts, Carrie A N. Y., South America, a. 191 1, r. 1919, d. 1927 

Hitch, Alice E N. W., Japan, a. 1918, r. 1921, w. 1923, Armstrong 

Hitchcock, Frances H Des M., China, a. 1905, m. 1908, Richer, d. 1916 

Hoag, Lucy, M.D N. Y., China, a. 1872. d. 1909 

Heath, Ruth Top., India, a. 1916 

Hobart. Elizabeth N. W., China, a. 1915* 

Hobart, Louise N. W., China, a. 1912*. d. 1934 

Hoddinott, Lucerne Cin., China, 5. 1921, m. 1927, Knowlton 

Hodge, Emma, M.D Phila., India, a. 1895, m. 1899, Worrall 

Hoffman, Carlotta E N. W., India, a. 1906 

Hoffman. Cora E Phila., China, 5. 1928, m. 1932, Johnson 

Hoffman, Thekla A Cin., India, 5. 1924 

Hoffmann, Jeanette ; . . . N. Y., Mexico, S. 1929 

Hoge, Elizabeth Cin., India, a. 1892. R. 1935 

Holbrook, Ella M Pac, Japan, a. 1900, R. 1906 

Holbrook, Mary J Cin., Japan, a. 1878, m. 1890, Chappell. d. 1912 

Holder, Mary Edna Col. R.. India, 5. 1922 

Holland, Mrs. Alma H Des M., India, a. 1904 

Holland. Ary J Top.. Malaysia, a. 1905. R. 1919 

Holland, Harriet A N. W., India, a. 1906, ?n. 1909. Milholland 

Hollister, Alice E N. W., India, a. 1909, m. 1913, Gabel 

Hollister. Grace A Cin., Mexico, a. 1905 

Hollows, Bessie A N. E., China, S. 1922 

Holman, Charlotte T Pac. India, a. 1900 

Holman, Sarah C Minn.. India, a. 1914, s. 

Holmberg, Hilda Minn., Malaysia, a. 1913. m. 1922, Allsirom 

Holmes, Ada Col. R., India, a. 1905. R. 1924 

Holmes, Lillian L N. Y., China, a. 1911 

Holmes, Maybel Marion N. Y., China, 5. 1931 

Holway, Ruth N. E., South America, 5. 1924, m. 1930, Bosworth 

Honnell, Grace L Top., India, 5. 1920 

Honsinger, Welthy B N. Y., China, a. 1906, r. 1921, m. 1924, Fisher 

Hopkins, Rhoda Mae Col. R., Japan, a. 1917, R. 1918 

Hosford. Ruby C Top., South America, a. 1918, r. 1934, 

Hostetter, Flossie M Cin., China, a. 1913, r. 

Householder, C. Ethel Top. China, a. 1913, r. 1934 

Howard, Leonora, M.D N. W., China, a. 1877. m. 1884. King 

Howard, Meta. M.D N. W., Korea, a. 1887, R. 1890 

Howe, Deha A Phila., China, a. 1879. R. 1882 

Howe. Gertrude N. W.. China, o. 1872, R. 1917, d. 1929 

Howey, Harriet M Cin., Japan, o. 1916 

Hoy, Ellen I Cin., India, a. 1881, m. 1884, Lawson 

Hu, May L Des. M., China, a. 1904, nt. 1922. Ung 

Hu. King Eng. M.D Phila., China, a. 1895, R. 1929, d. 1929 

Huelster, Luella Minn., China, a. 1908, m. 1912, Bishop 

Huff. Edyth A Des M.. India. 5. 1920. r. 1927, m. 1931, Beats 

Huffman, Loal E., M.D Cin., India, a. 1911 

Hugoboom, Marion Phila., Mexico, a. 1883, m. 1884 

Hughes, Jennie V N. Y.. China, a. 1905, r. 1920 

Hughes, Mary A N. Y., India, a. 1887, R. 1890. m. Ernsberger, d. 1899 

Hughes, M. Pearl N. W., India, 5. 1923 

Huibregtse, Minnie Des M., India, 5. 1931 

Hulbert, Esther L Cin.. Korea, S. 1923 

Hulbert. Jeannette C Cin., Korea, a. 1914 

Hunt. Ava F N. W.. India, a. 1910 

Hunt, Faith A Minn., China, a. 1914, r. 1932 

Hunt, Maud Edna N. W., India, a. 1918, m. 1921, Rogers 

Hunter, Alice Cin., Korea, 5. 1926. det. 

Hurlbut. Floy Top., China, a. 1913, r. 1931 

Huser, Minnie E Cin., China, .S. 1923, m. 1927, Ledbeatler 



Directory of Missionaries 165 

Hutchens, Edna May N. W.. India, S. 1921 

Hyde, Flora A N. W., China, a. 1912. m. Dedrich 

Hyde. Laura, M.D N. Y.. India, a. 1883. m. 1886. Foole 

Hvde. Minnie Z N. W., South America, a. 1888, m. 1894, IFj7so« 

Hyde, Nettie M Des M., India, a. 1897, to. 1907, Fell 

Hyneman. Ruth E Cin.. India, a. 1915 

Illingworth, Charlotte J Phila.. Burma, a. 1898. R. 1925 

Imhof. Louisa Top.. Japan, a. 1889. R. 1924. d. 1925 

Ingram. Helen Minn., India, a. 1898, s., r. 1913 

Irwin, Alice A Cin., South America, 5. 1923. r. 1933 

Isham, Ida G Pac. India, a. 1912, r. 1919 

Jackson. C. Ethel N. W.. Malaysia, a. 1902 

Jacobson, Evelyn R Minn., India. 5. 1922. m. 1931, Bream 

Jakobson. Alma Minn.. India, a. 1894, m. 1904, Kevenler, d. 1918 

James, Phoebe Top., Burma, a. 1906. r. 1926 

Jaquet, Myra A N. W.. China, a. 1909 

Jayne, Ruth E Pac. China. 5. 1924. R. 1933 

Jenkins. Mary E Top., India, .S. 1921, R. 1923 

Jewell, Amy L N. Y.. Malaysia, S. 1924, m. 1928. Procter 

Jewell, Carrie I Cin., China, a. 1884, R. 1913, d. 1919 

Jewell, Mrs. Charlotte M N. Y.. China, a. 1883, R. 1929 

Johanson. Maria A. J Top.. India, a. 1915, r. 

Johnson, Anna N. W., a. 1894, R. 

Johnson, Eda Lydia. D.O Pac. China, a. 1918, R. 1934 

Johnson, Ella Phila., China, a. 1888, m. 1893, Kinnear 

Johnson. Frances E Pac, India, 5. 1931 

Johnson, Ingle A Top., Africa. 5. 1927 

Johnson. Juliet M Des M.. China, 5. 1928, m. 1934. Gamble 

Johnson. Katherine M Bait., Mexico, a. 1912, r. 1931 • 

Johnson, Mary A Minn., China, S. 1925, r. 1935 

Johnston, Ruth H Cin., Malaya, 5. 1926, r. 1933 

Jones. Dorothy N. W.. China, a. 1903 

Jones, Edna Bait., China, a. 1907 

Jones, Joan Comber N. Y., India. 5. 1920, m. 1930, Collins 

Jones, Jennie D Des M., China, a. 1911 

Jones. Laura E., M.D N. Y.. China, 5. 1919, r. 1931 

Jonte, Louise M Top., India, 5. 1922, d. 1926 

Jordan. Ella E N. W., China, a. 1911, R. 1925 

Justin, Catherine L Top., India, S. 1923 

Kahn, Ida, M.D N. W., China, a. 1896, d. 1931 

Kaulbach. Anna L N. Y., Japan, a. 1886. m 1889, Wilson 

Keckman. Anna N. E., China, a. 1916, to. 1918, Weigel 

Keeler, Anna C Cin.. India, a. 1892. to. 1899, Mawson 

Keeney. Dorothea L N. Y., China, 5. 1920, r. 1935 

Kehm, Alta Minn., India, S. 1924, m. 1928. Harris 

Keister, Ida M Minn., China, 5. 1922. m. 1927, Mader 

Kelley, Luella Bait.. India, a. 1880. dis. 1885 

Kellogg. Nora Evelyn N. W.. China, 5. 1921, d. 1932 

Kemper Harriet Des M., India, o. 1891, R. 1895 

Kennard, Ada Marie Pac. India, S. 1924 

Kennard, Olive E Pac, India, a. 1914, R. 1934 

Kennedy. Mary E Des M.. India, o. 1891. to. 1894, Core 

Kenyon. Carrie C Phila., Malaysia, a. 1917 

Kerr, Harriet Phila., India, a. 1881. i. 1886 

Kesler, Mary G Top.. China, a. 1912 

Kessing, Mae G N. VV.. So. .America. 5. 1928, del. 

Ketchum. Edith L Des M.. Japan, a. 1911. r. 1919 

Ketring, Mary. M.D Cin.. China and Philippine Islands, a. 1888-1905 India 

.S 1922. R 1928 

Keyhoe, Katherine Des M., India, 5. 1925 

Kidwell, Lola M Cin., Japan, a. 1894, R. 1918 

Kilburn, Elizabeth H Phila., Japan. S. 1919 

King, Charlotte N. W., Burma. .S. 1919. to. 1925. Price 

King, F. Grace Cin., India, o. 1916*, m, 1920, Nelson 

King, Winifred E Pac, India. S. 1922. R. 1934 

King. Sarah N Pac. Africa, S. 1923 

Kintner. Lela L Cin., Burma, S. 1922, c. t., miss. 1923 

Kinzly. Katherine M N. Y., India, 5. 1924 

Kipp. Cora I., M.D N. W.. India, o. 1910 

Kipp. Julia I N. W.. India, o. 1906 d. 1931 

Kirkpatrick. Reba Agnes N. W.. India, a. 1918, d. 1919 

Kissack. Sadie E Bait.. China, a. 1893, m. 1896, McCartney 

Kleiner, Clara E Des M., India, 5. 1927 

Kleinhenn, Florence E Cin., Malava, 5. 1924. c.<.. miss.\92').m.l93S,Kesselring 

Kline, Blanche May Phila.. India, a. 1917, r. 1924, m. 1925. bakir 

Klinefelter, Mary A Pac. Philippine Islands. 5. 1922, d. 1926 



166 Directory of Missionaries 

Klinseberuer. Ida M Top., India, 5. 1924 

Knapp, Elsie L N. VV., China, a. 1912, del. 

Kneeland. Bertha N.E., So. America, a. 1900. m. 1909, TaHon, 191,?, R. 1919 

Knit;ht, Florence Pac, Mexico, .S. 192.S, r. 1928 

Knowles, Emma L N. E., India, a. 1881, R. 1917, d. 1924 

Knowles, Grace M Des M.. India. '^. 1920, d. 1925 

Knox, Emma M N. W.. China, o. 1906 

Koether, Liiella G Des M., China, 5. 1931 

Koons, Sue L., M.D Phila., China, a. 1904, r. 1910 

Kostrup. Bertha Alfrida N W., Philippine Islands, a. 1916, Korea, 5. 1922 

Krill. Beredene Cin., Bulgaria, V. 1928, r. 1935 

Krook, Mrs. Ruby L N. W., Korea, a. 1913, r. 1914 

Kurtz, Alice W Phila.. Mexico, a. 1902, dis. 1903 

Kyle, Theresa J Phila., India, a. 1885, R. 1913, d. 1928 

Kyser, Kathrvn B N. Y., Mexico, a. 1911, r. 1924 

Lacy, Alice M Cin., China, o. 1917*. d. 1921 

Laird, Esther Cin.. Korea, S. 1926 

Lake. Virginia S Phila., Malaya, 5. 1930 

Lamb, Emma L N. W., India, a. 1896, dis. 1901 

Landis, Rotha S N. Y.. China. 5. 1926, R. 1934 

Landrum, Margaret N. W.. India, a. 1909 

Lane, Ortha May Des M.. China, 5. 1919 

Lang, Victoria C N. VV., .Africa. 5. 1927 

Lantz, Viola. M.D Pac, China, 5. 1920 

Larson, H. Ruth Top.. India, 5. 1928, m. 1935, Hollisler 

Larsson, Marie E Top., China, a. 1911. r. 1926 

Latimer, H. Isabel N. Y., South .America, 5. 1930 

Latimer, Laura M N. E., Me.xico, a. 1884, R. 1888. d. 1924 

Lauck, Ada J Des M., India, a. 1892 

Lauck, Sarah Phila., India, a. 1885, m. 1888, Parson 

Lauderdale. Grace Top., Mexico. ^., 1928 

Lawrence, Birdice E N. W., China, a. 1917 

Lawrence, Mabel C N. W.. India, a. 1914 

Lawson. Anne E Des M., India, a. 1885, R. 1931 

Lawson. Christina H N. Y.. India, a. 1892. R. 1925 

Lawson, Ellen L Cin., India, a. 1917*, R. 1935 

Laybourne, Ethel M.. M.D N. W., India, a. 1911, c. /., miss. 1920, det. 

Layton, M. E Bait.. India, a 1878. d. 1892 

Leadbeater, A. Evelyn. M.D N. Y., Korea, S. 1928 

Leavitt, Ollie R Top., India, 5. 1932 

Lebeus, J. E Martha Cin., China, a. 1897, R. 1929 

Lee, Edna M Top., Japan, a. 1913, r. 1927 

Lee. Elizabeth M Phila.. Japan, a. 1914, R. 

Lee, Irene E N. E., Japan, a. 1894, m. 1901. Ver Meht 

Lee, Mabel Minn., Japan, a. 1903 

Lee, Mary H N. W., India, a 1914, r. 1917 

Leffonje, Roxy N. W.. China, a. 1918t 

LeHuray, Eleanor N. Y., South America, a. 1884, R. 1913 

Lemin'J, Sarah F Cin., India, a. 1873. m.l875. Shepherd, m- Dunn 

Lenlz, Grace Z Pac. China, 5. 1920, m. 1934, Keller 

Leslie, Grace E N. Y.. China, S. 1923, r. 1931 

Lewis. Amy G Bait.. Japan, o. 1898, /?. 1911, (i. 1934 

Lewis, Ella A Bait., Korea, a. 1891, r. 1904 

Lewis, Ida Belle Des M., China, a. 1910, m. 1932, Main 

Lewis, Margaret D., M.D N. W., India, a. 1901, R. 1930, .S. 1931. d. 1934 

Li, Bi Cu, M.D N. Y., China, a. 1905 

Liers, Josephine Des M.. India, a. 1907 

Lilly. May B Col. R.. Malaysia, a. 1897, R. 1916 

Limber .;er. Anna R Phila., Mexico, a. 1890, d. 1910 

Linam, Alice N. Y.. China, a. 1895, R. 1929 

Lind, Jennv Phila., China, S 1926, c. t., miss. 1928 

Lindblad, Anna C N. E., China, a. 1908. R. 1929 

Livermore, Melva A Top., India, a. 1897 

Llewellyn, Alice A Phila., Italv, a. 1901, s., r. 1919, </. 1927 

Lochhead, G. Christian Phila., France, S. 1922, c. I., miss. 1925. m. 1931, Annas 

Logeman, Minnie N. W.. India, a. 1905. m. 1910, Linn 

Loland, Serene N. E., China, .S. 1921. r. 1924 

Long. Hortense N. Y.. Japan, a. 1905*. m. 1911. Harrison 

Longstreet, Isabella D N. W., China, a. 1898, m. 1910, Evesione 

Loomis, Jean Pac, China, a. 1912, R. 1926, d. 1928 

Loper, Ida Grace N. Y.. India, a. 1898 

Lore, Julia A.. M.D N. Y.. India, a. 1874*, m. 1876. McGrew 

Lorenz, Frieda V Minn.. China, a. 1904, m. 1910, Spamer 

Lorenz, Theresa Top., India, s. 1926 

Lossing, Mabel Des M., India, a. 1904. m. 1911, Jones 

Loucks, Blanche Helen N. W., China, a. 1917 



Directory of Missionaries 167 

Lovejoy, Bervl H Too., Soulh America, a. 1914, m. 1920. Hurd 

Loveless, Emilia R N. Y.. N. Africa, a. 1919 

Low. Nellie Ciii.. ladia, (i. 1913 

Lowe, Mary Louise Pac, China, S . 1929 

Lov. Netella Tor>-, So. Amer. and Mexico, a. 1914. m. 1924. Hin-thaw 

Loyd. Mary De F Piiila.. Mexico, a. 1884, d. 1902 

Luce. R. Isabel Pac, China, 5. 1925, R. 1933 

Ludgate, Abbie M N. W., India, .S. 1919, r. 1928, .S. 1929. det. 

Lund, Pearl B Phila., Korea, S. 1929 

Lunn. Mary V Cin., Mexico, S. 1922. m. 1924, Rodgers 

Lybarger, Lela Cin., China, a. 1909, d. 1934 

Lyon. Ellen M.. M.D N. W.. China, a. 1890. d. 1919 

Mabuce. Ethel L Des M., Burma, a. 1916. m. 1923. Solberg 

Mace. Rose Alice Bait.. China, a. 1911 

Maclntire. Frances W N. E.. Japan, a. 1916. r. 1929 

Madden, F. E. Pearl Phila., India, a. 1916, R. 1933 

Maddock, Lois G N. Y.. China, 5. 1920, m. 1923, Luccock 

Maltby, Christine Top., Mexico, 5. 1923 

Malvin, Elizabeth Cin., South America, a. 1914, m. 1918, Coales 

Manchester. Ruth C N. E., India, 5. 1919 

Manderson, Mabel Melissa. M.D N. W., China, a. 1907, m. 1923, Durbin 

Manly, Grace E Cin., China, S. 1924* 

Manly, Marian E., M.D Cin., China, 5. 1925* 

Mann, Mary N. W., China, a. 1911 

Manning, Ella Des M., China, a. 1899, R. 1930 

Mansell. Hester V Cin., India, a. 1884*. m. 1889. Monroe 

Marble. Elizabeth Dana Pac, India, a. 1904, R. 1907 

Marker, Jessie B Cin., Korea, a. 1905 

Marks, Inez M Pac. China, a. 1916. m. 1922. Londermilk 

Marks. Lillian R Pac. India, a. 1894, m. 1903. Kelley, d. 1929 

Marriott, Jessie A N. E., China, a. 1901 

Marsh, Jessie L N. VV., South America, a. 1906, R. 

Marsh, Mabel C Top., Malaysia, a. 1910, Mexico S. 1925, Malaya, 5.1926 

Marshall, Eva T N. E., N. Africa, 5. 1930, m. 1931. Douglas 

Martin. Clara Minn.. Malaysia, a. 1897, d. 1929 

Martin, Elizabeth E N. W., China, a. 1900, R. 1908 

Martin, Emma E.. M.D N. W., China, a. 1900, R. 1927 

Marvin, Elizabeth Pac, China, a. 1915, R. 1919. d. 1925 

Maskell. Florence W Des M.. India, a. 1898, R. 1925. 5. 1925. R. 1927 

Mason. Florence Pearl Cin.. China, a. 1917 

Mason, Hazel A Top., Mexico, 5. 1920, m. Croivle 

Mason, Inez D N. E., India, a. 1915, r. 1929 

Mason, Letitia, M.D N. W., China, a. 1873, Cin. 1874, m. 1876, Qiiine, d. 1903 

Masters, Florence F Des M., India, 5. 1924 

Masters. Luella. M.D N. W.. China, o. 1892-1910, R. 1913 

Matthew, Helen N. W., India, .S. 1924, del. 

Maull, Alice P Des M., Phihppine Islands, S. 1924, r. 1931 

Maxey, Elizabeth N. Y., India, a. 1888, R. 1919, d. 1924 

May, Pauline N. W., Japan, 5. 1922, m. 1925, West 

Mayer, Lucile C N. Y., India, a. 1912, r. 1931 

McAllister, Hazel Top., Mexico, 5. 1929 

McBee, Alice M Cin., China, S. 1921, r. 1926 

McBee, Edith F Cin., China, S. 1926 

McBurnie, Susan Phila., India, a. 1888, m. 1894, Bond 

McCaig, E. Fern Top., China, 5. 1929 

McCann, S. Elizabeth Bait., India, 5. 1924, m. 1927. Mueller 

McCartney. Blanche L Top.. India, n. 1916 

McClellan. Alice M Phila.. Burma, a. 1915, r. 1922 

McClintock, Ethel L Pac, Mexico, a. 1918, r. 1925 

McClurg, Grace K Cin., China, a. 1912, r. 1926 

McCutchen, Martha L Top.. China, 5. 1919 

McDade, Mvra L Bait., China, 5. 1919, c. t., miss. 1924 

McDonnell, Clella E Minn., China, a. 1912, m. 1915, Brown 

McDowell, Jessie N. W., Japan, a. 1912, m. 1912, Gillham 

McDowell, .Kate, M.D Phila., India, a. 1886, R. 1891 

McGregor, Katherine. M.D N. W.. India, a. 1893. m. 1895. Boomer 

McHose, Lottie Cin., China, a. 1904, R. 

McKesson, Mary N. W., India, a. 1883, m. 1886, Conkling 

McKibben, Martha L Des M., Mexico, a. 1900, d. 1900 

McKinley, Mary B N. W., India, a. 1899, m. 1906, Younqlove 

McKinney, Alice N. Y. and Phila., So. America, a. 1907, m. 1912, Slebbini 

Mc Knight, Isabel Top., India, a. 1901, R. 1933 

McMann, Marv Ethel Cin., Africa, 5. 1922, m. 1931, Henrv 

McMillan, Carrie N. Y., India, a. 1871, m. 1872, Buck, d. 1932 

McMillan, Helen K Top., India, 5. 1920, m. 1927, Middlebrook 

McMurray, Sarah Top.. Mexico, 5. 1922, m. 1923. Jimenez 



168 Directory of Missionaries 



McQuie. Ada N. W., Korea, S. 1922 

Meader, Frances S N. W., China, 5. 1924, m. 1933, Way 

Means, Alice Cin., India, a. 1897 

Means, Mary Cin., India, a. 1896, d. 1926 

Meek, Grace Anna Minn., China, a. 1911, dis. 1915 

Meek, Mrs. Mary C N. Y., Malaysia, a. 1899, R. 1906 

Meeker, Bessie L Top., China, S. 1919 

Mekkelson, Josephine Des M., Africa, a. 1900, d. 1902 

Mellinger, Roxanna Cin., Burma, o. 1913 

Melton, Mary E N. W., Japan, a. 1897, d. 1916 

Merrill, Clara E N. W., China, a. 1896. R. 1932 

Merritt, Edna F N. Y., China, 5. 1924 

Merrow. Luella, M.D N. W.. China, a. 1917. r. 1918 

Messersmith, Marie N. Y., Malaya, 5. 1930, m. 1932, Gurr 

Metsker, Mary Kathryn Des M., India. S. 1923 

Meyer. Fannie E Des M., China, a. 1894, dis. 1899 

Michel. Mabel P N. W., Africa. 5. 1929 

Michener, Emma Phila.. Africa, a. 1880, d. 1881 

Miller, Alpha J Cin., Africa, S. 1924 

Miller, Anna E Des M., India, a. 1915. m. 1919. Cook 

Miller, Ethel Phila., Korea, a. 1917 

Miller, Etta Phila., Japan, a. 1917. m. 1922, Weavers 

Miller, Geneva E Des M.. China. S. 1932 

Miller, Iva M., M.D Col. R., China, a. 1909, del. 

Miller, Lula A N. Y., Korea, a. 1901 

Miller, Marie Cin., Korea, S. 1922, m. 1923, Kipp 

Miller, Martha J Des M., India, a. 1900, m. 1904, Jones 

Miller, Oriel Cin., India, a. 1886, dis. 1889 

Miller. Sara H N. E., Korea, a. 1901, R. 1903 

Miller. Viola Lue N. W., China, 5. 1920 

Milligau, Grace H Phila., France, 5. 1919, m. 1921. Carnahan 

Mills, Camilla Col. R., China. 5. 1922*. m. 1931, Biiigersiaff 

Mills, Harriet M N. W., India, a. 1911. w. 1918 

Minear, Ruth Des M., South America, S. 1927, r. 1934 

Mitchell, Emma L N. Y., China, a. 1888, R. 1906 

Mitzner, Amanda Pac, Burma ,5. 1932 

MonelU', Nancy, M.D N. Y., India, a. 1873, m. 1874, Mansell 

Montgomery, Urdell Top., India, a. 1902 

Moore, Agnes Stephens N. Y.. Africa, 6". 1922, m. 1927, Tull 

Moore. Alice M N. E., Mexico, a. 1900, r. 1903 

Moore, Blanche Cin., India, a. 1914, d. 1917 

Moore, Marv Gladys De3 M., Burma, 5. 1920 

Moots, Mrs. Cornelia N. W.. Philippine Islands, a. 1900, R. 1902. d. 1929 

Morehouse, Edith T., M.D N. Y., India, 5. 192 1. r. 1931 

Morgan, Cora L Top., India, a. 1904. m. 1930, Oldham 

Morgan, Julia E., M.D Phila., China, .S. 1922 

Morgan, Mabel N. W., India, 5. 1918, c. t., miss. 1924 

Morgan, Margaret N. W., India, a. 1910 

Morris, Harriett Plummer Top., Korea, 5. 1921 

Morris. Mrs. Louise Ogilvy N. Y., Korea, 5. 1927 

Morrow, Julia E Col. R., India, a. 1913 

Moses, Mathilde R Top., India, a. 1916 

Moss, Loma R Cin., India, 5. 1923, m. 1929, Loose 

Moyer, Jennie E N. Y., India, a. 1899, R. 1927 

Mudge, Ada N. E., India, a. 1904*, R. 1909 

Muir, Winifred N. W., China, a. 1909, r. 

Mulliner, Clara N. Y., Mexico, a. 1878, R. 1883, d. 1918 

Munson, Kezia E N. W., India, a. 1918, c. I., miss., 1925 

Murphy, May Col. R. and Phila., South America, S. 1922 

Murray, Helen Grace Phila.. Mexico. 5. 1919, So. America, 1924, Mexico. 1926, 

R. 1935 

Myers, Ruth L N. W., China, 5. 1922, m. 1929, Allen 

Nagler, Etha M N. W.. China, 5. 1920 

Narbeth, E. Gwendoline Phila., N. Africa. 5. 1922 

Navlor, Nell F Top., India, a. 1912 

Neiger, Lillian N. W.. Me.fico. a. 1892. R. 1895 

Nelson, Ada M N. W., India, 5. 1925 

Nelson, Caroline C Top.. India, a. 1906 

Nelson, Dora L N. W., India, a. 1910 

Nelson, Eva I Minn., Malaysia, a. 1916, del. 

Nelson, E. Lavinia Top., India, a. 1906 

Nelson, Lena Phila.. China, a. 1911 

Nelson. Marie N. E.. Africa. S. 1923 

Newman, Emma E N. W., India. 5. 1925, m. 1930, Taylor 

Nevitt, Jane Ellen Bait., China, a. 1912 

Newby, Alta Des M., China, a. 1905, m. 1912, Webster 



Directory of Missionaries 169 

Newton, Marion N. W., India, a. 1898. m. 1902 

Newton. Minnie E N. Y., India, a. 1912 

Nichols. Florence L N. E., India, a. 1894. R. 1909, 5. 1921, R. 1927 

Nicholls, Elizabeth W N. Y., India, a. 1896, iR. 1924 

Nickerson, Florence Cin.. India, a. 1880, d. 1887 

Nicolaisen. Martha C. W Minn., China, a. 1900, R. 1927 

Norberg, Eugenia N. W., India, a. 1907 

Nordyke. Lela E N. VV.. China, 5. 1920, d. 1927 

Northcott, Ruth E N. W., Africa, 5. 1924 

Northrup, Alice M N. W., India, a. 1903*, m. 1910. Brooks 

Norton. Anna J.. M.D Cin.. India, a. 1900, R. 1905, d. 1926 

Nourse, Emma D N. W., Africa, a. 1909, m. 1921, Theron 

Nowlin, Mabel Ruth Des M., China, a. 1915 1 

Nunan, Nellie F., M.D N. E., India, a. 1913. dis. 1916 

Nuzum. Ruth P N. E.. China. 5. 1921, m. 1928, McConnell 

Odee. Bertha Top.. Philippine Islands. S. 192 1 

Odgers.Evaline A N. W.. Italy, a. 1900, R. 1908 

Oelschlager. Lydia N. W.. Netherlands Indies. S. 1924, m. 1933, Alm,S. 1933 

Ogborn, Kate L Des M., China, a. 1891. d. 1932 

Ogden. Henrietta C Cin., Mexico, a. 1876. R. 1889. d. 1899 

Okey, Mary C N. W.. India. S. 1924. del. 

Older. Mildred Des M., India. 5. 1925, d. 1932 

Oldfather, Jeannette Des M., Korea, 5. 1923, det. 

Oldridge, Mary B Cin., Japan, 5. 1919, del. 

Oldroyd, Roxanna H Top., India, a. 1909 

Olson, Delia N. W., Malaysia, a. 1917 

Olson, Elizabeth Minn., Malaysia, a. 1915, R. 1922 

Olson, Emma N. W., Malaya, 5. 1932 

Olson. Mary E Minn.. Malaysia, a. 1903 

Orcutt. Hazel A Cin.. Burma, a. 1912. m. 1921, Hayden 

Organ. Clara M N. E.. India, a. 1900. R. 1916 

Osburn. Carolyn B Pac, India, 5. 1928, m. 1930, Mondol 

Ostrom, Eva Top., N. Africa, 5. 1927 

Ostrom, Mrs. Vera E. (See Edborg) 

Otto. Alice M Des M.. Japan, a. 1894, m. 1900, Selby 

Otto, Violet L Top., India, 5. 1923. m. 1932, Wilson 

Ovenshire, Laura B N. Y., India, 5. 1922, d. 1925 

Overholt. Treva B N. W., South America, 5. 1929 

Overman, L. Belle N. W., Korea, a. 1917 

Packer, Josephine R Des M., South America, 5. 1922, r. 1928 

Paige, Ina N. E.. Mexico. 5. 1922, r. 1929 

Paine, Josephine O Phila., Korea, a. 1892, d. 1909 

Paine, Mildred A Cin., Japan, S. 1920, N. Y., 5. 1923 

Pak, Mrs. Esther K., M.D Phila., Korea, a. 1900. d. 1910 

Palm. Emma Cin., China, 5. 1922 

Palmer. Ethel M Pac, India, 5. 1921 

Palmer, Florence K N. W., India, S. 1930 

Palmer. Pearl E N. Y., India, 5. 1927 

Pardee, Mary E Phila., Japan, a. 1888, d. 1893 

Parish, Sarah Rebecca, M.D N. W., Philippine Islands, a. 1906, R. 1935 

Parker, Theda A N. Y., Mexico, a. 1889, R. 1894 

Parkes. Elizabeth Pac, Philippine Islands, a. 1903, d. 1928 

Parkinson, Phoebe A Col. R., China, a. 1899, m. 1909, Upper 

Parks. Vera E N. VV.. India, 5. 1922 

Parmenter, Ona M Minn., Africa, S. 1920 

Parsons. L. Maud Phila., China, .S. 1930 

Patterson, Anna Gail Cin., India, S. 1920 

Patterson, June B N. W.. China, 5. 1921, m. 1922. Kerr 

Payne, Ella E Phila.. Mexico, a. 1904. R. 1910 

Payne. Zola L N. W., Korea, 5. 1929 

Payton, Lela E Pac, India, a. 1916. m. 1921, Tucker 

Pearson. Mary N N. E.. Mexico. S. 1920 

Peckham. Caroline S N. W.. Japan, a. 1915 

Peet. Azalia E N. Y., Japan, a. 1916 

Peirce. Ruth Cin., China, 5. 1921. m. 1924, Sleininger 

Penner, Eva N Minn., India, 5. 1928, r. 1933 

Penney, Oril A Pac, Africa, 5. 1926 

Penney, Winnogene C Top.. China, a. 1916. South America. 5. 1927, r. 1934 

Perkins, Fannie A Des M., Burma, o. 1890, R. 1924, d. 1933 

Perrill, M. Louise Top.. India, a. 1910 

Perrine. Florence N. W.. India, a. 1888. m. 1894, Mansell 

Perry, Edith Top., Bulgaria, 5. 1923, m. Morgan 

Perry, Ella L N. Y., India, S. 1931 

Perry, Fern E Top., Bulgaria, 5. 1923, d. 1926 

Perry, Harriet Louise N. E., Japan. S. 1922, ad. 

Persson. Bertha Top.. China. 5. 1920, r. 1929 



170 Directory of Missionaries 

Peters, AUce N. W., China, a. 1906, d. 1911 

Peters, Jessie I N. VV., India, a. 1903 

Peters, Mary N. W., China, a. 1894, R. 1926 

Peters, Sarah N. W , China, a. 1888, R. 1926 

Pfaff, Jessie A Minn., Africa, 5. 1929 

Phelps. Frances E Des M , lapan, a. 1889, m. 1915, Tackaberry. rf.l923 

Phillips, Bess L Cin., Africa, 5. 1924 

Pider, Mvrtle Z Top., Japan a. 191 1 

Pierce, Mildred L Des M., India, 5. 1922 

Pierce, Nellie Phila., Korea, a. 1897, m. 1905, Miller 

Pierce, Thirza M N. W.. China, a. 1902, R. 1908 

Pittman. Annie M N. Y., China, 5. 1919 

Place, Pauline .A N. W., Japan, a. 1916 

Pletcher. Mina L Cin., Philippine Islands, S. 1923, m. 1929, Rodenizer 

Plumb Florence J N. Y.. China, a. 1900* 

Poinier, Louise N. W., Korea, S. 1928, m. 1932, Faus 

Pond, Mrs. Eleanor J., M.D Bait., Philippine Islands, a. 1911, China 1919, d 1925 

Pool, Lvdia S Des M., India, a. 1903 

Pool, Miriam, M.D Top.. China, S. 1924 m. 1927, Huff 

Poole, Carrie M N. E., Japan, a. 1914, m. 1918, Keedy 

Porter, Anna D Top., Italy, a. 1913, m. 1919, Giambarresi 

Porter, Charlotte J N. W., India, a. 1896, m. 1901 

Porter, Clara A Top., India, o. 1912, r. 1927 

Porter, Eunice Top., India, a. 1913 

Porter, Mary Q Des M., China, a. 1871. m. 1882, Gamewill d. 1907 

Powell, Alice M N. Y., China, a. 1906 

Power, E. Marie Top., India, .S. 1926, m. 1929, Spear 

Power, Elsie May Top.. Burma, ."?. 1919 

Pray, Susan, M.D N. Y., China, a. 1886, R. 1887, d. 1903 

Precise, Myrtle Top., India. S. 1922 

Precise, Pearl E Top., India, 5. 1922 

Prentice, Margaret May Top., China, 5. 1924 

Preston, C Grace N. Y., Japan, a. 1912, r. 1918 

Priest, Marv A N. Y., Japan, a. 1878. R. 1880 

Proctor, Orvia A Des M., China, .S. 1919 

Proud, Vivian L Cin., China, 5. 1926, m. 1933, Cameron 

Pugh, Ada E Minn., Malaysia, a. 1906 

Pultz, Elizabeth M N. Y., India, a. 1872. R. 1877, d. 1889 

Purdv. Carrie M Phila., Mexico, a. 1895, So.America. 5. 1923. Mexico.5. 

1926. R 19.30 

Pye, Olive F N. Y., Korea, a. 1911, r. 1931 

Pyke. Edith N. W., China, a. 1916*, m. Thompson 

Pyke, Mildred N. W., China, a. 1912*, m. Mooney 

Pyne, Rosa M Des M., India, a. 1902, m. 1906, Berry, m. 1918. 

Hawthorne 

Quinton, Frances N. W., Africa, a. 1916 

Quirin, Flora Des M., India, 5. 1929 

Raabe, Rosa M Des M., Korea, a. 1915, r. 1919 

Radley, Vena I N. Y., China, 5. 1925 

Rahe, Cora L N. W., China, a. 1912 

Ramsev, Bertha E Phila., Africa, 5. 1924 

Randall. S. Edith Top., India, a. 1911 

Rank, Minnie L Minn., Malaysia, a. 1906 

Ransom, Ruth Phila., South America, 5. 1919. r. 1934 

Rasmussen, Mrs. Helen E N. Y., Africa, a. 1900, m. 1905. Springer 

Rea, Caroline Lois Cin., Malaysia. .S. 1922 

Rebstock, Thelma A N. Y., India, 5. 1929, r. 1935 

Reddick, Olive Irene Phila., India, .S. 1921, r. 1933 

Redinger, June E Phila., Netherlands Indies, 5. 1928 

Reed, Mary Cin., India, a. 1884 

Reeves, Cora D N. W., China, a. 1917t 

Reeves, Mrs. Florence G N. Y., Bulgaria, 5. 1923, Italy, S. 1931, Bulgaria, 1935 

Reid, Jennie Phila., South America, a. 1913 

Reid, Mabel J Des M., Burma, 5. 1924 

Reik, Elsie H N. W., China. 5. 1922 

Reilly, Marnie B N. W.. India, a. 1913, m. 1916, Hill 

Reiman, Frieda N. W., China, a. 1918 

Reitz, Beulah H Top., Africa, 5. 1922 

Rexrode, Sadie M Cin., Africa, a. 1917, d. 1921 

Rexroth, Elizabeth Cin., India, a. 1912, r. 1919 

Rexroth, Emma K Col. R., India, a. 1916 

Reynolds, Elsie M Des M., India, a. 1906. r. 1931 

Richards, Emily Cin., India, 5. 1925, m. 1929, Notley 

Richards, Gertrude E Phila., India, a. 1917 

Richardson, Faithe Top.. India, 5. 1925 

Richardson. Fanny E Minn., Malaysia, a. 1918, r. 1925 



Directory of Missionaries 171 

Richey, Elizabeth H Cin.. China, 5. 1919 

Richmond, Mary A Top., India, a. 1909 

Riechers, Bertha L Pac, China, a. 1915, r. 1934 

Rigbv, Luella G Des M., Burma, o. 1900, m. 1909, Jone!^ 

Rigg. Bessie E Des M., India, S. 1925, d. 1935 

Riste, Rose A.. M.D Col. R., India, 5. 1922, R. 1929 

Robbins, Adis N. W.. India, S. 1930 

Robbins, Emma E., M.D Top., China, a. 1911, r. 1927 

Robbins, Henrietta P N. Y., Korea, a. 1902 

Roberds, Frances E Bait., North Africa. S. 1931 

Roberts, Elizabeth S Minn., Korea, a. 1917, transferred to Swedish Unit, 1931 

Robinett. Gusta N. W., China, S. 1930 

Robinson, Alvina Des M.. Burma, a. 1907, r. 1928 

Robinson, Faye H N. E.. China, a. 1917 

Robinson, Flora L Minn., India, a. 1909*, m. 1921, Howells, d. 1926 

Robinson, Helen E N. Y.. India, a. 1902*. d. 1917 

Robinson, Martha E Phila., N. Africa, .S. 1922 

Robinson, Mary C N. W., China, a. 1884, d. 1906 

Robinson, Muriel E Cin., India, a. 1914*, r. 1931 

Robinson, Ruth E Bait., India, a. 1900* 

Rockey, Lois Cin., India, a. 1912*, m. 1921, Atkins 

Rockwell, Lillie M Bait., India. S. 1919, r. 1935 

Rodgers, Anna M Phila., Mexico, a. 1889, m. 1890, Furness 

Rogers, Hazel T Des M., India, 5. 1919 

Rogers, Mayme Marie Cin., Korea, S. 1921 

Rohde, Eleanora C N. W., Netherlands Indies. 5. 1921, R. 1934 

Rosenberger, Elma T Cin., Korea, 5. 1921 

Ross, Elsie M Phila., India, a. 1909 

Rossiter, Henrietta B Des M., China, a. 1917 

Rost, Carrie H Top.. India, 5. 1926 

Rothweiler, Louisa C Cin., Korea, a. 1887, R. 1899, d. 1921 

Rouse, Willma H Minn., China, a. 1893, m. 1905, Keene, d. 1929 

Roush. Hannah Elsie N. W., Africa, a. 1911. m. 1924. Bush 

Rowe, Phoebe N. W., India, a. 1881, d. 1898 

Rowley, Marv L N. W., China, a. 1899. m. 1904, Wilson 

Royce, Edith M Des M.. Korea. S. 1920. det. 

Rovce, Marian D Cin., Malaysia, S. 1924, N. Y., 5. 1931 

Royer, Mary Ann N. W., China, a. 1913, r. 1922, tn. 

Rubright, Caroline B Phila., South America, a. 1913. R. 1928 

Ruddick, EHzabeth May N. E., India, a. 1901. d. 1915 

Ruese, Mrs. Artele B Bait., Italy, a. 1918 

Ruggles, Ethel E Des M.. India, a. 1916 

Rulofson, Gazelle M N. E., Japan, a. 1886, m. 1888, Thomson 

Ruppel, Leona E Des M., India, 5. 1919. det. 

Russell, Elizabeth Cin., Japan, a. 1879, R. 1919, d. 1928 

Russell, Esther A Top., Mexico, S. 1922. d. 1923 

Russell, Marv K N.W., China, 5. 1930 

Russell, M. Helen Pac, Japan, a. 1895-1907, R. 1931 

Ruth. E. Naomi Phila. and N. W., Netherlands Indies, a. 1911, m. 

1924. Shellabear 

Sadler. Eva Phila, Malaya, 5. 1928 c. t., miss. 1929 

Salmans, Edith Pac, Mexico, a. 1910, r. 

Salmon, Bessie C N. W., Korea, a. 1915, R. 1923 

Salmon. Lena L N. W., Philippine Islands, a. 1910, m. 1915, Carrothen 

Salzer, Florence Minn., India. 5. 1920, c. /., miss. 1923 

Samson, Carrie J Des M., India, o. 1899, m. 1903, Sunder, d. 1921 

Santee, Helen C Phila., Japan, a. 1908, R. 1914 

Sauer, Clara N. W., China, a. 1915, r. 1919 

Savage, Eugenia M Col. R., China, 5. 1931 

Saxe, Agnes E N. Y., India, a. 1904. R. 1913, d. 1915 

Sayles, Florence A Col. R., China, a. 1914 

Schaefer, Carolyn E Minn., India, 5. 1925 

Scharpff, Hanna N.W., Korea, a. 1910, transferred to Central Europe Uni. 

Schaum, Lvdia L., M.D Top., China, .S. 1920, det. 

Scheldt, Ellen A Top., Philippine Islands, 5. 1920, r. 

Scheirich, A. Beta Cin., China, S. 1922, r. 1935 

Schenck, Linna N. W., Bulgaria, a. 1884, R. 1892, d. 1898 

Scherich, Rilla Top., China, 5. 1923, r. 1932 

Schlaefli, Trudy M Cin., China, 5. 1930 

Schlater, Irma Pac. India. 5. 1931 

. Schleman, Laura M Cin., China, 6'. 1930, c. I., miss. 1935 

Schlemmer. Hildegarde M N. W.. India, S. 1924, det. 

Scholberg, Miriam R N. Y., India, S. 1931* 

Schoonmaker, Dora E N. W., Japan, a. 1874, m. 1878, Soper, d. 1935 

Schreckengast, Joy R Top., South America, a. 1917, m. 1922, Jones 

Schroeppel, Marguerite E Des M.. India, a. 1913, m. 1923. Jones 



172 Directory of Missionaries 



Scott, Emma, M.D Cin., India, a. 1896, R. 1922 

Scott, Frances A Cin., India, a. 1889, R. 1921 

Scovill, Ila M Cin., Africa. 5. 1925 

Scranton, Mrs. M. F N. Y., Korea, a. 1885, d. 1909 

Seal, May Belle Cin., Mexico, 5. 1922 

Search, Blanche T Phila.. China, a. 1914 

Sears. Anna B Cin.. China, a. 1880, d. 1895 

Secor, Valeria Des M., India, a. 1909, m. Crandall 

Seeck. Margaret Top., China, a. 1917 

Seeds, Leonora H Cin.. Japan, a. 1890. R. 1934 

Seeds. Mabel K N. W.. Japan, a. 1902, R. 1914. d. 1924 

Seidlmann. Paula Cin., China, a. 1908. in. 1924, Spoerri 

Sellers, Rue A Cin., India, a. 1889. R. 1929. d. 1930 

Sheafer. Olga P Cin., Korea, a. 1910, m. 1914, Lomprey 

Shannon. Mary E Top., Burma, a. 1909. India, 5. 1925 

Sharp, Mrs. Alice H. (see Hammond) 

Sharpe, Mary Western, Africa, a. 1879. dis. 1883 

Shaw. AHce Fawcett N. Y., India, a. 1910, d. 1911 

Shaw. Ella C N. W.. China, a. 1887. d. 1933 

Shawhan, Grace B Top.. China, 5. 1923 

Sheldon. Mabel Marie Top.. India. 5. 1927 

Sheldon. Martha A., M.D N. E., India, a. 1888. d. 1912 

Shepherd. Elsie N. W., Mexico, 5. 1928, c. t., miss. 1933 

Sherwood, Rosetta, M.D N. Y., Korea, a. 1890. m. 1892, Hall, S. 1897, R 1935 

Shields, Wilhelmina N. W., Africa, S. 1930* 

Shiveley, Mirtha E Cin., Malaya, 5. 1926. del. 

Shockley. Marv E Cin., China, a. 1895. m. 1904, Drake 

Shoemaker, Esther, M.D Phila.. India, 5. 1927 

Shoub. Hazel M N. W.. China, a. 1917, m. 1922, Brown, d. 1925 

Shufelt, Edith E Minn., China. 5. 1921, r. 1928 

Shute, Vivian L Minn., India, a. 1915, m. 1920, Thompson 

Sia, Mabel Des M., China, a. 1902, d. 1903 

Sia, Ruby Des M., China, a. 1904 

Siberts, Sara Miriam N. W., South America, 5. 1920. m. 1920, Morley, d. 1921 

Siddall. Adelaide N. E., India, a. 1903. r. 1904 

Simester, Mary N. E.. China, a. 1905, d. 1913 

Simonds, Mildred Des M., India, a. 1906 

Simons, Marian G N. W.. Japan, S. 1930 

Simons. Maude E Bait.. Japan, a. 1889, d. 1898 

Simpson, Cora E N. W., China, a. 19071 

Simpson. Mabel E Top., India. 5. 1920. r. 1934 

Singer. Florence E Phila., Japan, a. 1893. R. 1914 

Singh, Lilavati N. W.. India, a. 1900, d. 1909 

Sinkey. Fern M Cin., China, 5. 1921, del. 

Sites. Ruth M Bait., China, a. 1890*, m. 1895. Brown 

Slate, Anna Blanche Phila., Japan, a. 1901, r. 

Smith. Ada Cin.. Korea. 5. 1921. r. 

Smith, Adeline N. W.. China, a. 1907, i?. 1910 

Smith, Alice N. Y., China, S. 1921. m. 1924, Duff 

Smith, Alice L N. Y., China, S. 1924. R. 1934 

Smith. Clara B Phila., China, a. 1914 

Smith, Ellen E Top., China, S. 1922 

Smith. Eloise G Top., Korea, S. 1930* 

Smith. Emily Cin.. N. Africa, a. 1910, R. 1935 

Smith. Eunice E N. Y.. China. 5. 1935 

Smith. Grace Pepper Pac, India, S. 1919 

Smith, Jennie Mabel Col. R., India, a. 1915 

Smith. Joy L Des M., China, o. 1918 

Smith. Lida B N. Y., Japan, a. 1885, R. 1912, d. 1926 

Smith, Madorah E Minn.. China, a 1911, r. 1920 

Smith, Mvrtle A N. W., China, S. 1921 

Smith, Pauline H Top.. Japan, 5. 1930*. m. 1934, Mc.Alpine 

Smith, Ruth B Minn.. China, a. 1910. m. 1912. Foster 

Smith. Sadie May Pac, Burma, 5. 1921, R. 1935 

Snapp, Reba N. Y., Japan, a. 1913, m. 1914 .Ryder 

Snavely. Gertrude E Phila., Korea, a. 1906 

Snider, Myrtle M Pac. India, a. 1921. r. 1926 

Snow. Myra N. W.. China. .S\ 1928, c. t., miss.. Col. R., 5. 1935 

Snvder. Chestora, M.D Cin., China, a. 1912. m. 1915. Hoffman 

Soderstrom, Anna N. Y., India, a. 1891, r. 1901 

Soper, E. Maud Phila., Japan, a. 1903*, R. 1911 

Soner. Laura DeWitt Top., India, a. 1917. r. 1932. m. 1934. James 

Southard. Ada J Des M.. Japan, a. 1900, r.l905 

Sparkes, Fannie J N. Y.. India, a. 1870, R. 1891, d. 1919 

Sparr, Julia, M.D N. W., China, a. 1878. m. 1883, Coffin 

Spathelf. Rena F N. W., China, S. 1925, d. 1931 



Directory of Missionaries 173 



Spaulding, Winifred Top., Philippine Islands, a. 1903-1910, Mexico 1917, R. 

1923 

Spear, Katherine A Phila., India, a. 1896, m. 1900, Collier 

Speer, Dorothy Bait., India, S. 1929 

Spence, Mattie B N. W., India, a. 1880, m. 1883, Perrie 

Spencer, Clarissa H Phila., Japan, a. 1896, r. 1901, d. 1927 

Spencer, Matilda A Phila., Japan, a. 1878, R. 1920, d. 1933 

Sprowles, Alberta B Phila., Japan, a. 1906 

Sprunger, Eva F Pac, China, 5. 1919, del. 

Stahl, C. Josephine N. W., India, a. 1892, R. 1932, d. 1934 

Stahl, Minta M Cin., China, 5. 1919, c. t., miss. 1923 

Stahl, Ruth L Cin., China, a. 1917t 

Stahl, Tirzah M Cin., China, S. 1921, del. 

Stallard, Eleanor B Pac, India, 5. 1924 

Stanton, Alice M N. Y., China, a. 1892, m. 1899, Woodruff 

Starkey, Bertha F Cin., Japan, a. 1910, Korea, -S. 1925 

Staubli, Frieda Cin., China, 5. 1922 

Stearns, Mary P N. E., India, a. 1899, m. 1903, Badley 

Steere, Anna E N. \V., China, a. 1889, R., d. 1914 

Stefanski, Pauline Top., Netherlands Indies, a. 1912, m. 1917, Worlhington 

Stephens, Grace Bait., India, a. 1892, R. 1919 

Stephens, Vida W Pac, India, a. 1910*, m. 1913, Bateman 

Sterling, Florence Minn., India, a. 1895, m. 1897, Lenth, i. 1900 

Stevenson, Ida M., M.D Top., China, a. 1890, R. 

Stewart, Emma N. W., India, 5. 1927 

Stewart, Mrs. Mary S., M.D Phila., Korea, a. 1910, r. 

Stixrud, Louise Minn., Philippine Islands, a. 1906, r. 1919, d. 1927 

Stockwell, Emma Top., India, a. 1901, m. 1904, Price 

Stockwell, Grace L Des M., Burma, a. 1901 

Stone, Anna Minn.. China, a. 1904, ./. 1906 

Stone, Mabel C N. W., China, a. 1913, r. 1917, m. Farley 

Stone, Mary, M.D Des M., China, a. 1896, r. 1920 

Stone, Myrtle M N. Y.. China, 5. 1922. r. 1931 

Stouffer. Edith J Phila., Burma, S. 1922, m. 1930, While 

Stout, Winifred N. W., China, a. 1906, m. 1913, Patterson 

Stover, Myrta O Cin., Korea, 5. 1925 

Stowe, Genevieve G Col. R., Malaya, 5. 1927, m. 1930, Jenkins 

Stov, Ellen Louise N. W., Italy, 5. 1919, r. 1923 

Strawick, Gertrude N. W., China, a. 1906, R. 1930 

Strever, Frances Top., South America. 5. 1922, d. 1931 

Strow, Elizabeth M N. Y., China, a. 1904, R. 1925 

Stryker, Minnie, M.D Phila., China, a. 1908, R. 1931 

Studlev, Ellen M N. W., China, 5. 1924 

Stump'f, Susanna M Des M., India, a. 1902, d. 1907 

Sturtevant, Abby L Minn., Japan, 5. 1921, r. 1932 

Suffern, Ellen H N. W., China, a. 1917, Pac, .S. 1924 

Suhr, Laura J Top., India, 5. 1921, d. 1929 

Sullivan, Lucy W Cin., India, a. 1888. R. 1923 

Sutherland. May E Top., India, a. 1915 

Sutton, Daisy B Cin., Japan, a. 1908, m. 1910, Miller 

Sutton, Marianne Minn., Malaysia, a. 1907, R. 1913 

Swain, Clara A., M.D N. E., India, a. 1869, R. 1896, d. 1910 

Swan, Beulah M N. W.. India, 5. 1923 

Swan, Hilda Top., India, a. 1904, R. 1928 

Swaney, Mary F Bait., Mexico, a. 1878, Top., South America, a, 1890, 

R. 1912, d. 1924 

Swank, Lottie Agnes N. W., Philippine Islands, 5. 1920, m. 1921, Gotlschal 

Swearer, Mrs. Lillian M N. Y., Korea, a. 1917 

Sweet, Mary B Top., Italy, a. 1912, r. 1919 

Sweet, Mary Edith Des M., India, a. 1917, det. 

Swift. Edith T N. E., Italy, a. 1902, R. 1914 

Swormstedt, Virginia R Cin., Africa, a. 1903, m. 1907, Coffin 

Taft, Gertrude, M.D Pac, China, a. 1895, 5., R. 1924 

Tang, Ilien Minn., China, a. l90o, d. 1920 

Taylor, Anna Mabel N. Y., Mexico, a. 191 », r. 1935 

Taylor, Erma M Phila., Japan, a. 1913, Des M., 5. 1926 

Taylor, Mabel Col. R., China, S. 1922, m. 1929, Triol 

Teague, Carolyn M Cin., Japan, a. 1912 

Temple, Laura N. Y., Mexico, a. 1903 

Terrell, Linnie Cin., India, a. 1908, r. 

Terry, Edna G., M.D N. E., China, a. 1887, d. 1913 

Thoburn, Isabella Cin., India, a. 1869, d. 1901 

Thoburn, Isabella Phila., India, 5. 1927 

Thoburn, Mrs. Ruth C. (see Collinsi 

Thomas, Ethel E Top., Mexico, 5. 1919 

Thomas, Hettie A Cin., Japan, a. 1903, d. 1920 



1 74 Directory of Missionaries 

Thomas. J. Edna Cin., Philippine Islands, a. 1Q14, d. 1918 

Thomas, Mary M Cin., China, a. 1904, R. 1929 

Thomas, Ruth F N. W., Africa, a. 1917 

Thomasson, Leona B Bait., China, 5. 1920, c t., miss. 1932 

Thompson, Anna Phila., India, a. 1889, m. 189,S, Stephens, d. 1932 

Thompson, Anna Armenia Top., Philippine Islands, S. 1920 

Thompson, Ethel Truesdale N. Y., China, .V. 1921, R. 1932 

Thompson, Flora Minn., Philippine Islands, a. 1916, r. 1917 

Thompson, May Bel Top., China, a. 1915 

Thompson, Vera R Bait., India, a. 1913, R. 1923 

Thurston, Esther V N. E., Japan, 5. 1920. to. 1927, Slosser 

Tinslev, Jennie M N. W., India, a. 1871, m. 1876, WaHs.h, d. 1928 

Tippett, Mrs. Susan Bait., China, a. 1901, R. 1909, d. 1929 

Tirsgaard, Maren M Minn., India, 5. 1924, N. W., 5. 1927 

Todd, Althea M N. E., China, a. 1895 

Todd, Grace L N. W., China, a. 1897, R. 1898, d. 1909 

Toll, Kate Evalvn N. W., India, a. 1904, d. 1930 

Tower, Rita B., M.D N. W., India, S. 1922 

Townsend, Mollie E N. Y., China, 5. 1921, c. t., miss. 1928 

Tracy, Alethea W N. Y., China, a. 1908, m. 1912, Gill 

Traeger. Gazelle Top., Malaysia, S. 1922 

Trask, Sigourney, M.D N. Y., China, a. 1874, to. 1885. Cowles 

Travis, Grace B N. Y., China, a. 1903, m. 1910, Williams 

Tretheway, Lucile D Pac, China, a. 1916, m. 1920. Libby 

Trimble, Lydia A Des M., China, a. 1889, R. 1935 

Trisscl, Maude V Des M., Korea, a. 1914 

Trotter, Charlotte N. W., China, a. 1918 

Troxel, Moneta I N. W., Korea, 5. 1925 

Truckenmiller, M. Irene Des M., India, 5. 1925, r. 1932 

Trvon, Elizabeth V Des M., India, a. 1895, r. 1900 

Tschudv, Marianne H N. W., China, a. 1915, m. 1918, Paddock 

Tubbs, Lulu L N. W., Africa, a. 1917 

Tucker, Alta M Top., India, 5. 1932 

Tucker, M.trgaret Emeline, M.D Cin., China, .S\ 1935 

Tucker, Grace N. Y., Japan, a. 1890, to. 1896, Tague 

Tunison, Bessie D N. W., India, a. 1914, to. 1918, Shipman 

Turner, Elizabeth J Des M., India, a. 1915, R. 1935 

Turner, Mrs. Maud Top., India, a. 1905, m. 1909, Nies 

Turner, Mellony F N. Y., Bulgaria, 5. 1925 

Turner, Sarah B Phila., India, a. 1903, to. 1904. Parker 

Turney, Mrs. L. M Western, South America, a. 1881, r. 1882 

Turtle, Mary B., M.D Top., India, a. 1903, d. 1907 

Tattle, Ora M Cin., Korea, a. 1907, d. 1924 

Twinem, Marguerite Pac, China, S. 1931 

Tyler, Gertrude \V Des M., China, a. 1909, r. 1930 

Tyler, Ursula J Cin., China, a. 1915 

Urech, Lydia N. W., Malaysia, a. 1916, transferred to Central Europe 

Unit 

Vail, Olive Top., Malaysia, a. 1913, r. 1927 

Van Dorsten, Amelia N. W., Me.xico, a. 1889, m. 1894, Lawyer 

Van Dvne, Esther H Bait., North Africa, 5. 1924, del. 

Van Dyne, L. Frances Bait.. North Africa. 5. 1924 

Vance, Marv A Des M., Japan, a. 1887, w. 1892, Belknah, d. 1892 

Vandegrift, Frances C Phila., South America, 5. 1919 

Vanderberg, Annie Minn., China, 5. 1925, det. 

Van Fleet, Edna Marie Cin., Korea, a. 1918, m. 1935. Hobbs 

Van Petten, Mrs. Caroline N. VV., Japan, a. 1881, d. 1916 

Varney. Elizabeth VV Top., China, n. 1898. d. 1918 

Vickery, Loraine L N. W., India, S. 1922. r. 1926 

Vickery, M. Ellen N. W., Italv, a. 1891, R. 1920 

Voight, Mary N. W., India, a. 1908, m. 1911, Perrill 

Voigtiander, Gertrude N. W., India, a. 1912, m. 1916, Tweedie 

Waidman, Isabel N. Y., South America, a. 1896. R. 1905 

Wagner, Dora .\ Top., Japan, a. 1913 

Wal Iron, Rose E Pac, China, .S'. 1922 

Walker, Tennie C Top., China, a. 1918, r. 1932 

Walker, Joyce E N. W., China, a. 1917* det. 

Walker, Marion N. W., Philippine Islands, 5. 1930 

Walker, Susan N. W., South .America, a. 1903, R. 

Wallace, Lydia Ethel Bait., China, a. 1906 

Wallace, Margaret Minn., India, -S. 1922 

Walrath, Pearl C Cin., Mexico, 5. 1932 

Wal.-h, Susan J N. W., India, 5. 1919, r. 1925 

Walter, A. Jeannette Top., Korea, a. 191 1, r. 1933 

Walton, Ida B Phila., Mexico, a. 1890, to. 1891, Mulle 

Wanzer. Menia H N. E., China, a. 1911, r. 1925 



Directory of Missionaries 175 



Ware, Lena N. Y., Italy, 5. 1922, r. 1931 

Warner, Ellen Cin., India, a. 1880, m. 1885, Fox, d. 1927 

Warner, Emma E Top., India, 5. 1919 

Warner, Marian Des M., India, S. 1929 

Warner, Ruth Virginia Col. R., South America, a. 1918, Mexico, 5. 1929 

Warner, Susan M N. W., Mexico, a. 1873, m. 1892, Densmore, d. 1914 

Warrington, Ruth A Top., India, a. 1915 

Wasem. Grace Des M., Burma. .S". 1926, r. 1931 

Washburn, Orilla F Top., Philippine Islands, a. 1912, m. 1924, Jones 

Watrous, Mary N. Y., China, a. 1912 . 

Watson, Harriet L N. W.. China, 5. 1920, del. 

Watson, Rebecca J Top., Japan, a. 1883, R. 1922. d. 1930 

Watts, Annabelle Cin., India, a. 1917, r. 

Waugh, Nora Belle Cin., India, a. 1904* 

Weaver, Georgiana N. Y., Japan, a. 1902, R. 1916 

Webb, Gladys M N. W.. India, .S\ 1930 

Webb, Nora Top., N. Africa, a. 1919 

Webster, Alice S N. Y., South America, S. 1924, m. 1928, Goldschmidt 

Weiss, E. Ruth Des M., Japan, .S. 1920, r. 1927 

Welch, A. Dora Cin., N. Africa, a. 1910, R. 1935 

Welch, Mildred N. W., China, S. 1922, r. 1928, m. 1929. Cranston 

Welles, Doris I Pac, India, S. 1922 

Wells, Annie May Des M., China, a. 1905 

Wells, Elizabeth J Des M. India,, a. 1901 

Wells, Margaret C Col R.. Mexico, 5. 1926. Phila. 5. 1931. r. 1934 

Wells, Phebe C N. Y., China a. 1895 

Wencke, Doris R N. W., China, S. 1920, det. 

Wescott, Ida G N. W.. Malaysia, a. 1915, R. 1928 

West, Esther Irene Cin,. India, 5. 1927*. r. 1929 

West, Nellie Maud Des M., India, 5. 1920 

Westcott, Pauline E N. W., China, a. 1902 

Westfall, Georgia Cin., India, 5. 1921, m. 1922 

Westrup, Charlotte Top., India, S . 1927 

Wheat, Lemira B Top., India, a. 1915, m. 1933, Amerman 

Wheeler, Bernice A ; N. E., China, 5. 1920, del. 

Wheeler, Gertrude V N. E., South America, S. 1920, r. 1925 

Wheeler. Frances N. W., China, a. 1881*, m. 1892, Verity 

Wheeler. Hettie Ada N. W.. Malaysia, a. 1913, m. 1919, Hall 

Wheeler, L. Maude N. W., China, o. 1903* 

Wheelock, Ethel C Cin., India, S. 1921 

Whitcomb, J. Caroline Minn., India, S. 1''23, det. 

White. Anna Laura Minn., Japan, a. 1911, Pac, ,S'. 1927 

White, Laura M Phila., China, a. 1891, R. 1934 

Whiteley, Martha D Phila., North Africa, S. 1925 

Whiteley, Miriam F Phila., South America, 5. 1920, R, 1926 

Whitfield, Mary W Phila., Malaya, 5. 1926, c. L, miss., 1929. m. 1933 

Macky 

Whiting, Ethel L Top.. India, a. 1911 

Whiting, Olive N. Y., Japan, a. 1876, m. 1882, Bishop, d. 1915 

Whitmer, Harriet M N. W.. China, 5. 1924t 

Whitmore, Clara B.. M.D Des M.. China. 5. 1924, ;-. 1935 

Whitney. Alice Pac, Africa. .S. 1931 

Whittaker, M. Lotte Minn., Burma, a. 1904, R. 1912 

Widdifield. Flora M Cin.. India, a. 1896. m. 1898. Chew 

Widney. Mary C Top.. India, a. 1906, m. 1912, Branch 

Wiegand, Marie N. W., India, a. 1914, m. 1918, Boyles 

Wilcox, Alice A Top., China. 5. 1919 

Wildermuth, Pearl C N. Y., France, S. 1931, R. 1932 

Wilk, Helen J N. W., Philippine Islands. S. 1925. R. 1934 

Wilkinson. Lydia A Des M.,China,a.l892, m, 1905, lFt7fetwTOn,5.1921,R. 1929 

Williams, Christiana Minn., China, a. 1901, m. 1902, Hall 

Wilhams, Laura V Bait., India, 5. 1928 

WilUams, Marv E Phila., India, a 1900, d. 1910 

Williamson, Iva M Cin., China. 5. 1921. del. 

Willis, Katharine H Bait., China, a. 1916, r. 1934 

Wilson, Emma W Top., China, S. 1924 

Wilson, Fannie G Cin., Tapan, a. 1896, m. 1900, Alexander 

Wilson, Frances O Des M., China, a. 1889, R. 1915 

Wilson, Frances R Top., China, a. 1914 

Wilson, Mary N. W.. India, a. 1894, m. 1910, Gill, S. 1917, R. 1935 

Wilson, Mary E N. Y., Japan, a. 1889, m. 1896, Buchanan 

Wilson, Minnie E N. W., China, a. 1893, R. 1929 

Wilson, Nellie A Des. M., India, a. 1913, m. Auner 

Wilson, Retta I Cin., India. S. 1924 

Wilson, Ruth McK N. W., South America, 5 1929 

Winslow, Annie S Top., India, a. 1901, R. 1913, S. 1930 



176 Directory of Missionaries 

Winslow, Hazel Des M., Burma, S. 1926 

Wirz, Frieda Cin., India, 5. 1925, del. 

Wisegarver, Pauline N. W., China, 5. 1922. r. 1927 

Wisner, Julia E Cin., India, a. 1885. d. 1917 

Witham, Lois E Top., China, 5. 1920t 

Witt. Helena N. W., China, a. 1903 m. 

Wolcott, Jessie Louise Des M., China, 5. 1928 

Wolcott, Ruth F.. M.D Des M., China, 5. 1927. r. 1932 

Wolfe, Elsie I Phila., Mexico, 5. 1932 

Wolfe, Ruth Phila.. N. Africa, .S. 1935 

Wood, Mrs. Anna M., M D Pac, India. 5. 1928, R. 1934 

Wood, Bertha L Phila., South America, a. 1903*, m. 1906. Robbins 

Wood, Catherine Des M., India, a. 1892. d. 1925 

Wood. Daisy Dean Des M., India, a. 1909, m. 1919, Van Sant 

Wood, Elizabeth N. W.. India, a. 1911 d. 1913 

Wood, Elsie N. Y., South America, a. 1889*, m. 1915, Schofield 

Wood. Grace N. Y., Korea, 5. 1929, c. t., miss. 1931 

Wood. Hazel O Top., India, 5. 1925 

Wood. Lola N. W., Korea, a. 1914, R. 1930 

Woodruff, Frances E N. Y., China. 5. 1919, c. I., miss. 1930 

Woodruff. Jennie G N. W.. Africa, 5. 1925, m. 1932, Schamber 

Woodruff, Mabel A N. Y.. China, a. 1910 

Woodruff, Sadie J N. W., Burma, 5. 1920, r. 1928 

Woods, Grace M N. W.. India, a. 1901, m. 1911, Kingham 

Woodworth, Kate Phila., Japan, a. 1880, m. 1883, Quinn, d. 1924 

Woolston, Beulah Bait., China, a. 1871, R. 1879, d. 1886 

Woolston. Henrietta, M.D Phil., India, a. 1878, dis. 1879 

Woolston. Sarah N. W., China, a. 1871, R. 1896, d. 1910 

Wright, Laura S N. W., India, a. 1895, R. 1929 

Wright, Mildred V D. M., India, 5. 1931 

Wyatt, Lillian D N. W., Mexico, S. 1919, m. 1921, Bowman 

Wysner, Glora M Cin., N. Africa, 5. 1927 

Wvthe, K. Grace Pac, Japan, a. 1909, R. 1931 

Yates. Elizabeth U N. E.. China, a. 1880, R. 1885 

Yeager, Maud N. W., India, a. 1910, m. 1921, Brooks 

Young. EiSe G N. E., China, a. 1892, R. 1929 

Young, Ethel N. W.. Netherlands Indies, a. 1916. r. 1919 

Young. Mariana Cin., Japan, a. 1897, d. 1932 

Young, Marv Elizabeth Col. R., Korea, 5. 1919 

Youtsey, Edith R Top., China, a. 1912 

Zentmire, Cora N. W., Africa, a. 1898, m. 1900, Brewster, d. 1901 

ZoUiker. Johanna Z N. Y.. Japan, a. 1913, r. 1914 

CONTRACT WORKERS 

5 sailed; m marriage; 'daughter of mis.'^ionaries; {detached service; c. e. contract expired, 

Alt man, Esther Cin., Japan, S. 1931. c.e. 

Appenzel'er. Mary Ella Phila., Korea, 5. 1917,* m. 1920, Lacy 

Ashley. Tl elma G Pac, Malaya, 5. 1929, c. e. 

Atkins. Ruth E Minn., Mala\sia. -S". 1912. c. e. 

Bennett. F. Mabelle Bait., Mexico, 5. 1925. c. e. 

Blackburn, Frances E Cin., South America, 5. 1922, c. e. 

Bolton. Mary Lee Minn., France, 5. 1918, c. e. 

Boyce, Florence Phila.. India, 5. 1914, r. e. 

Brewster. Karis Cin., China, 5. 1926,* m. 

Brittain, Blanche F Des M., Japan. 5 1929, c. e. 

Brooks, Alice F Pac, Italy. .S. 1919, m. 1919. Updegrafj 

Brown, Anna M N. W.. India, 5. 1917, c. e. 

Caldwell, Ruth M N. W., China, 5. 1922, m. Wrim 

Chandler, Frances A Cin., South America, S. 1920, c. e. 

Chandler, Mary H Cin., South America. 5. 1920, c. e. 

Chapman, Irene Minn., Malaysia, 5. 1917, c. e. 

Chesney, A. Louise Des M., China. 5. 1922, c. e. 

Cnossen. Sadie M N. W., India, 5. 1927, c. e. 

Corbett Evelyn D Cin., South America, 5. 1931 

Courtney, Margaret E Minn., Italy, 5. 1930, w. 1934, Ferreri 

Davis, Helen T. Minn., India, S. 1923, m. 1926, Graten 

Edwards, Jessie E N. W., China, 5. 1921, c. e. 

Evans, El zabeth Pac, Mexico, 5. 1931, c. e. 

Fairchild. Nora M., M.D N. W., India 5. 1933, c. e. 

Finton. Iva M Phila.. Mexico, S. 1917, c. e. 

Forsythe, Genevieve Cin., Mexico, 5. 1924, c. e. 

Frf dine, Marian C Phila., South America, 5. 1930 c. e. 

Fry, Edna E Phila., Mexico, S. 1916, c. e. 

Garden, Frances E Cin., India, 5. 1924, c. e. 

Garrett. Minnie Hester N. Y., China. S. 1919, c. e. 



Directory of Missionaries 1 77 



Gibbons, Gertrude L. N. E . India, S. 1929, c. e. 

Graves, Anna M N. Y., China, S. 1919, c. e. 

Hammond, Dorothy Top., Malaysia, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Harper, Florence O Bait., Mexico, 5. 1918, c. e. 

Hartman, Martha Phila., South America, 5. 1922, c. e. 

Hatfield, Mrs. Sarah M Pac, South America, 5. 1918, c. e. 

Heath, Neva Minn., Mexico, S. 1923, c. e. 

Howey, Mary E Cin., Japan, 5. 1927, c. e. 

Hoyt, Herma O Cin., Mexico, S. 1919, c. e. 

Tustin. Florence L Top., India. 5. 1923. c. e. 

Killheffer, Marie Top., Japan, i. 1919, c. e. 

Knoles, Edith E Pac, South America, 5. 1931, c. e. 

Lee, Helen Morris Minn., Japan, 5. 1931, c. e. 

Leonard, Ethel L., M.D Pac, China, 5. 1917t, c. e. , 

Lewis, Donna May Top., Japan, S. 1919, c. e. 

Long, Laura V Pac, India, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Longshore, Lillian Phila., Mexico, 5. 1921, c. e. 

Lytton, Ruth Twila Cin., Japan, 5. 1918, c. e. 

Maclay, Jean R Phila., Mexico, 5. 1921, c. e. 

Maddox, Grace Des M., China, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Malberg, Mildred A Minn., Malaysia, 5. 1921, m. 1925, Malmquist 

Matheson, Margaret Phila., Japan 5. 1916, c. e. 

McConnell, Esther M N. Y., Mexico, 5. 1931, c. e. 

Meek, Lucile C Phila., Mexico, 5. 1924, c. e. 

Merryman, Florence Phila., South America, 5. 1933 

Milam, Ava B Col. R., China, S. 1922, c. e. 

Milnes, Frances A Pac, China, .S. 1924, c. e. 

Mitchell, Zoa N. W., Mexico, 5. 1924, c. e. 

Moore, Helen G N. Y., Japan, S. 1931, c. e. 

Myers. Miranda M Pac, India, S. 1915, c. e. 

Paulson. Mildred N. W., Korea, 5. 1931, c. e. 

Peterson, Ruth N. W., India, 5. 1915, c. e. 

Pike, Isabel K Phila., Malaysia, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Plimpton, Margaret N. E., Japan, S. 1916, m. 

Price, Effie C N. W., South America, 5. 1922, c. , 

Raab, Theodora A Pac, China, 5. 1923, c. e. 

Raney Salena Cin., Korea, S. 1930, c. e. 

Richardson, Ruth E Pac, China, S. 193 i, c. e. 

Ritchie. Estelle N. E., Mexico, 5. 1921, c. e. 

Robertson, Winifred Phila., Mexico, S. 1925, c. e. 

Rodgers, Rosetta B Phila., Mexico, 5. 1919, c. e. 

Rowe, Dorothy N. Y., China, 5. 1919*. c. e. 

Rudisill, Mrs. T. F Top., Malaysia, 5. 1918, c. e. 

Seesholtz. Jessie Phila., Mexico, 5. 1915, c. e. 

Sewall, Ruth McK N. W., China, 5. 1924, c. e. 

Shaver, Icy Virginia N. W., India, 5. 1919, c. e. 

Skinner, Geraldine Cin., China, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Smith, Jean Gardiner Minn., South America, 5. 1928, c. e. 

Spencer, Edith A Phila., South America, 5. 1917, m. Ferguson 

Spencer, Helen M Des M., China, 5. 1920, c. e. 

Stevenson, Julia E Cin., France, 5. 1919, c. e. 

Terry, Beatrice C N. W., South America, S. 1930 

Townsend, Elinor B Des M., India, S. 1921, c. e. 

Tucker, Emma Curtiss Top., India, 5. 1932, c. e. 

Twitchell, Thera N. Y., India, 5. 1920, m. Lindsay 

Vandertill, Elizabeth N. W., China. 5. 1920, c. e. 

Vaughan, Elizabeth B Col. R., South America, S. 1918, c. e. 

Yoke, Rea G Cin., Malaysia. S. 1915, m. Shover 

Wadsworth, Lettie I Minn., Philippine Islands, 5. 1929, c. e.. 

Wagy, Ada Minn., Malaysia, S. 1913, m. 1917, Ferree 

Waldorf, Ethel M Top., South America, 5 1928,m. 1934, Wagner. 

Webster, Grace Minn., Malaysia 5. 1914, m. 1917, Hornbeck 

White, Laura Phila., Malaysia. S. 1921, c. e. 

Whitford. Marian T N. Y., China, 5. 1920. c. e. 

Wilson, Julia N. Y., China, S. 1926, c. e. 

Winn, Prudence N. E., Mexico, S. 1921, c. e. 

Zimmerman, Doris Phila., South America, 5. 1930, c. e. 



178 Directory of Missionaries 

SUMMARY 

Missionaries in service 549 

Retired 202 

Resigned 189 

Married 329 

Deceased 225 

Detained 42 

Transferred to National Units 4 

Missionaries sent out since organization, not including contract workers 

Active missionary force November 1, 1934 

Active 549 

Detained 42 

Contract workers 3 



Daughters of missionaries since organization 56 

Self-supporting since organization 12 

Now on detached service 7 

WORKERS UNDER UNITS OF THE INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Miss Esther Bjork Kambini, P. E. A. 

Mrs. Maria Bozinovich Strumitza, Yogoslavia 

Miss Peregrina Chavez Lima, Peru 

Miss Winnie M. Gabrielson Phalera, India 

Miss Agnes Nilsen Hissar, Punjab, India 

Miss Elizabeth Roberts East Gate Hospital, Seoul, Korea 

Miss Hanna Scharpff Hongsung, Korea 

Miss Elsie Schwab Tebing Tinggi, Sumatra, D. E. I. 

Miss Lydia Urech Malaya 

Miss Bessie Ye Kongju Ryung, Manchukuo 

Miss Marian Ye Hsinking, Manchukuo 

Pok Nyo Ye Harbin, Manchukuo 

Two deaconesses La Luz, Mexico 

Two graduates of Sw.'et Memorial Among Auracanian Indians, Chile 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

ARTICLE I— Name 
This organization shall be called the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 
The purpose of this Society is to engage and unite the efforts of Christian 
women in sending missionaries to the women in foreign mission fields of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and in supporting them and national Christian 
teachers and Bible readers in those fields, and in all forms of work carried 
on by the Society; *also to purchase, sell, mortgage, cede, transfer, recuperate 
and in any other way dispose of, acquire, or affect properties movable or im- 
movable (real estate) or any other kind, located in the United States of America 
or in any foreign country; to give or take moneys in loan, establish or grant 
effective rights on real estate, accept legacies, donations, assignments and 
transfers of properties; to celebrate contracts for leases and carry out any 
other act or contract related to the affairs and operations of the Society. 

ARTICLE III— Membership 
The payment of one dollar annually shall constitute membership. The 
payment of twenty dollars shall constitute life membership; one hundred 
dollars a life manager; and three hundred dollars a life patron. 

ARTICLE IV— Organization 
The organization of this Society shall consist of a General Executive 
Committee, co-ordinate Branches, district associations, auxiliary societies, 
to be constituted and limited as laid down in subsequent articles. 

ARTICLE V — General Executive Committee 
L The management and general administration of the affairs of the 
Society shall be vested in a General Executive Committee, consisting of a 
president, one or more vice-presidents, recording secretary and treasurer 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, the corresponding secretary, 
the secretary of the home base, and two delegates from each Branch, the 
secretary of the young people's department and the secretary of the junior 
department, the secretary of student work, recording secretaries of the Foreign 
and Home Departments, the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild, and such 
other persons as the constitution of the said Society shall hereafter from time 
to time provide. 

2. The president, vice-presidents, recording secretary, treasurer, the 
secretary of the young people's department, the secretary of the junior depart- 
ment, the secretary of student work, and the secretary of the \\'esleyan Service 
Guild shall be elected annually by the General Executive Committee. The 
two delegates and reserves shall be elected at the Branch annual meetings. 
Said Committee shall meet in Boston the third Wednesday in April, 1870, 
and annually, or oftener, thereafter at such time and place as the General 
Executive Committee shall annually determine. 

3. The duties of the General Executiv^e Committee shall be: 

(a) To take into consideration the interests and demands of the entire 
work of the Society as presented in the reports of its several secretaries and 
* This provision necessary for legal transfer of real estate in foreign countries. 

179 



180 Constitution 

in the estimates of the needs of mission fields; to ascertain the financial con- 
dition of the Society, to appropriate its money in accordance with the purposes 
and method therein indicated; to devise means for carrying forward the 
work of the Society; fixing the amounts to be raised, employing new mis- 
sionaries, designating their fields of labor, examining the reports of those 
already employed, and arranging with the several Branches the work to be 
undertaken by each. 

(b)* To administrate freely the business and properties of the Society; 
to purchase, sell, mortgage, exchange, grant, transfer, recuperate and in any 
other way dispose of, acquire or affect properties movable and immovable 
(real estate) and of any other kind that the Society now possesses or may in 
future acquire, situated in the United States of America or in any foreign 
country, at whatever price, period of time, special agreement, form of payment, 
cash or time payments, or under any of the other conditions that it may con- 
sider convenient; to give or take moneys in loan, effect, accept and transfer 
mortgages and every kind of effective rights in connection with properties; 
celebrate contracts for leases for periods longer than six years, if necessary; to 
•collect, receive, give receipts and statements of cancellation of all that may be 
owed to the Society; to accept legacies, donations and the transference of 
properties; to settle judicial questions, agree on arbitrators, extend jurisdic- 
tions, make payments other than the ordinary administrative payments, make 
novations, recognize and acknowledge obligations, make reductions and can- 
cellation of debts; to confer powers and effect every other act of administra- 
tion and disposal of properties related to the interests of the Society. 

(c) To transact any other business that the interests of the Society 
may demand, provided the plans and directions of the Committee shall be 
in harmony with the provisions of the constitution. 

ARTICLE VI — Co-ordinate Br.\nches 
1. Co-ordinate Branches of this Society, on their acceptance of this 
relationship under the provisions of the constitution, may be organized in 
accordance with the following general plan for districting the territory of the 
Church: 

NAME STATES INCLUDED HEADQUARTERS 

New England Branch .... New England States Boston, Mass. 

New York Branch New York, New Jersey New York, N. Y. * 

Philadelphia Branch Pennsylvania and Delaware.. . .Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baltimore Branch Maryland, District of Columbia, 

Virginia, North and South Car- 
olina, Georgia and Florida Baltimore, Md. 

Cincinnati Branch Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, 

Tennessee, Alabama and Mis- 
sissippi Cincinnati, Ohio 

Northwestern Branch .... Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wis- 
consin Chicago, 111. 

Des Moines Branch Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas and 

Louisiana Des Moines, Iowa 

Minneapolis Branch Minnesota, North and South 

Dakota Minneapolis, Minn. 

Topeka Branch Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, 

Wyoming, Utah, Texas, New 

Mexico and Oklahoma Topeka, Kans. 

Pacific Branch California, Nevada, Arizona and 

Hawaii Los Angeles, Calif. 

Columbia River Branch . .Montana, Idaho, Washington 

and Oregon Portland, Ore. 

♦ This provision necessary for legal transfer of real estate in foreign countries. 



Constitution 181 

This plan, however, may be changed by an affirmative vote of three- 
fourths of the members of the General Executive Committee present at any 
annual meeting of the same. 

2. The officers of each Branch shall consist of a president, vice-president, 
corresponding secretary, secretary of the home base, recording secretary, 
treasurer and such other officers as shall be necessary for the efficient work 
of the Branch. These officers and such other persons as the Branch may elect 
shall constitute an executive committee for the administration of the affairs 
of the Branch, nine of whom shall be a quorum for the transaction of business. 

This committee and an auditor shall be elected at the annual meeting 
of the Branch, and shall serve until others are chosen in their stead. 

3. The executive committee shall have supervision of the work assigned 
to the Branch by the General Executive Committee, provide for all the 
needs and receive reports from all forms of work carried on by the Society 
which, by the plan of the General Executive Committee, are to be supported 
by the Branch. 

4. Each Branch shall appoint a standing committee of not less than 
five, of which the Branch corresponding secretary shall be chairman, who 
shall investigate the case of any candidate within the limits of the Branch, 
and shall supply such candidate with blanks for application and health certifi- 
cate to be filled out and answered by her, and, when practicable, a personal 
interview shall be had with the candidate by two or more of the committee 
before her papers are forwarded to the Foreign Department. The correspond- 
ing secretary of the Branch presenting missionary candidates shall have a 
personal interview with each candidate before her final appointment to a 
foreign field. 

5. No Branch shall project new work or undertake the support of new 
missionaries, except by the direction or with the approval of the General 
Executive Committee. 

6. Each Branch may make such by-laws as may be deemed necessary 
to its efficiency, not inconsistent with this constitution. 

ARTICLE VII — District Associations 

District associations shall be formed wherever practicable, said asso- 
ciations to have supervision of all auxiliaries within their limits. 

ARTICLE VIII — Auxiliary Societies 
Any number of persons may form a society, auxiliary to that Branch 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society within whose territorial limits 
they may reside, by electing a president, a treasurer, and such other officers as 
may be necessary to the efficient work of the auxiliary. 

ARTICLE I X — Relation to the Missionary Authorities of the Church 

1. In respect to fields of labor, policies, and standards and qualifications 
of missionary candidates, the Society shall work in harmony with the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Its appropriations 
shall be reported to the Board of Foreign Missions at its annual meeting. The 
Society shall have a standing committee which shall meet at stated intervals 
with a similar committee from the Board of Foreign Missions for consultation 
on all matters of mutual interest. 

2. The acceptance, assignment, remuneration, and recall of missionaries 
of the Society shall be determined by the General Executive Committee of the 
Society. 

3. All missionaries sent out by the Society shall labor under the direction 
of the particular conferences or missions of the Church in which they may be 
employed. They shall be appointed annually by the president of the confer- 



182 By-Laws 

ence or mission, and shall be subject to the same rules of removal that govern 
other missionaries, and they shall be members of the Church and quarterly 
conference and the district conferences where they reside. 

4. All the work of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society in foreign 
lands shall be under the direction of the conferences or missions and their com- 
mittees in exactly the same manner as the work of the missionaries of the Board 
of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The superintendent 
or district superintendent shall have the same relation to the work and the 
person in charge of it as he would have were it a work in the pastoral charge 
of any member of the conference or mission. 

5. The funds of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society shall be provided 
by annual, life, honorary, memorial, and extension memberships; by consti- 
tuting life managers and life patrons; by gifts, annuities, bequests, and devises; 
by collections from audiences convened in the interests of the Society; and by 
such other methods as the constitution of the Society shall provide. None of 
these shall interfere with the contributions of the Church, church schools and 
Epworth League to the Board of F~oreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. The amounts so collected shall be reported to the annual confer- 
ence through the preachers in charge, entered among the benevolence collec- 
tions and published in the Annual Conference Journal and the General Minutes. 

ARTICLE X — Change of Constitution 

This constitution may be changed at any annual meeting of the General 
Executive Committee by a three-fourths vote of those present and voting, 
notice of the proposed change having been given at the previous annual 
meeting; but Article IX, embodying paragraphs from the Discipline of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, may not be changed by the General Executive 
Comnittee, but shall be changed automatically to correspond with any 
changes made in these paragraphs of the Discipline by the General Conference 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

BY-LAWS 
I — Officers of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 

(a) The general officers of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society shall 
b^ a president, two vice-presidents in charge of Departments, vice-presiFents- 
at-large, recording secretary, treasurer, and such other officers as shall be 
now or hereafter provided for according to the constitution in Article V. 
These officers shall be elected annually by the General Executive Committee. 

In case of the disability or death of the president, the vice-president who 
is senior in ofllce shall perform the duties of the president. 

In case of the death or resignation of either of the vice-presidents in charge 
of Departments in the interim of the sessions of the General Executive Com- 
mittee, a vice-president pro tempore, to serve until the next session of the 
General E.\ecutive Committee, may be appointed by unanimous vote of the 
remaining general officers on nomination of the Home Department or the 
Foreign Department, according as the vice-president to be chosen is to be 
the presiding officer of one or the other Department. 

In case of the death or resignation of the recording secretary or treasurer, 
the other general officers may, by unanimous vote, choose a successor pro 
tempore, to serve until the next session of the General Executive Committee. 

In case of a vacancy occurring ai interim in representation on an inter- 
denominational board, the chairman of the Department that nominates the 
representative or representatives on the board concerned shall, after con- 
sultation with the chairman of the nominating committee of her Department, 
if such committee exists, appoint a representative for the remainder of the year. 

(^ j) Tnere saall )e i {: i ,■ /al eja.isilor an 1 an au iitor of the accounts of 
the treasurer of the Society, to le elected annually by the General Executive 
Committee. 



By-Laws 183 

II — Duties of Officers 

It shall be the duty of the 

1 . President (a) to preside at all meetings of this Society and of the General 
Executive Committee: (b) with the vice-presidents, vice-presidents-at- 
large, recording secretary and treasurer, in the interim of the sessions of 
the General Executive Committee, to transact business pertaining to the 
Society at large, and not strictly to either the Home Department or the Foreign 
Department, when such business shall require immediate attention, a unani- 
mous vote of these officers being necessary to action except in case one or more 
of said officers shall, by reason of illness or absence from the United States, 
be unable to vote; in which case a unanimous vote of the other officers shall be 
sufficient. In case the vote is not unanimous the matter shall be referred by the 
recording secretary to the Home and Foreign Departments, voting separately, 
a three-fourths vote in each Department, exclusive of the officers, being neces- 
sary to pass a measure. No vote of the general officers taken ad interim 
shall be binding or legal unless the request for such vote shall have been sent 
out by the recording secretary of the Woman's F"oreign Missionary Society 
(or, in case of her disability, by the president) and until the vote itself shall 
have been declared by said secretary after examination of the votes returned; 

(c) with the recording secretary to sign all documents relating to the transfer 
of real estate and other legal papers not otherwise provided for, and to make 
any affidavit or acknowledgment that may be required or necessary thereto; 

(d) with the treasurer to sign all notes and other obligations and evidences of 
indebtedness, which from time to time may be issued by the Society, by the 
authority of the General Executive Committee, or its duly empowered sub- 
committees, the Foreign and Home Departments. 

2. Vice-Presidents (a) to be chairman — one of the Foreign Department, the 
other of the Home Department; (b) to render assistance when needed; (c) with 
the president, vice-presidents-at-large, recording secretary and treasurer, 
in the interim of the sessions of the General Executive Committee, to transact 
business pertaining to the Society at large, and not strictly to either the Home 
Department or the Foreign Department, when such business shall require 
immediate attention, a unanimous vote of these officers being necessary to 
action except in case one or more of said officers shall, by reason of illness or 
absence from the United States, be unable to vote; in which case a unanimous 
vote of the other officers shall be sufficient. In case the vote is not unanimous 
the matter shall be referred by the recording secretary to the Home and 
Foreign Departments, voting separately, a three-fourths vote in each De- 
partment, exclusive of the officers, being necessary to pass a measure. No 
vote of the general officers taken ad interim shall be binding or legal unless 
the request for such vote shall have been sent out by the recording secretary 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society (or, in case of her disability, by 
the president) and until the vote itself shall have been declared by said 
secretary after examination of the votes returned. 

3. Recording Secretary (a) to give notice of all meetings of the General 
Executive Committee; (b) to keep a full record of all their proceedings; 

(c) to present a report of the year's work of this Society at its anniversary; 

(d) to prepare and issue the annual report of the Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society, including the Minutes of the General Executive Committee; (e) to 
prepare and present a Quadrennial Report to the General Conference; (f) 
with the president, to Sign all documents relating to the transfer of real estate 
and other legal papers not otherwise provided for; (g) have custody of the seal 
of the corporation; (h) to affix the corporate seal of the Society whenever the 
corporate seal is required or should be affixed to any document or instrument 
executed on behalf of the Society, unless this duty is performed by the treas- 
urer; (i) with the president, vice-presidents, vice-presidents-at-large, and 
treasurer, in the interim of the sessions of the General Executive Committee, 



184 By-Laws 

to transact business pertaining to the Society at large, and not strictly to either 
the Home Department or the Foreign Department, when such business shall 
require immediate attention, a unanimous vote of these officers being necessary 
to action, except in case one or more of said ofificers shall, by reason of illness 
or absence from the United States, be unable to vote, in which case a unanimous 
vote of the other officers shall be sufficient. In case the vote is not unanimous 
the matter shall be referred by the recording secretary to the Home and 
Foreign Departments, voting separately, a three-fourths vote in each Depart- 
ment, exclusive of the officers, being necessary to pass a measure. No vote of 
the general officers taken ad interim shall be binding or legal unless the request 
for such vote shall have been sent out by the recording secretary of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society (or, in case of her disability, by the 
president) and until the vote itself shall have been declared by said secretary 
after examination of the votes returned. 

4. Treasurer (a) to receive all money from bequests, gifts, donations, or 
legacies made to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and, unless other- 
wise specified by the donor, pay the same to the treasurer of the Branch 
within whose bounds the donor resided at the time of death; (b) to receive all 
money paid into the General Fund by the several Branches, and disburse the 
same, subject to the order of the General Executive Committee; (c) with 
the president, to sign all notes and other obligations and evidences of in- 
debtedness which from time to time may be issued by the Society, by the 
authority of the General Executive Committee, or of its duly empowered 
sub-committees, the Foreign and Home Departments; (d) with the presi- 
dent, vice-presidents, vice-presidents-at-large, and recording secretary, 
in the interim of the sessions of the General Executive Committee, to transact 
business pertaining to the Society at large, and not strictly to either the Home 
Department or the Foreign Department when such business shall require 
immediate attention, a unanimous vote of these officers being necessary to 
action, except in case one or more of said officers shall, by reason of illness or 
absence from the United States, be unable to vote, in which case a unanimous 
vote of the other officers shall be sufficient. In case the vote is not unanimous 
the matter shall be referred by the recording secretary to the Home and 
Foreign Departments, voting separately, a three-fourths vote in each Depart- 
ment, exclusive of the officers, being necessary to pass a measure. No vote 
of the general officers taken ad interim shall be binding or legal unless the 
request for such vote shall have been sent out by the recording secretary 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society (or, in case of her disability, 
by the president) and until the vote itself shall have been declared by said 
secretary after examination of the votes returned; (e) to issue power of 
attorney to persons designated by the General Executive Committee or its 
duly empowered sub-committees, the Foreign Department or the Home De- 
partment; (f) to affix the corporate seal of the Society whenever the corporate 
seal is required or should be affixed to any document or instrument e.xecuted 
on behalf of the Society, unless this duty is performed by the recording 
secretary; (g) to execute release to executors and trustees through whom this 
Society may receive bequests and legacies, and make the required acknowledg- 
ment or affidavit and affix the corporate seal to said releases, and to perform 
such other acts as are required by the Act of Incorporation, and which cannot 
legally be executed by Branch treasurers; (h) with the recording secretary 
to sign such papers as require the formal written assent of the Society authoriz- 
ing appearances in Court to represent the Society or its interests, and to make 
the required acknowledgment or affidavit to such papers and affix the cor- 
porate seal thereto; (i) forward to foreign treasurers a copy of the appropria- 
tions for each mission as soon as practicable after the adjournment of the 
General Executive Committee. 



By-Laws 185 

III — Departments 

There shall be two Departments of the General Executive Committee: 
the Foreign and the Home. 

When the two Departments meet in joint session matters of mutual 
responsibility pertaining to both and not specifically to either may be passed 
upon for presentation to the General Executive Committee in the same way 
and under the same consideration as by vote of either Department acting 
separately. Matters pertaining specifically to either Department shall be 
referred by the joint session to such Department. 

Foreign Department — The Foreign Department shall consist of the presi- 
dent of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, ex-officio, one vice-president 
as chairman, the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, 
the Branch corresponding secretaries and the recording secretary of the 
Department. In the eveat of the inability of a corresponding secretary to 
attend the meetings of this Department, the executive committee of her 
Branch shall have the privilege of sending a substitute with full power. 

Duties of Foreign Department — It shall be the duty of this Department to 
(a) consider estimates and make appropriations for the foreign work; (b) 
conduct the official correspondence with the missionaries and with missions 
assigned for such official correspondence; (c) give careful consideration to 
the requests of missionaries; (d) examine the testimonials of missionary can- 
didates that are presented to it by the Branches, and decide as to their accept- 
ance as missionaries of the Society; (e) consider all matters that may be 
brought before the General Executive Committee relative to nationals of the 
mission fields; (f) consider all foreign field matters requiring attention in the 
interim of sessions of the General Executive Committee, and decide on such 
action as shall be ordered by a majority vote of the members of the Depart- 
ment, if the vote be taken at a regular meeting of the Department, but by a 
three-fourths vote of all members if the vote be taken by correspondence except 
in case of the disability or death of one of more members, in which case a three- 
fourths vote of the other members shall suffice. If, however, it be desired to 
reverse or materially alter by correspondence actions taken when the Depart- 
ment was in session, a vote of twelve members shall be necessary. No vote of 
the Foreign Department taken ad interim shall be binding or legal unless the 
request for such vote shall have been sent out by the person who, for the time 
being, is the recording secretary of the Foreign Department, and unless the 
vote itself shall have been dsclared by said secretary after due examination of 
the vote returned to said secretary; (g) present a full written report of its 
action during the year to the General Executive Committee for approval and 
permanent record; (h) hold semi-annual meeting at such time and place as 
■shall be designated by its chairman and secretary; (i) appoint the official 
correspondents and foreign treasurers; (j) present to the General Executive 
Committee, through the Branch corresponding secretaries, a statement of the 
Branch appropriations and furnish a copy of the same in itemized form for 
publication; (k) through the official correspondents furnish a report of the 
foreign work for publication in the annual report of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society. 

Hjme Department — The Home D^partm^nt shall consist of the president 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, ex-officio, one vice-president as 
chairman, the Branch secretaries of the home base and the recording 
secretary of the Department. In the event of the inability of a secretary 
■of the home base to attend the msetings of this Department, the executive 
committee of her Branch shall have the privilege of sending a substitute with 
full power. 



186 By-Laws 

Duties of Home Department—It shall be the duty of this Department to (a) 
superintend all publications, the work of the special secretaries, and all 
other interests pertaining to this Department; (b) present to the General 
Executive Committee nominations for editors, publisher, and special secre- 
taries, and in each case where salaries are paid to designate the amount; (c) 
receive and consider all reports of editors, publisher and special secretaries; 
(d) have charge of literature for meetings held outside of the country, the 
expense therefor to be paid from the General Fund; (e) present a full written 
report of its action during the year to the General Executive Committee for 
approval and permanent record; (f) consider all cases of emergency relating to 
the Home Department which may arise in the interim of sessions of the 
General Executive Committee, and decide on such action as shall be ordered 
by a majority vote of the members of the Department, if the vote be taken at a 
regular meeting of the Department, but by a three-fourths vote of all members 
if the vote be taken by correspondence. If, however, it be desired to reverse 
or materially alter by correspondence actions taken when the Department 
was in session, a vote of ten members shall be necessary. No vote of the 
Home Department, taken ad interim, shall be binding or legal unless the re- 
quest for such vote shall have been sent out by the person, who, for the time 
being, is the recording secretary of the Home Department, and unless the 
vote itself shall have been declared by said secretary after due examination of 
the votes returned to said secretary; (g) resolve itself into committees on the 
various sections of its work; (h) present to the General Executive Committee 
the annual report of the home work, with statistics and receipts by Branches. 



IV — Voting Privileges 

The general secretaries, whose duties logically allocate them to the 
Home Department shall be given the vote in that Department on all questions 
except those definitely connected with Branch finance. 

The recording secretary of each Department shall be given the vote in 
the Department of which she is a member, with the exception noted above. 



V — Delegates 

The recording secretary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
shall organize the delegates to the General Executive Committee into a 
conference, which shall hold at least three sessions for the purpose of nominating 
three delegates to serve on the committee of nominations and considering 
measures for the promotion of the interests of the work in the Branches. They 
shall attend the public meetings and such sessions of the Foreign and Home 
Departments as may be open to them. When important changes or new 
by-laws are to come before the General Executive Committee, a copy of the 
same shall be presented to the delegates on the day previous. 



VI — General Office at New York 

There shall be a general office at New York. 

The purpose of its maintenance shall be to (a) serve as a bureau of general 
information regarding the work of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
at home and abroad; (b) serve as a central agency for those interests common 
to all Branches which can be more effectively and economically conducted 
through such a center; (c) form the point of contact between the Woman's 



By-Laws 187 

Foreign Missionary Society and other organizations of related interest in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and in other denominations; (d) render assistance 
to outgoing and returning missionaries; (e) serve in other lines as determined 
by the standing committee on general office. 



VII — Secretary of General Office 

There shall be a secretary of the general office. 

It shall be the duty of the secretary of the general office to express the 
purpose of the general office under the direction of the standing committee 
on general office. 



\'III — Special Secretaries for the General Work 

There shall be a secretary of the young people's department, a secretary 
of the junior department, a secretary of student work, a secretary of the 
VVesleyan Service Guild, nominated by the Home Department and elected 
annualh' by the General Executive Committee. Field secretaries shall be 
employed as required by the Home Department. These secretaries shall send 
their statistical reports to the Home Department by the day of its opening 
session. 

Duties of the Secretary of the Young People's Department — -It shall be the 
duty of the secretary of the young people's department to (a) superintend 
and devise plans for the work of this department; (b) conduct correspondence 
with Branch superintendents of the young people's department; (c) receive 
from Branch superintendents an annual statistical report, which shall corre- 
spond with the one presented to the Branch annual meeting; (d) prepare the 
annual report of the department for the General Executive Committee, showing 
statistics by Branches; (e) represent the department in significant gatherings; 
(f) provide material necessary for periodicals and press reports; (g) perform 
such other duties as the Home Department may define and the General Ex- 
ecutive Committee approve. 

Duties of the Secretary of the Junior Department — It shall be the duty of the 
secretary of the junior department to (a) superintend and devise plans for 
the work of this department; (b) conduct correspondence with Branch super- 
intendents of the junior department; (c) receive from Branch superintendents 
an annual statistical report, which shall correspond with the one presented to 
the Branch annual meeting; (d) prepare the annual report of the department 
for the General Executive Committee, showing statistics by Branches; (e) rep- 
resent the department in significant gatherings; (f) provide material necessary 
for periodicals and press reports; (g) perform such other duties as the Home 
Department may define and the General Executive Committee approve. 

Duties of the Secretary of Student Work — It shall be the duty of the secre- 
tary of student work to (a) superintend and devise plans for the work of this 
department; (b) conduct correspondence with the Branch student secretaries; 

(c) receive from each Branch student secretary an annual statistical report 
which shall correspond with the one presented to the Branch annual meeting; 

(d) prepare the annual report of the department for the General Executive 
Committee, showing statistics by Branches; (e) represent the Society in 
significant gatherings; (f) provide material necessary for periodicals and 
press reports; (g) perform such other duties as the Home Department may 
define and the General Executive Committee approve. 



188 By-Laws 

Duties of the Secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild — It shall be the duty 
of the secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild to (a) act as chairman of the 
central committee, (b) superintend and devise plans for the work of the Guild, 
(c) conduct correspondence with the conference secretaries or with the Guild 
units, (d) receive from them semi-annual reports, (e) report to the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society. 

IX — Branch Officers 

There shall be in each Branch a president, vice-president, corresponding 
secretary, secretary of the home base, recording secretary, treasurer, superin- 
tendent of the young people's department, superintendent of the junior 
department, secretary of literature, and such other officers as each Branch 
shall determine. 

Duties of Branch Officers — It shall be the duty of the 

Branch President to (a) have general supervision of the afTairs of the 
Branch; (b) preside at all meetings of the Branch and of its executive com- 
mittee; (c) be ex-officio member of all standing committees, with the privilege 
of voting. 

Branch Vice-President to (a) perform all the duties of the president in her 
absence; (b) render assistance when needed. 

Branch Corresponding Secretary to (a) superintend all interests of the 
Branch pertaining to the foreign field; (b) conduct the correspondence of the 
Branch with foreign missionaries and missionary candidates; (c) sign all orders 
on the Branch treasury, including foreign remittances, in accordance with the 
appropriations; (d) give to the Branch all foreign communications, plans and 
business of the Branch essential to the futherance of the work; (e) attend and 
present a report of her work at all Branch annual and quarterly meetings, 
and submit an annual report for publication in the Branch annual report; 
(f) perform such other duties as the Branch may define. 

Branch Secretary of the Home Base to (a) superintend all interests of 
the Branch pertaining to the home field; (b) conduct the correspondence 
with the special secretaries, the conference secretaries, and the Branch super- 
intendents; (c) serve as an ex-officio member of all Branch standing com- 
mittees, with privilege of voting; (d) assist in the preparation of the Branch 
annual report; (e) attend and present a report of the home work at all Branch 
annual and quarterly meetings, and submit an annual report including statistics 
by conferences, for publication in the Branch annual report, and, as required, 
for the annual report of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society; (f) perform 
such other duties as the Branch may define. 

Branch Recording Secretary to (a) give notice of all Branch meetings; (b) 
keep a full record of all proceedings; (c) furnish reports of quarterly and 
annual meetings for publication; (d) prepare for the Branch annual report 
a summary of the proceedings of the Branch executive committee through- 
out the year; (e) receive for publication in the Branch annual report the 
reports of Branch officers, conference secretaries, special superintendents, 
and such other material for permanent record as the Branch shall determine. 

Branch Treasurer to (a) receive all funds of the Branch; (b) make and 
promptly forward the quarterly foreign remittances according to the appro- 
priations, upon the written order of the Branch corresponding secretary; (c) 
disburse other funds under the direction of the Branch executive committee. 



By-Lazvs 189 

upon the written order of the Branch corresponding secretary; (d) present 
full items of receipts and disbursements annually and quarterly to the Branch, 
and furnish a copy to the Branch corresponding secretary and the secretary 
of the home base; (e) prepare an itemized report for the Branch annual 
meeting and for publication in the Branch annual report; and (f) perform 
such other duties as each Branch may define. 

Branch Secretary of Student Work to (a) present to Methodist women 
students the purposes and current work of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society, and interest them in personal service for the Society after 
leaving college; (b) in each student center of the Branch, secure a student 
center chairman who, with a committee that she shall choose, shall 
work out plans, for the promotion of missionary interest among students; 
(c) conduct correspondence with and receive reports from the student center 
chairman; (d) keep in touch with prospective candidates in co-operation with 
the Branch corresponding secretary; (e) make an annual report to the 
secretary of the home base of the Branch, sending duplicate to the general 
student secretary, and provide material for press reports; (f) be ex-ofjicio 
member of the Branch candidate committee. 

Branch Secretary of Literature to (a) advance the interests and increase 
the sale of the literature and publications; (b) have charge, in connection 
with the Branch committee on literature and the agent of supplies, of 
exhibition and sale of Woman's Foreign Missionary Society publications 
at the various public gatherings and conventions throughout the Branch,, 
the expense to be borne by the Branch within whose bounds such meeting is 
held; (c) present quarterly and annual reports to the secretary of the home 
base, and to the quarterly and annual meetings of the Branch; (d) encourage 
the organization of mission study circles to study the textbook of the united 
study course. 

Branch Superintendent of the Young People's Department to (a) superin- 
tend and devise plans in her department, under the leadership of the secretary 
of the young people's department, and in co-operation with the secretary of 
the home base and conference secretaries; (b) conduct correspondence with 
and receive reports from conference superintendents, and report quarterly 
and annually to the secretary of the home base; (c) send to the secretary of 
the young people's department an annual statistical report, which shall 
correspond with the one presented at the annual meeting; (d) attend and 
present reports at the Branch annual and quarterly meetings; (e) perform 
such other duties as the Branch may require. 

Branch Superintendent of the Junior Department to (a) superintend and 
devise plans in her department, under the leadership of the secretary of the 
junior department, and in co-operation with the secretary of the home base 
and conference secretaries; (b) conduct correspondence with and receive 
reports from conference superintendents, and report quarterly and annually 
to the secretary of the home base; (c) send to the secretary of the junior 
department an annual statistical report, which shall correspond with the one 
presented at the annual meeting; (d) attend and present reports at the Branch 
annual and quarterly meetings; (e) perform such other duties as the Branch 
may require. 

Branch Secretary of Field Support to (a) stimulate interest in the support 
of orphans, Bible women, assistants and other forms of special work, under 
the direction of the corresponding secretary; (b) keep an accurate record of 
objects supported and patrons giving support; (c) conduct correspondence 
with patrons and forward to them communications received from the mission- 
aries concerning the work; (d) present reports at Branch annual and quarterly 
meetings; (e) perform such other duties as the Branch may require. 



190 By-Laws 

Branch Secretary of Extension Work to (a) develop plans for piomotin? 
the work of the Society among shut-ins, women whose duties confine them to 
home or business, or any others who cannot attend meetings and take part 
in the usual activities of the Society; (b) secure members in churches where 
there is no auxiliary; (c) prepare such extension groups for organization as 
auxiliaries as rapidly as possible; (d) conduct correspondence with and receive 
reports from conference secretaries of extension work; (e) prepare plans 
and reports for presentation at Branch meetings and for publication; (f) report 
to secretary of the home base and committee of the Home Department 
on extension work. 

Branch Secretary of Christian Stewardship to (a) develop plans for pro- 
moting the work of this department by distribution of literature, correspond- 
ence and public presentations; (b) conduct correspondence with and receive 
reports from conference secretaries of stewardship; (c) prepare plans and 
reports for presentation at Branch meetings and for publication; (d) report 
to secretary of home base and committee of the Home Department on 
stewardship. 

X — ^Branch Finance Committee 

1. There shall be a Branch finance committee composed of at least five 
members, including the following: president, corresponding secretary, home 
base secretary and treasurer. One of the duties of this committee shall be to 
recommend at the beginning of each year, an appropriation for Branch home 
administration of sufficient size to provide for the home administration budget 
of the Branch. 

XI — ^Depots of Supplies 

Each Branch shall maintain a depot of supplies for the circulation and 
sale of literature and other helps, which shall be under the direction of a 
Branch committee. The chairman of this committee shall report annually 
to the Home Department through the Branch secretary of the home base. 

Xn — Missionary Candidates 

1. Each parson who offers harsslf as a missionary candidate shall declare 
her belief that she is (a) divinely called to the work of a foreign missionary; 

(b) actuated only by a desire to work in accordance with the will of God; 

(c) that she intends to make foreign missionary work the service of her effective 
years. 

2. The preferred age of a candidate shall be twenty-three to thirty years. 

3. She shall be a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

4. The candidate shall fill out required application blanks and present 
them to the corresponding secretary of the Branch in whose territory she 
resides. These application papers shall be presented by the corresponding 
secretary to the Branch standing committee on candidates, by which com- 
mittee the case shall be investigated and reported, through the corresponding 
secretary, to the Foreign Department, where it shall be again considered 
and passed upon. 

5. In case a candidate shall not have been sent out within two years 
from date of her acceptance, the question of her acceptance must be again 
presented to the Foreign Department before final appointment. 

6. Applicants who are on the mission field or who do not reside in the 
United States of America shall present to the Foreign Department such cre- 
dentials as are required of other candidates. 



By-Lc 



191 



XIII — Missionaries 



1. On acceptance by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society each 
missionary shall (a) be under the control of the General Executive Committee, 
directly amenable to the corresponding secretary of the Branch supporting 
her; (b) enter into the following contract by and with the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society through the corresponding secretary of the Branch sup- 
porting her. This contract shall be signed in duplicate for file by the mission- 
ary and the corresponding secretary of the Branch supporting her; (c) this 
relation shall be sustained for a period of not longer than five years. 

CONTRACT 

"I agree to render five years' continuous service from this date 
as a missionary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and to conform to the rules and regu- 
lations of the said Society as they now exist or shall hereafter be 
modified during my term of service. 

"Failure to keep the above contract shall render me liable to the 
repayment to the Society of expense incurred by it for my outfit 
and passage. 

Date Signed 

"We agree to compensate 

for the above described services by paying the traveling expenses of a 
round trip from her home to her field of labor; salary at the rate of 

$ per year, from the date of her arrival at her field of 

labor until the date of her departure therefrom; and home salary, 
after the completion of five years' service on the field, at the rate 
and for the period prescribed by the by-laws of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society. 

Date Signed Cor. Sec'y. 

of the Branch. 

On behalf of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church." 

(c) consider the regulations of the Society named in the constitution 
and by-laws as binding as the terms of the contract, and failure to conform 
to them on the part of the missionary shall release the Society from all financial 
liability; (d) devote her entire time and attention to her work; (e) serve for 
five years as the first term and six years for each succeeding term except in 
Malaysia; Philippine Islands; Netherlands Indies; Chengtu and Chungking, 
China; Angola and Rhodesia, Africa; North Andes and Eastern South America, 
where all terms shall be five years. 

No missionary supported by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
shall adopt any child as her own, nor bring foreign-born girls or helpers to this 
country except upon the recommendation of the field reference committee 
of the conference in which they reside and with the permission of the F"oreign 
Department of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

At the close of a missionary's first term of service, the question of her 
return to the field shall be as carefully considered by the Foreign Department 
as was her original acceptance for service. It shall, however, not be necessary 
for her to present new papers, except a medical certificate. 

2. Classification of Missionaries 

For purposes of administration missionaries shall be classified as follows: 
active, furloughed, detained, self-supporting, on detached service, retired, 
resigned, discontinued, married, deceased. 



192 By-Laws 

(a) Active missionaries are those engaged in specific work assigned them 
on the field. 

(b) Furloughed missionaries are those who have received permission 
from the Society for temporary absence from the mission field. 

(c) Detained missionaries are those who for reasons satisfactory to the 
Foreign Department have remained away from the field longer than two 
years, but expect to return at some future time. This relation shall be sus- 
tained for a period of not longer than five years. 

(d) Self-supporting missionaries are those who serve without salary; but 
if regularly accepted by the Foreign Department they shall have the same stand- 
ing as those who receive salary and shall be amenable to the same regulations. 

(e) Missionaries on detached service are regularly accepted missionaries 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society who are assigned to union in- 
stitutions or union work in which the Society is participating. They retain 
all the rights and privileges of regular missionaries except that from their 
retirement allowance shall be deducted any retirement allowance that they 
may receive through the union agencies with which they have been connected. 

(f) Retired missionaries are those whose services have been deemed 
impracticable by reason of family conditions, impaired health, advancing 
years or other causes, and who, after two years' furlough, have been placed 
on the retired list. 

(g) Resigned missionaries are those have been accorded the privilege 
of withdrawing from service as missionaries of the Society. 

(h) Discontinued missionaries are those who have been deemed by a 
three-fourths vote of the Foreign Department unfit for continuance in the 
service. 

3. In Active Service 

(a) Outfit and Furniture— Tha Society shall provide each missionary, 
when beginning service, with $200 for personal outfit, and shall provide a 
furniture allowance of $100. Furniture and medical outfit provided by the 
Society shall be the property of the Society and subject to its disposition. 

(b) Salary — -The salaries of missionaries shall include all expenses hitherto 
classed as incidentals and shall be $800 in all India Conferences and Mexico 
Conference; $900 in all China Conferences and in Burma, Malaya, Netherlands 
Indies and Philippine Islands Conferences; $950 in Africa (except North 
Africa); $1,000 in Europe, North Africa, Japan, Korea and South America 
Conferences. The value of the salary on the field shall be based on the par 
of exchange between U. S. gold and the currency of the country concerned, 
any exchange loss to be made up by the Society and any gain to belong to it.* 

The first year's work of a new missionary shall be so planned by the mis- 
sion that the major part of her time shall be given to the study of the language. 

(c) Finance — -Each missionary shall (1) incur no expense which has not 
been authorized by the General Executive Committee; (2) apply to private 
sources for financial aid only by authority from the Foreign Department of 
the General Executive Committee; (3) keep an itemized account of receipts 
and disbursements, also of all donations, fees, and other sums received for 
the support of the work, and report the same in her annual financial statement 
to the conference treasurer; (4) present estimates and all other matter requir- 
ing the action of the General Executive Committee through the field reference 
committee of the conference in which her work is located; (5) include in 
her estimates for Bible women and zenana workers all expenses of conveyances 

* Grants to missionaries, in addition to salary, are as follows: for Japan, Korea and Mexico. 
$200; for Philippine Islands, Malaya, Netherlands Indies, $100; full exchange gain allowed 
for Europe. 



By-Laws 193 

and teachers, and in those for scholarships the cost of fuel, light, medicines, 
and minor expenses necessary in the maintenance of the school. 

(d) Reports and Records — Each missionary shall (1) furnish the official 
correspondent with all facts as required; (2) report each quarter to the cor- 
responding secretary of the Branch supporting her and to | the .'superintendent 
of the district in which her work is located; (3) send annual communications 
for patrons supporting field support to the Branch secretary of field support; 
(4) keep a clear record of all field support in her charge, and on her removal 
or furlough transfer this record to her substitute or successor. 

4. Furloughed 

(a) Each missionary when entering on furlough shall receive such amount 
as will presumably cover (1) cost of travel by direct route, and (2) authorized 
incidental expenses. Any balance shall be applied on home salary. 

(b) The Society shall be liable for travel expenses only to the extent 
necessitated b}' conformity to the regulations of the Foreign Department as 
to lines of travel and incidental expenses. If a missionary returns home early 
for any other reason than ill health, travel expenses shall be paid only on 
authorization by the Foreign Department. 

(c) Fifteen months absence from the field shall constitute the regular 
furlough. Minor adjustments as to the date for beginning furlough may be 
made on the field; but a deviation of more than six months from the regular 
time shall be on the authority of the Foreign Department. The missionary's 
last furlough before retirement shall be two years in length. 

(d) In all cases where the relations of the missionary with the Society are 
satisfactory, her home salary for the fifteen months of the regular furlough 
shall be at the rate of $850 a year; if the Foreign Department sanctions exten- 
sion of furlough, or if the furlough is the last before retirement, salary for nine 
months, after the first fifteen months, shall be at the rate of $600 a year. 
In cases of return before furlough is due, the foregoing shall apply until the 
next meeting of the Foreign Department, if salary is needed. Home salary, 
except as elsewhere provided, shall begin upon date of leaving work on the 
field, and shall continue until return thereto, provided said return is within 
two years. In case return is delayed beyond two years, the question of a 
further continuation of home salary shall be referred to the Foreign Depart- 
ment. In the case of a missionary who has completed a full term of service 
and does not expect to return to the field, home salary at the rate of $850 a 
year shall be paid for nine months only from the date of leaving work on the 
field. 

(e) Missionaries indigenous to the field shall receive full salary when on 
furlough, in which case no furlough expenses will be paid by the Society. 
This provision shall apply only to missionaries in satisfactory relation to the 
Society and for the term of furlough authorized by the General Executive 
Committee through the Branch supporting the missionary. 

(f) In case of emergency demanding immediate return home, the mis- 
sionary shall obtain the written approval of the field reference committee, 
or, where there is no field reference committee, of the bishop and a majority 
of the missionaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society in her con- 
ference, and shall send this statement to her official correspondent and a 
copy to her Branch corresponding secretary. 

(g) She shall, unless excused by the corresponding secretary of the 
Branch supporting her, attend the first session of the General Executive Com- 
mittee held after her return from the foreign field, provided she is returning 
after a term of at least four years. Her travel expenses to and from the 
place of meeting shall be paid from the same fund as those of members of 
that body. 

(h) For information regarding the return of a missionary after furlough 
each member of the field reference committee shall fill out and sign duplicate 



194 By-Laws 

blanks, one of which shall be sent to the official correspondent and one to the 
corresponding secretary of the Branch supporting the missionary concerned. 
The bishop of the Area is requested to send blanks in like manner. These 
blanks shall be prepared and sent before the missionary leaves the field. To 
authorize return to the field there shall be a two-thirds vote of the Foreign 
Department, based upon the information contained in the blanks received 
from the field, a new medical certificate, and the recommendation of the 
corresponding secretary of the Branch supporting the missionary. 

(i) As soon as possible after the granting of a furlough, the missionary 
shall be informed by the Foreign Department as to whether or not her return 
to the field will be sanctioned, if at the time for return health conditions 
be satisfactory. 

5. Retired 

(a) The missionary shall be automatically retired at the end of the fur- 
lough closing nearest to the day when she reaches the age of sixty-eight years. 
In case a previous furlough or return to the field may be arranged in such a way 
as to make an additional term possible before retirement, and in case the 
missionary desires such an arrangement, the matter shall be referred to the 
Foreign Department and each case decided on its merits. 

(b) Missionaries may be retired earlier by a three-fourths vote of the 
Foreign Department. 

6. Resigned 

(a) The resignation of a missionary shall cause the obligation of the 
Society for salary and traveling expenses to cease. Traveling expenses may 
be paid if the Foreign Department so orders, but the decision shall be made 
for each case on its merits. 

(b) The marriage of a missionary shall be considered a resignation. 

7. Discontinued 

(a) The Foreign Department shall have authority by a three-fourths vote 
to sever the relations between a missionary and the Society. 

(b) After discontinuance she shall be paid in final settlement a lump sum 
equal to one-fourth of the annual salary last received by her when a mission- 
ary; and, if presentation of bills be made within three months after notice 
of discontinuance has been given, she shall be paid travel expenses to her 
home to the extent provided by by-law XIII, 4 (b). 

8. In case a missionary withdraws from the work of the Society or is 
recalled, unless she leaves the field within two months after withdrawal, or 
after receiving notification of recall, no travel allowance shall be granted her 
and her salary shall be discontinued, except by special action of the Foreign 
Department. 

XIV — Contract Teachers 

1. Contract teachers shall be members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

2. On acceptance by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society each 
contract teacher shall (a) be appointed for a term of three years and shall be a 
member of the woman's conference; (b) while on the field have the same 
prerogatives, privileges and obligations as a missionary, except provision for 
language study; (c) enter into the following 

CONTRACT 

"I agree to 

render three years' consecutive service as a teacher in the schools of 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church and, during my term of service, to be subject to and 
governed by the same rules and regulations as those which govern 
the regular missionaries of the Society, which rules I have read and 
understand. 
Date Signed 



By-Laws 195 

"For these services we agree to compensate 

as follows: 

"We agree to pay expenses incurred by her round trip from her 
home in America to her field of labor over routes prescribed by the 

Society; to provide her with all of which 

is subject to the provision that she conform to the rules and regula- 
tions which govern the regular missionaries of the Society. 

Date Signed Cor. Sec'y 

of the Branch 

On behalf of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church." 

(d) In case she has served four or more years receive, for the first three 
months after leaving her work on the field, home salary at the rate paid to 
missionaries during the first year of furlough. 

XV — Nation.\l Women Workers 
National women workers shall be eligible to full membership in the 
woman's conference and to appointment by the bishop on the following 
conditions: 

1. They shall be members of the Methodist Episcopal Church or, in 
Japan, of the Japan Methodist Church, or in Korea, of the Korean Methodist 
Church, or in Mexico, of the Methodist Church of Mexico, graduates of a 
recognized high school, and shall have had two years additional educational 
training in college, normal, medical, kindergarten, nurse, or Bible training 
school. 

2. They shall be recommended for such conference membership by the 
woman's conference, within whose bounds they are working or residing and 
by the bishop of the Area or the superintendent of the mission. 

3. They shall be eligible to membership in any of the committees of the 
woman's conference except that eligibility to membership in the field refer- 
ence committee shall be determined by vote of the woman's conference; they 
shall be entitled to regular annual vacations, but more extended leave of 
absence shall be without salary, and in view of their domicile, they shall not 
be entitled to furlough in America, nor to a retiremsnt allowance unless retire- 
ment funds are provided on the field. They shall qualify in the language 
according to a course of study prescribed by the central conferences of their 
respective fields, where such exist, otherwise by the woman's conference. 

XVT — Organiz.\tion on the Field 

1. Woman's Conference — Working in co-operation with each conference 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church on the foreign field there shall be, wherever 
practicable, a woman's conference. This woman's conference shall be made 
up of the missionaries (including contract teachers) of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society, such wives of missionaries of the Board of Foreign Missions 
as are in charge of work for the Society, workers provided for by by-law XIII, 
and such other women workers as each woman's conference and the central 
conference ot the field concerned, shall from time to time determine. 

This conference shall meet annually and elect a president, a vice-president, 
secretary, ofiicial correspondent and such other officers as shall be needed, hear 
reports, appoint committees, and consult concerning the work in charge of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society within the bounds of the conference. 

All important recommendations to th3 Gan^ral Executive Committee 
through the Foreign Department shall first be acted upon by the woman's 
conference. 

This conference may delegate any of its functions to the field reference 
committee or other committees. 



196 By-Laws 

2. Foreign Treasurer — There shall be in each annual conference, mis- 
sion conference or group of conferences, as the Foreign Department shall 
direct, a foreign treasurer for the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, 
appointed by the Foreign Department. 

It shall be the duty of each foreign treasurer to (a) forward receipts im- 
mediately upon receiving remittances from the Branch treasurers; (b) apply 
the funds of the Society only for the purpose designated by the General 
Executive Committee, and make no disVjursements in excess of the appropria- 
tions made by the General Executive Committee, nor for objects not included 
in the appropriations of that Committee; (c) pay all appropriations, including 
salaries and buildings, on the basis of currency of the country at i)ar;(d) 
pay money for buildings on order of the building committee in such amounts 
and at such time as required by the contract; (e) invest, on action of the field 
reference committee of the woman's conference, all money sent to the 
field for buildings and land, the use of which is temporarily delayed; (f) 
forward to the Branch corresponding secretary on January first and July first 
of each year itemized statements, both in local currency and in U. S. gold, of 
balance arising from unused current work appropriations, exchange, or other 
source, and hold such funds subject to the order of the corresponding secre- 
tary from whose Branch said funds accrue; (g) forward to the general treas- 
urer on January first and July first of each year itemized statements, both in 
local currency and in U. S. gold, of amounts received and expended for build- 
ings and property, taxes and insurance, and such other items as are paid by the 
general treasurer to the conference concerned; (h) forward estimates ap- 
proved by the field reference committee and printed according to pre- 
scribed form, two copies to each of the general ofiicers, and three copies to 
the corresponding secretary of each Branch, to insure arrival on or before 
September first; (i) receive building accounts properly audited, and hold them 
in custody for the Society. 

3. Field Property Committee — There shall be a field property committee 
in each woman's conference, nominated by the field reference committee 
and elected by the woman's conference. The treasurer of the annual con- 
ference, mission conference or group] of conferences shall be ex-officio mem- 
ber of this committee, without vote except in the conference of which she is 
a member. 

It shall be the duty of the field property committee to (a) have in charge, 
under the direction of the Foreign Department of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society, all matters relative to the purchase and sale of property, 
erection and insurance of buildings, and extensive repairs for which appropria- 
tions have been made. No building, however financed, shall be erected on the 
property of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society without the approval 
of the field property committee and without consultation and mutual agree- 
ment with the Foreign Department. After a building has been authorized by 
the Foreign Department, the property committee shall appoint a local building 
committee, which shall have authority to draw up plans, make contracts, 
subject to the approval of the property committee, audit bills, and direct the 
work; (b) secure safe legal titles to all real estate purchased by the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society. When possible, all deeds shall be made to the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, or 
to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church in trust 
for the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church; where neither of these is possible, they shall be made in the way that 
shall be approved by the field reference committee and the finance committee 
of the Board of Foreign Missions of that conference; (c) have all deeds re- 
corded in accordance with the laws of the country and preserve all deeds and 
other legal papers not forwarded to America in the office of the treasurer of 
the conference, mission conference or group of conferences whenever it is 



By-Laws 197 

practicable so to do; (d) keep a record of all real estate belonging to the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society; (e) furnish the committee on real 
estate with information as required; (f) keep on file all documents giving 
power of attorney for the transfer of property within the conference; (g) 
furnish the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society with a 
copy (and a translation when the deeds are not in English) of deeds to all 
property acquired by purchase or other means. 

4. Field Reference Committee — Each woman's conference shall have a 
field reference committee to be elected annually by ballot. The Bishop of the 
area shall be a member ex-officio. Others eligible to membership in the field 
reference committee shall be (a) active missionaries of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society; (b) such w'ives of missionaries of the Board of Foreign 
Missions as are in charge of work for the Society, and (c) national women 
workers if declared eligible by the woman's conference. This committee shall 
consist of not less than six nor more than nine representative members, two- 
thirds of whom shall be missionaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society. The treasurer of the woman's annual conference, mission conference 
or group of conferences shall be, ex-officio, an additional member of this 
committee without vote except in the conference of which she is a member. 

It shall be the duty of the field reference committee to (a) prepare esti- 
mates which require ihe action of the General Executive Committee; (b) 
consider the furlough of missionaries and forward recommendations concern- 
ing the individual cases to the Foreign Department; (c) in consultation with 
the bishop in charge, approve, and through the chairman and secretary sign 
contracts, in accordance with the appropriations and the regulations in force 
toj the employment of workers engaged on the field to fill major positions* in 
the work of the Society; (d) consider all matters of general interest arising 
during the interim of their annual meetings. 

XVII — Official Visitors to the Mission Field 

1. When in the judgment of the Foreign Department it shall seem de- 
sirable that an official visitor be sent to the mission field, a nomination shall 
be made by a two-thirds vote of the Foreign Department and presented by 
the Foreign Department to the General Executive Committee for action. 

2. An official visitor shall (a) acquaint herself with the work in the field 
or fields visited; (b) make a report and recommendations. She may be charged 
with some special duty, such as (a) acting as delegate to an assembly or 
(b) making a special investigation. In her social contacts she shall be recog- 
nized as an official representative of the Soceity. While she is at liberty to 
express her own views and judgments, she shall make it clear to those on 
the field that she cannot speak with final authority on matters requiring action 
by the Foreign Department or the Society. 

XVIII — Publication Department 

1. The periodicals of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society shall be 
known as the Woman's Missionary Friend, Junior Missionary Friend and Der 
Frauen Missions Freund. 

2. The literature of the Society shall include all other publications not 
specified in Section 1. 

3. The editors and publisher of the periodicals and literature shall be 
elected annually at the meeting of the General Executive Committee, when 
their reports shall be received, and a copy thereof submitted for publication in 
the annual report of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

4. The editors and publisher shall be entitled to floor privileges on matters 
concerning their work. 

* The term major positions shall be interpreted to include those of conference evangelist 
Staff members for high schools and hospitals, and the like. 



198 By-Laws 

5. In the interim of the General Executive Committee the management 
of the Society's publications shall be under the control of the Home Depart- 
ment. 

6. Sample copies of all publications issued by the Society shall be sent 
to the general officers and to the members of the Home Department of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and to such other officers and ex- 
changes as may be deemed essential to the progress of this department. 

XIX — Zenana Paper 

1. The Foreign Department shall make appropriations from the income 
of the endowment of the Zenana Paper and shall have general supervision of 
the interests of the paper. 

2. The woman's conference in India shall nominate a committee con- 
sisting of five persons — three women and two men — one of whom shall be the 
publisher, to supervise the interests of the paper, and arrange with the press- 
committee for editing and publishing the Zenana Paper in the various lan- 
guages and dialects required, these nominations to be subject to the approval 
of the Foreign Department of the General Executive Committee. 

3. The editor-in-chief shall send an annual report of the Zenana Paper 
to the chairman of the Foreign Department with the amount of circulation 
and items of interest, in time to be presented to the annual meeting of the 
General Executive Committee in America. 

4. A report of the Zenana Paper shall be published in the annual report 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

5. The treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society shall be 
the treasurer of the Zenana Paper funds, and shall disburse the income of the 
same only upon the order of the chairman of the Foreign Department. 

XX — Funds 

1. All money raised under the auspices of this Society belongs to the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
shall not be diverted to other causes. 

2. xA reserve fund of $5,000 shall be retained in the treasury of the Society's 
publications and shall not be used except for an emergency in the business of 
the publication office and with the approval of the general officers and 
publisher. 

.3. Gifts, bequests, donations and other moneys received from donors 
residing outside the United States shall be paid to the general treasurer and 
credited as "received from the Society at large," except where such gifts come 
from foreign conferences regularly affiliated with Branches, in which case they 
shall be paid to the treasurer of the Branch concerned. 

4. Balances accruing fiom exchange, surplus from remittances made under 
appropriation and other sources, shall lieiong to the Branch supporting the 
work, and shall be reported January first and July first of each year, and held 
subject to the order of the corresponding secretary in whose Branch they accrue. 

5. No college or other endowment funds shall be held or invested on the 
foreign field. College endowments shall be held by the general treasurer and 
invested under the direction of the committee on investments. 

6. A fund for general home administration expense shall be created by 
annual appropriations paid by Branches into the treasury of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society. 

7. Gifts received on the life income plan shall be invested and reinvested 
during the lifetime of the donor by the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society under the instruction of the committee on investments, 
except such portions of said Life Income Gifts as shall be required to purchase 
from life insurance companies approved by the committee on investments, 
annuity policies to cover the life income payable to the donor. 



By-Laws 199 

Maximum life income gift rates on a single life shall be as follows: 

40 4.0% 50 5.0% 60 6.0% 70 7.0%, 

41 4.1% 51 5.1% 61 6.1% 71 7.1% 

42 4.2% 52 5.2% 62 6.2% 72 7.2% 

43 4.3% 53 5.3% 63 6.3% 73 7.3% 

44 4.4% 54 5.4% 64 6.4% 74 7.4% 

45 4.5% 55 5.5% 65 6.5% 75 7.5% 

46 4.6% 56 5.6% 66 6.6% 76 7.6% 

47 4.7% 57 5.7% 67 6.7% 77 7.7% 

48 4.8% 58 5.8% 68 6.8% 78 7.8% 

49 4.9% 59 5.9% 69 6.9% 79 7.9% 

For eighty and over the rate is 8%. 

The rate on two lives shall be that of the younger, or if there be more than 
two in a group, that of the youngest in the group. 

X XI — Retirement Fund and Pensions 

1. There shall be no legal obligation on the part of the Society to pay 
retirement allowance except to such missionaries as it shall, through its 
General Executive Committee on recommendation of the Foreign Depart- 
ment, designate, and only for the period and for the amount designated by 
the said General Executive Committee. 

2. Except as provided under (4) and (5), no missionary shall be eligible 
to retirement allowance who (a) was retired prior to January 1, 1900; (b) is, at 
the time of retirement, less than sixty-five years of age; (c) has served less 
than twenty-five years on the foreign field including furloughs to a maximum 
total of sixty months. 

3. The maximum retirement allowance for missionaries in the service 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society October 1, 1926, who were born 
in 1878 or earlier shall be $600 a year. Nothing in this section shall be con- 
strued as changing or increasing the allowance of any missionary on the 
retired list October 1, 1926. For missionaries born in 1879 or later the maxi- 
mum allowance shall be $480 a year. Regular missionaries of the Society 
who are indigenous to the field in which they work and who were in service 
January I, 1918, shall receive, if placed on the list of missionaries eligible to 
allowance, retirement allowance on the same basis as American and European 
missionaries, except in cases where they have been receiving a salary smaller 
than that paid to American and European missionaries. In such cases their 
allowance shall bear to $600 (if they were born in 1878 or earlier) or to $480 
(if they were born in 1879 or later), the same ratio as the salary they have 
received when in active service bears to the salary of the American and Euro- 
pean missionaries in their respective conferences. 

4. If a missionary at the time of necessary retirement has not reached 
the age of sixty-five years, or has not served twenty-five years, or has neither 
qualification, the Foreign Department may, by a three-fourths vote, recom- 
mend to the General Executive Committee an allowance according to the 
followina; scale: 



200 



By-Laws 



(a) For missionaries born prior to Jan. 1, 1879: 



Age at Re- 
tirement 



Amount of Allowance After Service 





25 yrs. 


24 yrs. 


23 yrs. 


22 yrs. 


21 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


55 


$390 


$374 


$359 


$343 


$328 


$312 


56 


407 


391 


374 


358 


342 


326 


57 


422 


405 


388 


371 


354 


338 


58 


439 


421 


404 


386 


369 


351 


59 


460 


442 


423 


405 


386 


368 


60 


480 


461 


442 


422 


403 


384 


61 


497 


477 


457 


437 


417 


398 


62 


520 


499 


478 


458 


437 


416 


63 


546 


524 


502 


480 


459 


437 


64 


574 


551 


528 


506 


483 


460 


65 


600 


576 


552 


528 


504 


480 



(b) For missionaries born after Jan. 1, 1879: 



Age at Re- 
tirement 



Amount of Allowance after Service 





25 yrs. 


24 yrs. 


23 yrs. 


22 yrs. 


21 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


55 


$312 


$300 


$287 


$275 


$262 


$250 


56 


326 


313 


300 


>87 


274 


261 


57 


338 


324 


311 


297 


284 


270 


58 


351 


337 


323 


309 


295 


281 


59 


368 


353 


339 


324 


309 


295 


60 


384 


369 


353 


338 


323 


307 


61 


398 


382 


366 


350 


334 


319 


62 


416 


399 


383 


366 


349 


333 


63 


437 


420 


402 


385 


367 


350 


64 


460 


442 


423 


405 


386 


368 


65 


480 


461 


442 


422 


403 


384 



When missionaries have not reached the age of fifty-five and have not 
served twenty years, the Foreign Department may recommend for each case, 
according to its merits, the allowance to be paid. 

5. In exceptional cases where the necessities of the individual require a 
larger allowance than is provided for under (3) and (4) the Foreign Depart- 
ment is empowered to recommend to the General Executive Committee by a 
three-fourths vote such allowance for her as in the judgment of the Depart- 
ment shall seem equitable. 

6. (a) In case a missionary of the Board of Foreign Missions becomes a 
missionary of the Society, her retirement allowance from the Society shall be 
based on her years of service as a missionary of the Society; and if transfer 
is made during her first term on the field, the time spent in language school 
shall be counted as a part of her years of service with the Society. 

(b) In case a missionary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
marries a missionary of the Board of Foreign Missions after a minimum service 
of ten years with the said Society, and, after marriage continues in the active 
service of the Board of Foreign Missions until she shall have attained the age 
of sixty-five years, and shall have served at least twenty-five years on the field, 
(including furloughs to a maximum total of sixty months) her retirement al- 
lowance as and when a widow, from the Society, shall be based on the years 



By-Laws 201 

of service as a missionary of the Society, and shall bear such proportion to the 
allowance which would have been paid her had she continued in the service of 
the Society as her actual years of service with the Society bear to twenty-five.* 
(c) If a contract teacher having served with the Society, or if a member 
of the faculty of a union college under appointment by the union college 
committee or a missionary in the Lee Memorial Mission, Calcutta, becomes 
a missionary of the Society, her years of service as a contract teacher or as an 
appointee of the union college committee or as a missionary in the Lee 
Memorial Mission, Calcutta, shall be counted in calculating her retirement 
allowance. 

7. No retirement allowances or special grants to retired missionaries shall 
be paid by Branches. 

8. Retirement allowances shall begin two years after the missionary's 
active service on the field ends. 

9. There shall be a Retirement Fund for care of retired missionaries con- 
sisting of gifts solicited for this purpose throughout the Society. Such gifts 
as are definitely designated for endowment shah he invested and reinvested 
by the treasurer of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society under the in- 
struction of the committee on investments, the principal being preserved 
intact and the income only being used to pay retirement allowances or to 
purchase pensions from insurance companies, approved by the committee on 
investments. Such gifts as are not definitely designated for endowment may 
be used for purchases of pensions from insurance companies, approved by the 
committee on investments, or for such other purposes involved in the retire- 
ment care of missionaries as by action of the General Executive Committee 
shall be authorized from time to time. 

10. There shall be inaugurated on January 1, 1927, a plan of purchasing 
pensions from life insurance companies for missionaries sent out after October 
1, 1926, and on January 1, 1929, for purchase of pensions for missionaries 
who are at that date in active service for the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society, who were born in 1879 or later years and who were sent out prior to 
October 1, 1926, such pensions not to exceed $480 a year and to be purchased 
in such amounts as shall be necessary to supplement the income from the 
Retirement Fund Endowment. The life insurance companies from which 
such pensions may be purchased shall be approved by the committee on 
investments. 

11. In case in any year the income from the Retirement Fund Endow- 
ment plus the proceeds of pension purchases shall not be sufficient to pay to 
retired missionaries the allowances above provided, the deficiency shall be 
supplied by a pro-rata assessment on the Branches; in case in any year the 
income from all sources shall exceed the total of allowances to be paid, the 
surplus shall be retained in income account and carried forward to succeeding 
years. 

12. Gifts for endowment, as distinguished from those for pension pur- 
chases, shall be added to the principal of the Retirement Fund and only the 
income from them used. 

XXII — Expenses 
1. From the General Home Administration Fund shall be paid: 
(a) Expenses of the general officers and special secretaries of the Woman 's 
Foreign Missionary Society; (b) traveling expenses to and from the meeting 
of the General Executive Committee incurred by the officers of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society, corresponding secretaries, secretaries of the 
home base, special secretaries, secretary of German work, recording secretaries 

*It is understood that a former missionary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
who is the widow of a man who had been retired for disability before the regular age of retire- 
ment, shall be considered a special case, and the adjustment of an allowance for her shall be 
made by the Society and the Board under their respective rulings for special cases among 
retired missionaries. 



202 By-Laws 

of the Home and Foreign Departments, secretary of the general office, mission- 
aries and two delegates from each Branch; (c) traveling expenses of the 
general officers, members and recording secretaries of the Home and the Foreign 
Departments to and from the mid-year meeting; (d) expense of the general 
office; (e) cost of literature supplied for meetings held outside of this country; 
(f) and such other expenses of home and foreign administration as the General 
Executive Committee shall from time to time direct. 

2. From the receipts of the publisher's office shall be paid: 
(a) Salaries of the editors and publisher and their assistants; (b) office 
expenses of editors and publisher; (c) travel expenses of editors and publisher 
to and from the meeting of the General Executive Committee; (d) travel 
expense of the publisher and editor of the Woman's Missionary Friend to the 
mid-year meeting. 

XXI 1 1 — Committees 

1. On Nominations 

There shall be a committee on nominations composed of two members 
from the Foreign Department and two members from the Home Department, 
these to constitute a standing committee and, when the General Executive 
Committee convenes, three delegates shall be added to serve during the 
session. Members from the Foreign and Home Departments shall be nominated 
by their respective Departments and shall serve two years each, one new 
member from each Department being chosen annually. The three delegates 
shall be nominated by the delegates' conference as soon as possible after the 
General Executive Committee convenes. It shall be the duty of this committee 
to present nominations for the officers for the Woman's F^oreign Missionary 
Society, the general counselor, auditor of the accounts of the general treasurer, 
and standing committees on by-laws, consultation with the Board of Foreign 
Missions, general office, investments, state of the Society, and such other 
standing committees as the General Executive Committee shall from time to 
time determine. 

2. On Memorials 

There shall be a committee on memorials consisting of one member from 
the Home Department, one member from the Foreign Department and three 
delegates. 

3. On Investments 

There shall be a committee on investments, to consist of the general 
officers, the general counselor, ex-officio, and co-opted members as need shall 
arise. The treasurer shall invest all trust, annuity and endowment funds of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society under the direction of this committee. 
Any Branch which so desires may turn over its Branch trust, life income gift 
and endowment funds to the control of this committee on investments. At 
the death of the donor of the life income gift or at the termination of the trust, 
the principal remaining to the credit of the original trust or life income gift 
shall be paid to the Branch treasurer by the general treasurer for the use of 
the Branch. When a life income gift lapses and before the net proceeds are 
paid to the Branch from which the donor came, ten percent shall be deducted 
and retained' for investment and reinvestment as an additional reserve to 
protect life income gift agreements. Branches which prefer to retain control 
of their invested funds may do so, but shall submit to the committee on 
investments above created an annual statement of their invested fluids and 
of the securities held therefor. The committee on investments shall present 
from time to time to each such Branch a list of investments suited to the 
particular Branch, this list to be suggestive only and the Branch to be as 
free as at present in the matter of making investments if it so desires. 

4. Resolutions 

There shall be a committee on resolutions consisting of the recording 
secretary and two delegates. 



By-Laws 203 

XXIV — Order of Business 

The following items of business shall be considered at the General Execu- 
tive Committee meeting: 

Calling the roll. 

Minutes. 

Appointment of committees. 

Reception of memorials, petitions and proposed changes in the consti- 
tution. 

Reports of the secretaries of the home base. 

Reports of special secretaries. 

Report of the Home Department. 

Reports of the corresponding secretaries. 

Report of the Foreign Department. 

Reports of oflicial correspondents. 

Reports of editors and publisher. 

Fixing place of next meeting. 

Election of president, vice-presidents, recording secretary, treasurer, 
special secretaries and other officers. 

Election of editors and publisher. 

Notice of constitutional amendments. 

Reports of committees. 

Miscellaneous business. 

Introductions. 

All resolutions to be discussed shall be presented in writing. No member 
shall be granted leave of absence except by vote of the entire body. 

XXV— Fiscal Year 
The fiscal year of the Society shall begin October first. 

XXVI — Meetings 

1. The General Executive Committee shall convene annually not later 
than the last week in October, at such place as the said Committee shall elect. 

2. The program for the meeting of the General Executive Committee 
shall be arranged by a committee composed of the president of the Society 
as chairman, the corresponding secretary, secretary of the home base, and the 
president of the Branch within whose bounds said meeting is to take place. 

3. Local arrangements for the entertainment of the General Executive 
Committee shall be in the hands of committees appointed by the Branch 
within whose bounds the meeting is to be held. 

4. The members of the Foreign Department and of the Home Department 
shall a.ssemble not less than three days before the opening of the General 
Executive Committee meeting. 

5. The Foreign Department and the Home Department shall hold a mid- 
year meeting at a time and place agreed upon by themselves. 

6. A majority of the members of the General Executive Committee shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

XXVII— By-Laws 

These by-laws may be changed or amended at any meeting of the General 
Executive Committee by a two-thirds vote of the members present and 
voting. 

CONSTITUTION FOR DISTRICT ASSOCIATIONS 

ARTICLE I— N.\ME 
This association shall be called The District Asso- 
ciation of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society in the 

Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



204 By-Laws 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 
The purpose of this association shall be to unite the auxiliaries of the 
district in an earnest effort for the promotion of the work of the Woman's 
F"oreign Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE III— Membership 

All members of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society in 

District shall be considered members of this association. 

ARTICLE IV— Officers 
The officers of this association shall be a president, three or more vice- 
presidents, a corresponding secretary, a recording secretary, a treasurer, a 
counselor for the young people's department, a superintendent of the junior 
department, a superintendent of literature, and such other officers as the dis- 
trict shall determine, in harmony with the constitution of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society. These officers shall constitute the executive committee to 
administer the affairs of the district. 

ARTICLE V— Meetings 
There shall be an annual meeting of the district association, when re- 
ports shall be received from all auxiliaries in the district, missionary intelli- 
gence shall be given, and necessary business transacted. 

ARTICLE VI — Change of Constitution 
This constitution may be changed at any annual meeting of the General 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society by a three- 
fourths vote of those present and voting, notice of the proposed change hav- 
ing been given to each Branch by its secretary of the home base before April 
first of that year. 

CONSTITUTION FOR AUXILIARY SOCIETIES 

Auxiliaries are expected to labor in harmony with and under the direc- 
tion of the Branch. 

ARTICLE I— Name 

This organization shall be called The Woman's Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety of , auxiliary to the 

Branch of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 

The purpose of this society shall be to aid its Branch in interesting 
Christian women in the evangelization of women in the foreign mission fields 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and in raising funds for this work. 

ARTICLE III— Membership 
Any person paying a regular subscription of two cents a week, or one 
dollar per year, may become a member of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society. Any person contributing five dollars per quarter for one year, or 
twenty dollars at one time, shall be constituted a life member. 

ARTICLE IV— Funds 

All funds raised under the auspices of this society, contributed or be- 
queathed to it, belong to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and shall 
not be diverted to other causes, but shall be paid into the Branch treasury. 

Remittances shall be forwarded quarterly to the conference treasurer. 

ARTICLE V — Officers and Elections 
The officers of this society shall be a president, one or more vice-presi- 
dents, a recording secretary, a corresponding secretary, a treasurer, a 
counselor for the young people's department and a supervisor of the junior 
department, who shall constitute an executive committee to administer its 
affairs. Managers and superintendents of departments of work may be 



By-Laws 205 

added as needed. These officers shall be elected at the annual meeting of the 
society. 

ARTICLE VI — Change of Constitution 
This constitution may be changed at any annual meeting of the Gen- 
eral Executive Committee of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society by a 
three-fourths vote of those present and voting, notice of the proposed change 
having been given to each Branch by its secretary of the home base before 
April first of that year. 

CONSTITUTION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES 

ARTICLE I— Name 
This organization shall be called The Young Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society, or The Standard Bearer Society of The Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society of the Church, 

Auxiliary to the Branch of the Woman's 

Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 
The purpose of this organization is to interest young people in foreign 
missions and to support the work of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ARTICLE III— Membership 
Any person may become a member of the Young Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society by the payment of one dollar a year and a member of the 
Standard Bearer Society by the payment of sixty cents a year. The payment of 
fifteen dollars shall constitute life membership. 

ARTICLE IV— Badge 
The badge of this organization shall be the Church Pennant pin. Mem- 
bers paying one dollar per year may wear the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society badge, if preferred. 

ARTICLE V— Funds 
Funds raised under the auspices of this society belong to the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society, and shall not be diverted to other causes. Re- 
mittances shall be forwarded quarterly to the district or conference treasurer. 

ARTICLE VI — Officers and Elections 
The officers of this organization shall be a president, two or more vice- 
presidents, a recording secretary, a corresponding secretary, and a treasurer, 
who shall be elected at the annual meeting of the organization and constitute 
an executive committee to administer the affairs of the same. Superintend- 
ents of departments may be added as needed. 

ARTICLE VII — Change of Constitution 
This constitution may be changed at any annual meeting of the General 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society by a 
three-fourths vote of those present and voting, notice of the proposed change 
having been given at the previous annual meeting. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE WESLEYAN SERVICE GUILD 

ARTICLE I— Name 
The name of this organization shall be the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 
The purpose of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to interest business 
and professional women in a four-fold program for others as well as for them- 
selves: 

(1) Development of spiritual life. 

(2) Opportunities for world service. 

(3) Promotion of Christian citizenship and personal service. 

(4) Provision for social and recreational activities. 



206 By-Laws 

ARTICLE III— Organization 

Section 1. The Wesleyan Service Guild shall be auxiliary to the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and to the Woman's Home Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Sec. 2. There shall be a central committee composed of three members 
appointed annually by the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and three 
members appointed annually by the Woman's Home Missionary Society at 
their annual meetings; one of these members shall be the chairman of the Guild 
committee for her organization; and eight or more representatives of business 
and professional women shall be selected by the central committee at the 
annual meeting of the Wesleyan Service Guild and presented for approval 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary' Society and the Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society. The central committee shall have general supervision of the work 
of the Wesleyan Service Guild and shall promote its interests. 

Sec. 3. The officers of the central committee shall be a chairman, one 
or more vice-chairmen, a recording secretary, a corresponding secretary, and a 
treasurer, and such other officers as the development of the organization may 
require. 

Sec. 4. The central committee shall have four departments: the de- 
partment of spiritual service, the department of world service, the department 
of Christian citizenship and personal service, the department of social and 
recreational activities. There shall be a department chairman for each de- 
partment. 

Sec. 5. There shall be a secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild elected 
annually by vote of the General Executive Committee of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society and of the Board of Managers of the Woman's Home 
Missionary Society on nomination of the central committee. 

Se^.. 6. The secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall act as chairman 
of the central committee and shall report semi-annually, by July 10 and 
January 10, to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and to the Woman's 
Home Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE IV— Membership 

The Wesleyan Service Guild welcomes to its membership any business or 
professional woman who is in sympathy with the four-fold purpose of the 
Guild and who will co-operate in carrying out its program of education and 
activities. The annual dues are vS2.50. 

Men may become associate members upon payment of the annual dues. 

ARTICLE V— Funds 

Section 1. The fiscal year of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be from 
June first to June first. 

Sec. 2. The annual payment of $2.50 provides for: 

Membership dues in the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society $1.00 
Membership dues in the Woman's Home Missionary Society. 1.00 

Branch contingent fund (W. F. M. S.) 10 

Conference contingent fund (W. H. M. S.) 10 

District contingent fund (W. F. M. S.) 05 

District contingent fund (W. H. M. S.) 05 

Wesleyan Service Guild contingent fund, central committee . . .10 
Wesleyan Service Guild contingent fund, local unit 10 

Total $2.50 

which shall be disbursed as follows: 

$1.15 to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and 
$1.15 to the Woman's Home Missionary Society (to be sent through the 
regular channels of each Society), 



By-Laws 207 

10 cents to the treasurer of the central committee, 
10 cents to be retained in the treasury of the local unit. 
Sec. 3. In the matter of undesignated gifts, the funds of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild shall be divided on a basis of 50 per cent for work on the foreign 
field and 50 per cent for work in the home field, the funds to be credited and 
administered as follows: 

5C% credited to and administered by the Woman's Foreign Missionary 

Society. 
45% credited to and administered by the Woman's Home Missionary 
Society. 
5% credited to and administered by the local unit of the Wesleyan Ser- 
vice Guild for the department of Christian citizenship and personal 
service. 

ARTICLE VI— Meetings 

The annual meeting of the central committee shall be held in June or as 
soon after the close of the fiscal year as is practicable, and other meetings of 
the central committee shall be held at the call of the chairman or of five 
members of the central committee at such times as are necessary or desirable. 



ARTICLE VII— Amendments 

Amendments not affecting the fundamental meaning of the constitution 
may be made with the approval of the representatives of the two Missionary 
Societies on the central committee. All other amendments require the con- 
currence of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and the Woman's Home 
Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE VTII — Conference Organization 

Section 1. A Wesleyan Service Guild conference secretary, preferably 
a Guild or ex-Guild member, shall be nominated by the units in each conference 
where there are three or more units of the Wesleyan Service Guild and the 
nomination confirmed by the conference secretary and conference treasurer 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary .Society, and by the conference president 
and the conference secretary of the Woman's Home Missionarj' Society. 

Sec. 2. The conference Guild secretary shall promote the work of the 
Guild in her conference, receive reports from the units, assist in the organiza- 
tion of new units, and shall report semi-annually (December first and June 
first) to the central committee and to the conference corresponding secretaries 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and the Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society. She should familiarize herself with the work of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary .Society and of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
and attend, as far as possible, the district and conference meetings of these 
Societies, and when practicable, present the interest of the Guild at these 
meetings. 

Sec. 3. Where it is impracticable for the units of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild to meet and nominate a Guild conference secretary, the conference corre- 
sponding secretaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of the 
Woman's Home Missionary Society shall upon consultation with the units 
nominate a conference Guild secretary, preferably a Guild or ex-Guild member, 
whose appointment shall be approved by a majority of the Guilds within the 
conference, and who shall be assisted, whenever necessary, by the conference 
corresponding secretaries of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and 
of the Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



208 By-Laws 

ARTICLE IX— District Organization 
Section 1. A Wesleyan Service Guild district secretary, preferably a 
Guild or ex-Guild member, shall be nominated by the units in districts having 
three or more units of the Wesleyan Service Guild; or, in default of a meeting 
of the units she may be nominated by the district corresponding secretaries 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of the Woman's Home 
Missionary Society in consultation with the units within the district, and her 
election confirmed by a majority of the units. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the district Guild secretary to receive re- 
ports from the units, to send, semi-annually, a summarized Guild report 
to the conference Guild secretary where such an officer exists, otherwise, to the 
corresponding secretary of the central committee, to co-operate in the organiza- 
tion of new units, to familiarize herself with the work of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society and of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, when 
practicable to arrange for group or district conferences, and to attend the 
district meetings of these Societies, and to present a report of the units of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild to each Society. 



CONSTITUTION FOR LOCAL UNIT 

ARTICLE I 
The local organization shall be designated as a unit of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild and shall be subject to the provisions of its constitution. 

ARTICLE II 

The officers of a local unit shall be: a president, one or more vice-presi- 
dents, a recording secretary, a corresponding secretary, and a treasurer. They 
shall be elected at the annual meeting of the unit. 

ARTICLE III 
A local unit shall have four departments, each of which shall be under the 
supervision of a department chairman. 

ARTICLE IV 
The officers and department chairman shall constitute an executive 
committee. 

ARTICLE V 
The collection and disbursement of funds of the local unit shall be in 
accordance with Article IV and V of the Wesleyan Service Guild constitution. 

BY-LAWS FOR LOCAL UNIT 

ARTICLE I — Duties of Officers 

Section L The president shall have general supervision of the work of 
the unit, shall appoint the department chairmen, and shall preside at the 
meetings. 

Sec. 2. The vice-president shall in the absence of the president assume her 
duties. 

Sec. 3. The recording secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of 
each meeting and shall provide notices for the church bulletin and for the 
press. She shall also keep an accurate list of the members of the unit, in- 
cluding home and business address and telephone. 

Sec. 4. The corresponding secretary shall conduct all correspondence of 
the unit. This correspondence includes filling out and sending semi-annually 



By-Laws 209 

the Wesleyan Service Guild report blanks to the district secretaries of the 
V^^oman's Foreign Missionary Society and of the Woman's Home Missionary 
Society and to the district (or conference) secretary of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild where such an officer exists, or to the corresponding secretary of the 
central committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

These blanks must be so sent as to be in the hands of these officials by the 
first day of December and June. She shall notify the three above named 
secretaries of changes of officers in the unit. She shall retain a copy of each 
report as part of the permanent record of the local unit. 

Sec. 5. The treasurer shall have .-.harge of all money of the unit. She shall 
collect membership dues, and shall keep a book account of all money received 
and disbursed. 

All money received by her, except the central committee contingent fund 
and the five per cent allowed for the department of Christian citizenship and 
personal service of the local unit, and certain specified items of supplies, to- 
gether with the Wesleyan Service Guild treasurer's report blanks, must be 
sent so as to be in the hands of the district (or conference) treasurer of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and the Woman's Home Missionary 
Society by the first of each month. 

At the same time duplicate reports of each must be sent to the treasurer 
of the central committee. 

Wherever there is a district or conference Guild secretaiy, the treasurer 
of the local unit shall send a copy of her reports through these officers to the 
central committee. 

Sec. 6. The executive committee shall plan the work of the local unit, 
shall approve all askings for missionary projects, presenting these askings for 
adoption by the unit, and shall promote the interests of the unit in harmony 
with the constitution of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

ARTICLE H — Departments and Committees 

Section 1. The department of spiritual service shall provide for the 
devotional service at the meetings of the unit and shall endeavor by every 
means to promote the spiritual welfare of the members. 

Sec. 2. The department of world service shall provide for the educa- 
tional program of the unit in harmony with the program of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and of the W^o man's Home Missionary Society 
and in harmony with the recommendations of the central committee. 

Sec. 3. The department of Christian citizenship and personal service 
shall seek to align business and professional women with all forward non- 
partisan movements for civic, moral, industrial, and social betterment. 

Sec. 4. The department of social and recreational activities shall provide 
for the social hour at the meetings and for such other social and recreational 
activities as are deemed advisable. 

Sec. 5. The chairman of the four departments specified in the constitu- 
tion shall work in harmony with the chairman of these departments in the 
central committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Sec. 6. Standing committees may be appointed as desired, such as 
membership, wa^s and means, music, publicity, etc. 

ARTICLE HI 

Section 1 . There shall be at least nine monthly meetings during the year. 

Sec. 2. The annual meeting of the local unit shall be held in May at 
which time annual reports shall be given by officers and department chairmen, 
a nd officers shall be elected for the ensuing year. 

NOTE: (1) Reports of the Wesleyan Service Guild should not be confused 
with the reports of auxiliaries and young women's societies of the Woman's 



210 By-Laws 

Foreign Missionary Society and of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
but should be reported in a separate column for the Guild under the adult 
department of each vSociety. 

(2) For officers and department chairman of the central committee see 
current Guild Year Book. 

CONSTITUTION FOR KING'S HERALDS 

ARTICLE I— Name 

This organization shall be called the King's Heralds of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and be under the supervision of the auxiliary of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society in the said Church, if any exist; otherwise under 
the special supervision of the district secretary of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE II— Object 

The object of this organization shall be to promote missionary intelligence 
and interest among children and to aid in the work of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ARTICLE III— Membership 
Any child between the ages of six and fourteen may become a King's 
Herald by the payment of twenty-five cents a year, the older group from twelve 
to fourteen to be known as senior King's Heralds. The payment of ten dollars 
shall constitute a junior life membership. 

ARTICLE IV— Officers 
The oflScers of this organization shall be a superintendent, president, two 
vice-presidents, recording secretary, corresponding secretary, treasurer, and 
agent for the Jtmior Missionary Friend. 

ARTICLE V— Meetings 

Meetings of this organization shall be held on the 

of each month. The officers shall be elected semi-annually at the September 
and March meetings. 

ARTICLE VI— Badge 

The badge of this organization shall be a silver trumpet with "King's 
Heralds" in blue lettering. 

ARTICLE VII — Change of Constitution 
This constitution may be changed at any annual meeting of the General 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society by a 
three-fourths vote of those present and voting, notice of the proposed change 
having been given to each Branch by its secretary of the home base before 
April first of that year. 

PLAN OF WORK FOR LITTLE LIGHT BEARERS 

Children under six years of age may be enrolled as Little Light Bearers 
by the payment of twenty-five cents annually, receiving the enrollment card 
as a certificate of membership. 

The payment of ten dollars shall constitute a junior life membership. 
Directions 

The superintendent, elected by the woman's auxiliary, shall have charge 
of the work of the Little Light Bearers and plan for the collection of dues, 
remitting and reporting quarterly through the regular channels, arrange for 
the annual public meeting, keep an accurate record in the Little Light Bearers' 
.Record Book, and report regularly to the woman's auxiliary. 



Forms of Will, Devise and Life Income Gifts 211 

FORMS OF WILL, DEVISE AND LIFE INCOME GIFTS 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, incorporated under the laws of the State 
of New York, dollars, to be paid to the treas- 
urer of said Society, whose receipt shall be sufficient acquittance to my execu- 
tors therefor. 

FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

I hereby give and devise to the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, incorporated under the laws of the State of 
New York, (describe land, etc., intended to be given to the Society), and to 
its successors and assigns forever. 

Note. — -In each of the above forms, when it is desired to bequeath 
directly to a Branch, the name of the Branch to which the bequest or devise 
is made shall be inserted immediately before the words, "Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society," whenever such Branch is incorporated. The name of 
the State under the laws of which said Branch is incorporated shall be in- 
serted, instead of the words "New York." 

Incorporated Branches: New England, under the laws of Massachusetts; 
New York, under the laws of New York; Philadelphia, under the laws of 
Delaware; Baltimore, under the laws of Maryland; Cincinnati, under the laws 
of Ohio; Northwestern, under the laws of Illinois; Des Moines, under the laws 
of Iowa; Minneapolis, under the laws of Minnesota; Topeka under the laws of 
Kansas; Pacific, under the laws of California; Columbia River, under the laws 
of Oregon. 

FORM OF LIFE INCOME AGREEMENT 

(a) For the Society as such: 

Whereas, of has given, 

donated to, and paid into the treasury of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a body corporate (hereinafter 

called the Society), the sum of dollars; 

Now, therefore, the said Society, in consideration thereof, hereby agrees 

to pay to said during natural life the 

annual sum of dollars, payable in equal 

semi-annual installments from the date hereof; said payments to cease on the 

death of the said and the said sum of 

dollars, given and donated by him (or her) as aforesaid, is to be considered as 
an executed gift to the said Society, and to belong absolutely to the said 
Society, from the date hereof, and without any obligation or liability therefor 
on the part of the said Society. 

Witness, the corporate seal of the said Society, and the signatures of 

and , its president and 

treasurer, this day of , 19. . . . 

Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

By 

President. 



Treasurer, 
(b) For the Branches: 

Same phraseology as (a) except that the "said Branch" is substituted 
for "the said Society," and the name of the Branch is inserted before the 
name of the Society in the second line, and in the signature lines. 



212 Act of Incorporation 

LIFE INCOME GIFTS 

Where it is practical, instead of making a bequest it is far better to con- 
vert property into cash and place the same in the treasury of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society at once, on the life income gift plan. By so doing 
all possibility of litigation is avoided and a fair income is assured. The Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society does not spend money so contributed while the 
giver lives, but invests it in good securities in this country and in annuity 
policies with Life Insurance Companies. 

At a meeting of the Inter-Board Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, held in Chicago, Illinois, in May, 1918, the following uniform schedule 
of life income gift rates was recommended for adoption by all the Boards of the 
Church receiving gifts on the life income gift plan. 

(a) Rates on a single life: 

40 4.0% 50 5.0% 60 6.0% 70 7.0% 

41 4.1% 51 5.1% 61 6.1% 71 7.1% 

42 4.2% 52 5.2% 62 6.2% 72 7.2% 

43 4.3% 53 5.3% 63 6.3% 73 7.3% 

44 4.4% 54 5.4% 64 6.4% 74 7.4% 

45 4.5% 55 5.5% 65 6.5% 75 7.5% 

46 4.6% 56 5.6% 66 6.6% 76 7.6% 

47 4.7% 57 5.7% 67 6.7% 77 7.7% 

48 4.8% 58 5.8% 68 6.8% 78 7.8% 

49 4.9% 59 5.9% 69 6.9% 79 7.9% 

For eighty and over the rate is 8%. 

(b) Joint life income gift rates payable during the joint existence and to the 
survivor of the two lives; for these apply to Miss Florence Hooper, Treasurer, 
Maryland Life Bldg., Baltimore, Md., or to Branch treasurers. 

ACT OF INCORPORATION 

State of New York, "1 

City and County of New York, j 

We, the undersigr»ed, Caroline R. Wright, Anna A. Harris, Sarah K, 
Cornell and Harriet B. Skidmore, of the City of New York, and Susan A. 
Sayre, of the City of Brooklyn, being all citizens of the United States of 
America, and citizens of the State of New York, do hereby, pursuant to 
and in conformity with the Act of the Legislature of the State of New York 
passed on April 12, 1848, entitled "An Act for the Incorporation of Benevolent, 
Charitable and Missionary Societies," and the several acts of the said Legis- 
lature amendatory thereof, associate ourselves together and form a body politic 
and corporate, under the name and title of "The Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church," which we certify is the 
name or title by which said Society shall be known in law. And we do hereby 
further certify that the particular business and object of said Society is to 
engage and unite the efforts of Christian women in sending female mission- 
aries to women in foreign mission fields of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and in supporting them and native Christian teachers and Bible readers in 
those fields. 

That the number of managers to manage the business and affairs of said 
Society shall be seventeen, and that the names of such managers of said So- 
ciety of the first year of its existence are: Lucy A. Alderman, Sarah L. Keen, 
Ellen T. Cowen, Hannah M. W. Hill, Mary C. Nind, Elizabeth K. Stanley, 
Harriet M. Shattuck, Isabel Hart, Caroline R. Wright, Harriet B. Skidmore, 
Rachel L. Goodier, Annie R. Gracey, Harriet D. Fisher, Sarah K. Cornell, 
Anna A. Harris, Ordelia M. Hillman and Susan A. Sayre. 



Certificate of Incorporation 213 

That the place of business or principal office of said Society shall be in 
the City and County of New York, in the State of New York. 

Witness our hand and seal this 20th day of December, A.D., 1884. 

[Seal.] 

Caroline R. Wright 
Anna A. Harris 
Harriet B. Skidmore 
Susan A. S.wre 
Sarah K. Cornell 

State of New York, \ 

City and County of New York./ 

On the 20th day of December, 1884, before me personally came and 
appeared Caroline R. W' right, Anna A. Harris, Harriet B. Skidmore, and 
Sarah K. Cornell, to me known, and to me personally known to be the indi- 
viduals described in and who executed the foregoing certificate, and they 
severally duly acknowledged to me that they executed the same. 

[Notary's Seal.] Andrew Lemon, 

Notary Public (58), 
New York County. 
State of New York,] 

County of Kings, [ss. 
City of Brooklyn. J 

On the 22d day of December, A.D., 1884, before me came personally 
Susan A. Sayre, to me known and known to me to be one of the individuals 
described in and who executed the foregoing certificate, and duly acknowl- 
edged to me that she executed the same. 

[Notary's Seal.] F. G. Mintram, 

Notary Public for Kings County. 
State of New York,) 
County of Kings. 

I, Rodney Thursby, Clerk of the County of Kings and Clerk of the 
Supreme Court of the State of New York, in and for said county (said court 
being a Court of Records), do hereby certify that F. G. Mintram, whose 
name is subscribed to the Certificate of Proof, or acknowledgment of the 
annexed instrument, and thereon written, was, at the time of taking such 
proof or acknowledgment, a Notary Public of the State of New York, in 
and for said County of Kings, dwelling in said County, commissioned and 
sworn, and duly authorized to take the same. And, further, that I am well 
acquainted with the handwriting of said Notary, and verily believe the signa- 
ture to the said certificate is genuine, and that said instrument is executed 
and acknowledged according to the laws of the State of New York. 

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal 
of the said County and Court, this 24th day of December, 1884. 

[Seal.] Rodney Thursby, Clerk. 

CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION, DECEMBER 27, 1884 

I, the undersigned, one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the State 
of New York, for the First Judicial District, do hereby approve the within 
certificate, and do consent that the same be filed, pursuant to the provisions 
of an Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, entitled, "An Act for 
the Incorporation of Benevolent, Charitable, .Scientific and Missionary 
Societies," passed April 12, 1848, and the several acts extending and amend- 
ing said act. Dated New York, December 26, 1884. 

Abm. R. Lawrence, J. S. C. 



ss. 



214 Amended Act of Incorporation 

State of New York, 



City and County of New York 

I, James A. Flack, Clerk of the said City and County, and Clerk of the- 
Supreme Court of said State for said County, do certify that I have compared 
the preceding with the original Certificate of Incorporation of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on file in 
my ofiice, and that the same is a correct transcript therefrom, and of the whole 
of such original. Endorsed, filed and recorded, December 27, 1884, 1 hour, 
25 minutes. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and affixed 
my official seal, this 12th day of November, 1888. 

[Seal.] James A. Flack, Clerk. 

AMENDED ACT OF INCORPORATION 

CHAPTER 213 

An Act to Authorize the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church to Vest its Management in a General Executive 
Committee. 

Became a law April 12, 1906, with the approval of the Governor. 
Passed, three-fifths being present. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 

enact as follows: 

Section 1. The Board of Managers of the Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church is abolished. 

Sec. 2. The management and general administration of the affairs of 
the said Society shall be vested in a General Executive Committee, to con- 
sist of the president, recording secretary, general treasurer, secretary of 
German work, secretary of Scandinavian work, and the literature committee 
of said Society, together with the corresponding secretary and the two dele- 
gates from each co-ordinate Branch of said Society. 

Sec. 3. The president, recording secretary, general treasurer, secretaries 
of the German and Scandinavian work and the literature committee, now 
in office, shall be members of the General Executive Committee, which shall 
meet on the third Wednesday in April, in the year nineteen hundred and 
six; and, thereafter, such officers and literature committee shall be elected 
annually by the General Executive Committee. The corresponding secretary 
and two delegates of each co-ordinate Branch shall be elected annually by 
such Branch. 

Sec. 4. Meetings of the General Executive Committee shall be held 
annually or oftener, at such time and place as the General Executive Com- 
mittee shall appoint, and such place of meeting shall be either within or with- 
out the State of New York. 

Sec. 5. This act shall take effect immediately. 

State of New York, \ 

Office of the Secretary of State./ " 

I have compared the preceding with the original law on file in this office, 
and do hereby certify that the same is a correct transcript therefrom, and 
the whole of said original law. 

Given under my hand and the seal of office of the Secretary of State, at 
the City of Albany, this sixteenth day of April, in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and six. 

Horace G. Tennant, 

[Seal.] Second Deputy Secretary of State 



Rules for Payment of Expenses 215 

ACTION OF 1908 

CHAPTER 91 

An Act to Amend Chapter Two Hundred and Thirteen of the laws of nine- 
teen hundred and six, entitled, "An Act to Authorize the Woman's For- 
eign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church to Vest its 
Management in a General Executive Committee," relative to the mem- 
bership and election or appointment of such General Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Became a law April 6, 1908, with the approval of the Governor. 
Passed, three-fifths being present. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do 

enact as follows: 

Section 1. Sections two and three of chapter two hundred and thirteen 
of the laws of nineteen hundred and six, entitled, "An Act to Authorize the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church to 
Vest its Management in a General Executive Committee," are hereby amended 
to read, respectively, as follows: 

Sec. 2. The management and general administration of the affairs of 
the said Society shall be vested in a General Executive Committee to consist 
of the president, recording secretary, and treasurer of said Society, together 
with the corresponding secretary of each co-ordinate Branch of the said So- 
ciety; and one or more delegates to be chosen by such co-ordinate Branches; 
and such additional or different members as may be now or hereafter provided 
for by the constitution of the said Society. 

Sec. 3. The president, recording secretary, and treasurer of said 
Society shall be members of the General Executive Committee; and hereafter 
such officers shall be elected annually by the General Executive Committee. 
The corresponding secretary and one or more delegates of each co-ordinate 
Branch shall be elected annually by such Branch; and such other members of 
such General Executive Committee as shall hereafter be created by the con- 
stitution of said Society shall be elected or appointed in the manner which 
shall be prescribed by the said constitution. 

Sec. 4. This act shall take effect immediately. 

State of New York, 
Ofi&ce of the Secretary of State. 

I have compared the preceding with the original law on file in this office 
and do hereby certify that the same is a correct transcript therefrom., and of 
the whole of the said original law. 

John S. Whalen, 
Secretary of State. 



RULES FOR THE PAYMENT OF EXPENSES OF THE GENERAL 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING AND OF THE 

MID-YEAR MEETING 

General Executive 

Travel Expenses. The travel expenses to and from the meeting of the 
General Executive Committee shall be paid from the general treasury of the 
Society for — the general officers, the special secretaries, the recording secre- 
taries of the Home and Foreign Departments, the publisher, the editors of the 
"Friend," the "Junior Friend" and the "Executive Daily," the secretary of 
the general office, the chairman of the world citizenship committee, the Swedish 



216 Rules for Paymeyit of Expenses 

representative, the Branch corresponding and home base secretaries, two dele- 
gates from each Branch, and the missionaries for whom it is the first session 
after their return on furlough, providing they have served on the field a term 
of at least four years. 

Entertainment. Entertainment expenses during the meeting of the General 
Executive Committee shall be paid by the general treasury of the Society for — 
the general officers, the special secretaries, recording secretaries of Home and 
Foreign Departments, the editor of the "Executive Daily," the secretary of the 
general office and the chairman of the world citizenship committee. 

The respective Branches shall pay the entertainmnt expenses of the corre- 
sponding and home base secretaries, and the luncheons and dinners of delegates 
and special guests. 

The entertaining Branch shall furnish full entertainment for missionaries 
and the Swedish representative and lodging and breakfast for delegates and 
special guests. 

The publication office shall pay the entertainment expenses of the pub- 
lisher and the editors of the "Friend" and "Junior Friend." 

Participants In the Program. Travel expenses of those taking part on the 
program of the General Executive Committee shall be paid by the entertaining 
Branch, if not already provided for by other funds. Entertainment expenses 
shall be borne by the entertaining Branch unless otherwise provided for. 



Mid- Year 

Travel Expenses. Travel expenses to and from the Mid-Year Meeting 
shall be paid from the general treasury for — the general officers, the members 
of the Home and Foreign Departments, the publisher, the editors of the 
"Friend" and "Junior Friend" and the secretary of the general office. 

Entertainment Expenses. The entertainment expenses shall be paid from 
the general treasury for — the general officers, the special secretaries and the 
recording secretaries of the Home and Foreign Departments. 

The entertainment expenses of the Branch corresponding and home base 
secretaries shall be paid by their respective Branches. 

The entertainment of the publisher and editors of the "Friend" and "Junior 
Friend" shall be paid from the funds of the publication office and the enter- 
tainment expenses of the secretary of the general office from the funds of that 
office. 



Delegates and Special Guests 

Delegates are elected by each Branch according to its own procedure. 
The home base secretary should communicate with them informing them 
on the following points: (1) election; (2) information about place and time 
of meeting; (3) instruct them to notify hospitality committee of the time 
of their arrival; (4) general treasurer pays travel bills; (5) entertaining Branch 
provides entertainment on the Harvard Plan; other meals are left to their 
individual Branches. If they prefer hotel accommodations, they must secure 
them at their own expense. 

Delegates arrive the day before the public program begins. Meetings are 
provided for on page 186 of this Year Book. They are called together and 
organized by the recording secretary. 

Special guests come at the invitation of the General Executive Committee. 
They arrive two days before the public program. The home base secretary 
sends them the necessary information. 



Miscellany 217 

MISCELLANY 

POSTAGE TO FOREIGN LANDS 

Letters — To Mexico and to all countries and places in South and Central 
America, except Chile . . . the postage rate is the same as in the United 
States. To all other foreign countries the rate is for the first ounce, five cents, 
for each additional ounce three cents. 

Priyited Matter — ^In general to all foreign countries is one and one-half 
cents for each two ounces. 

Parcel Post — In general the rate is fourteen cents per pound. For further 
particulars consult your postmaster. 

FOREIGN MONEY 

India — A pice is one-fourth of an anna, or about two-thirds of a cent. 
An anna is worth one-sixteenth of a rupee. The rupee varies in value and is 
worth about i3 cents. 

Korea and Japan — A yen, whether in gold or silver, is one-half the value 
of the gold and silver dollar in the United States. There are one hundred 
sen in the yen. 

China — A cash is one mill. The tael is worth in gold about $1.15. The 
Mexican dollar is also used in China, but varies in value; it averages, however, 
about one-half the value of the United States gold or silver dollar. 

MEMBERSHIPS AND DUES 

The payment of one dollar annually constitutes membership in the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

The payment of one dollar annually constitutes membership in the 
Young Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

The payment of sixty cents annually constitutes membership in the 
Standard Bearer Society. 

There shall be contingent funds from district, conference and Branch 
for administration purposes. The amounts shall be decided by each Branch. 

The payment of twenty-five cents annually constitutes membership in 
King's Herald Bands. 

The payment of twenty-five cents annually constitutes membership in 
Little Light Bearer Circles. 

The payment of one dollar annually constitutes an extension member. 

The payment of one dollar annually constitutes an honorary member. 

The payment of three hundred dollars constitutes an honorary life patron. 

The payment of one hundred dollars constitutes an honorary life man- 
ager. 

The payment of fifty dollars constitutes a senior memorial member. 

The payment of thirty-five dollars constitutes a young people's memorial 
member. 

The payment of twenty-five dollars constitutes a junior memorial member. 

The payment of twenty dollars constitutes a life membership in the 
auxiliary. This membership is an honorary distinction and does not preclude 
the payment of annual dues. 

The payment of ten dollars constitutes a junior life membership. 

The payment of fifteen dollars constitutes a Standard Bearer life member- 
ship. 

The life memberships of Standard Bearers and juniors cover the annual 
dues to the age limits in each department. Dues may be paid by Standard 
Bearer and junior life members but it is not obligatory. 



218 Miscellany 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships in Africa are twenty-seven and one-half to thirty dollars. 

Scholarships in China are twenty to one hundred and fifty dollars. 

Scholarships in India vary from twenty-five to one hundred dollars. 

Scholarships in Malaya are thirty-five to fifty dollars. 

Scholarships in the Philippine Islands vary from twenty to sixty dollars. 

In Japan, Korea, North Africa, Mexico, South America and Europe 
the share plan obtains. Work in individual stations is classified and listed as- 
follows: educational, evangelistic, medical. Shares, except in France, are 
twenty dollars. In P'rance shares are one hundred dollars each. Patrons will 
be kept informed concerning shares through station letters, issued quarterly. 

ENDOWMENTS 

Any individual or Branch desiring to name a building may be given that 
privilege on payment of more than one-half of the cost of said building. 

A gift of $1,200 may endow a medical scholarship; a gift of $1,000 may 
endow a hospital bed. The difference between the income derived from this 
sum and the amount asked for the annual support of a bed is to provide a 
proportionate share of the upkeep and running expenses. 

A gift of $1,000 may furnish and name the operating room or a ward in 
a hospital. 

A gift of $1,000 may furnish and name a chapel or library within a school 
or other building. 

A gift of $500 may furnish and name a classroom, and a gift of $100 a 
smaller room in any building. 

Not less than $1,000 shall be required for endowment to cover an object 
costing $50 a year or less, larger items to be capitalized at 5%. We call at- 
tention to the by-laws requiring that all endowments shall be invested in the 
United States of America. 

RECEIPTS FOR 1934-1935 
From Branches 

New England $ 59,921.41 

New York 160,796.47 

Philadelphia 144,799.33 

Baltimore 37,602.50 

Cincinnati 177,908.04 

Northwestern 275,017.24 

Des Moines 90,372.11 

Minneapolis 48,040.41 

Topeka 148,441.18 

Pacific 90,771.60 

Columbia River 33,168.95 

Total from Branches $1,266,839.24 

From Other than Branch Sources 

Retirement Fund Principal and Income $ 46,313.26 

Zenana Paper Fund Income 999.22" 

Interest on various invested funds 5,647.43 

Miscellaneous gifts for buildings 14,929.55 

Women's Christian College of Korea 72,000.00 

Isabella Thoburn College 1,186.48 

Total Receipts $1,407,915.18- 



Statistics 



219 



SESSIONS OF THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Date 


Place 


President 


Secretary 


Receipts 


1870 


Boston, Mass 


Mrs. David Patten . . . 


Mrs. W. F. Warren.. 


$4,546.86 


1871 


Chicago, 111 


" Calvin Kingsley . 


" W.F.Warren.. 


22,397.99 


1872 


New York City . . . 


" D.W.Clark 


" W.F.Warren.. 


44,477.46 


1873 


Cincinnati, O 


" L. D. McCabe... 


" R. Meredith . . . 


54,834.87 


1874 


Philadelphia, Pa... 


" F. G. Hibbard... 


" J. H. Knowles. . 


64,309.25 


1875 


Baltimore, Md 


" F. A. Crook 


" R. R. Battee... 


61,492.19 


1876 


Washington, D.C.. 


'■ F. G. Hibbard... 


" W. F. Warren. . 


55,276.06 


1877 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


" Goodrich 


" Delia L. William 


5 72,464.30 


1878 


Boston, Mass 


" W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


68,063.52 


1879 


Chicago, 111 


" S.J.Steele 


" L. H. Daggett.. 


66,843.69 


1880 


Columbus, O 


" W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


76,276.43 


1881 


BuiTalo, N. Y 


" F. G. Hibbard... 


" Mary C. Nind. . 


107,932.54 


1882 


Philadelphia, Pa.. . 


" W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey... 


195,678.50 


1883 


Des Moines, la.. . . 


" L. G. Murphy. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


126,823.33 


1884 


Baltimore, Md 


" W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


143,199.14 


1885 


Evanston, 111 


" I. R. Hitt 


" F. P. Crandon. . 


157,442.66 


1886 


Providence, R. I. . . 


" W. F. Warren.. . 


" J. H. Knowles. . 


167,098.85 


1887 


Lincoln, Neb 


Miss P. L. EUiott 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


191,158.13 


1888 


Cincinnati, O 


Mrs. D. W. Clark 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


206,308.69 


1889 


Detroit, Mich 


" I. N. Danforth.. 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


226,496.15 


1890 


Wilkesbarre, Pa. . . . 


" W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


220,329.96 


1891 


Kansas City, Mo. . . 


" J. J. Imhoff 


" J. T. Gracey... 


263.660.69 


1892 


Springfield, Mass. . 


•' W.F.Warren... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


265,242.15 


1893 


St. Paul, Minn 


" W. Couch 


'• J. T. Gracey . . . 


277,303.79 


1894 


Washington, D. C. 


" A. H. Eaton. . .. 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


311,925.96 


1895 


St. Louis, Mo 


Miss E. Pearson 


" J. T. Gracey... 


289,227.00 


1896 


Rochester, N. Y 


Mrs. S. L. Baldwin. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


285,823.94 


1897 


Denver, Colo 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


313,937.86 


1898 


Indianapolis, Ind... 


" Cyrus D. Foss... 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


328,488.75 


1899 


Cleveland, O 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


360,338.63 


1900 


Worcester, Mass... 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


414,531.33 


1901 


Philadelphia, Pa.. . 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


426,795.28 


1902 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey . . . 


478.236.03 


1903 


Baltimore, Md. . . . 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. T. Gracey... 


491,391.75 


1904 


Kansas City, Mo. . . 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" J. H. Knowles. . 


534.040.17 


1905 


New York City . . . 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" C. S. Nutter .. . 


548.943.55 


1906 


Omaha, Neb 


" A. W. Patten.... 


" C. W. Barnes. . 


616,456.71 


1907 


Springfield, 111 


" Cyrus D. Foss... 


" C. W. Barnes. . 


692,490.07 


1908 


Cincinnati, O 


" Cyrus D. Foss. . . 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


673,400.04 


1909 


Pittsburgh. Pa 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


691,961.39 


1910 


Boston, Mass 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" C. W. Barnes. . 


743,990.31 


1911 


St. Louis, Mo 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


939,257.55 


1912 


Baltimore, Md. . . . 


" W.F. McDowell. 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


837,224.49 


1913 


Topeka, Kan 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


911,337.43 


1914 


Buffalo, N. Y 


" W.F. McDowell. 


" C W. Barnes . . 


♦1,096,228.85 


1915 


Los Angeles, Calif. . 


" W.F. McDowell. 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


931.780.67 


1916 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" C. W. Barnes . . 


1,033,770.65 


1917 


Detroit, Mich 


" W. F. McDoweH. 


" L. L. Townley . . 


1,175,758.90 


1918 


Cleveland, O 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" Charles Spaeth. 


1.343.930.03 


1919 


Boston, Mass 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" Charles Spaeth. 


2,006,370.66 


1920 


Philadelphia, Pa.. . 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" Charles Spaeth . 


2,000,631.12 


1921 


Wichita, Kan 


" W. F. McDowell . 


" Charles Spaeth. 


2,267,767.93 


1922 


Baltimore, Md. . . . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,255.740.88 


1923 


Des Moines, la. . . . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,303,225.98 


1924 


East Orange, N. J. . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,263,088.55 


1925 


Kansas City, Mo. . . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,405,461.08 


1926 


Peoria, 111 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,389,805.28 


1927 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,465,623.66 


1928 


Los Angeles, Calif.. 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Charles Spaeth. 


2,415,693.77 


1929 


Columbus, Ohio . . . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " Frank S. Wallace 


'. 12,795,199.54 


1930 


Springfield, Mass. . 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " H. E. Woolever. 


2,396,073.75 


1931 


Erie, Pa 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " H. E. Woolever. 


2,085,112.23 


1932 


Tulsa. Okla 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " H.E. Woolever. 


1,692,327.37 


1933 


Chicago, 111 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " H. E. Woolever. 


1,256.918.63 


1934 


Washington. D. C. 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


1 " H. E. Woolever. 


1,326.275.00 


1935 


St. Louis, Mo 


" Thomas Nicholsor 


" H. E. Woolever. 


1,407.915.18 




Total since organization 




$55,344,156.15 



* $163,795.00 Bequest and gifts of Mrs. Francesca Nast Gamble, 
t 8274,000.00 Bequest of Miss Emma E. Dickinson. 



INDEX 



Page 

Act of Incorporation 212 

Action of 1908 215 

Actions of the General Officers ... 96 
Actions of the General Executive 
Committee on Recommendation 
of 
Committee on Investments. ... 99 

Home Department 100 

Foreign Department 107 

International Department 100 

Unit Meeting 98 

Amended Act of Incorporation. . . . 214 

Appointments, Special 6 

Appropriations 

Summarized by Foreign Confer- 
ences (see note) 135 

Summary by Branches 136, 137 

{also Additional Pamphlet) 

Bequest, Form of 211 

Bequests and Lapsed Life Income 

Gifts 132 

Branch 

Assignment of Foreign Language 

Conferences 86 

Officers 81 

Statistics 138, 139 

Territory 88 

By-Laws 

Report of Committee on 95 

Certificate of Incorporation 2l3 

Colleges 

W. F. M. S 68 

Union 70 

Committees 

Foreign Department 8 

Home Department 8 

Special 5 

Standing 5 

Constitution and By-Laws 

Auxiliaries 204 

District Associations 203 

King's Heralds 210 

Little Light Bearers, Plan of 210 

Wesleyan Service Guild 205 

Woman's Foreign Missionary 

Society 179 

Young People's Societies 205 

Corresponding Secretaries 3 

Depots of Supplies . .Third Cover Page 

Directory of Missionaries 156 

Disbursements, Summary of 134 

Editors 4 

Endowments 218 

Executive Daily 

Editor of 5 



Page 
Extension Members, missionaries 

supported by 86 

Field Correspondents and Treas- 
urers 9 

Foreign Department 3 

Action of 107 

Committees 8 

Foreign Language Conferences. . . 86 

Foreign Money 217 

Forms of V/ill, Devise and Life 

Income Gifts 211 

Forward Movement Slogan and 

Plan 2 

Frauen Missions Freund 

Editor 4 

General Executive Committee 

Members of (1935) 4 

Minutes (Proceedings) 13 

Sessions of 219 

General Fund, Treasurer's Report 

of 123 

General Literature 

Editor of 4 

General Office 

Secretary of 5 

General Officers 3 

Actions of . . 96 

Home Base, At the 81 

The Quadrennium 89 

Statistics of 138,139 

Home Department 4 

Actions of 100- 

Committees 8 

In Lands Afar 19 

Africa 19 

Burma 21 

China 25 

Europe and North Africa 61 

India 37 

Japan 50 

Korea 55 

Latin America 64 

Malaya 57 

Philippine Islands 59- 

Sumatra 61 

In Memoriam 12 

International Department 

Actions of 100 

Committee 5 

Workers under Units 178 

Junior Department 

Secretary 4 

Missionaries Supported by 86 

Branch Superintendents. 85 



220 



Index 



221 



Junior Missionary Friend Page 

Editor 4 

Library Service 

Director of 5 

Branch Directors 85 

Life Income Agreement 211 

Life Income Gifts 212 

List of Real Estate {see 1929 Year Book) 
McDowell, Clotilda Lyon 

Fellows 79 

Memberships and Dues 217 

Miscellany 217 

Missionaries 

Alphabetical List of 156, 178 

And Their Stations 

Africa 19 

Burma 21 

China 23 

Europe and North Africa. ... 61 

India 34 

Japan 50 

Korea 54 

Latin America 64 

Malaya 57 

Philippine Islands 59 

Sumatra 61 

Colleges 

W. F. M. S 68 

Union 70 

Contract Workers 176 

Fellows in Service 79 

Summary of 178 

Supported by Young People, 
Juniors, Extension Members 86 

Officers 3 

Official Correspondents, Field Cor- 
respondents and Treasurers 

in Foreign Fields 9 

Payments on Land and Buildings 126 

Postage to Foreign Lands 217 

Proceedings 13 

Publication Office, Report of 130 

Publisher 5 

Quadrennivun Reports 

At the Home Base 89 

Financial History 92 

Real Estate,List of (see 1929 Year Book) 

Form of Devise 211 

Receipts for 1934-1935 218 

Since Organization 219 

Report of Committee on By-Laws 95 
Representatives on Boards and 

Committees 6 

Rules for Payment of Expenses 

Delegates and Special Guests.. . 216 

General Executive 215 

Mid- Year 216 



Page 

Scholarships 218 

Secretaries of the Home Base. ... 4 
Sessions of General Executive 

Committee 219 

Special Secretaries 4 

Statistics 

Educational Institutions. . . . 142-151 

Bible Training Schools 152 

Colleges 153 

Summarv by Fields 153 

Foreign Work. 136, 137 

Home Base 138, 139 

Medical 154, 155 

Summary of General Statistics 

by Conferences 140, 141 

Student Work 

Secretary 4 

Branch Secretaries 84 

Summary of 

Appropriations {see note) 135 

Disbursements 134 

Foreign Conferences (Gen.) 140,141 

Home Statistics 138, 139 

Missionaries 178 

Treasurer 3 

Reports of 123-129 

Auditor's Certificate 129 

General Fund 123 

International Department. . . 125 
Payments on Land and Build- 
ings 126 

Pension Purchases 128 

Real Estate (see 1929 Year Book) 
Retirement Fund Principal 

and Income 126 

Summary of Appropriations 

(see note) 135 

Summary of Disbursements . 134 

Union Colleges 125 

Zenana Paper Fund 126 

Union Colleges 70 

Wesleyan Service Guild 

Chairman of Central Committee 4 

Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society 

Colleges 68 

General Executive Committee.. 4 
Officers 3 

Woman's Missionary Friend 

Editor 4 

Young People's Department 

Secretary 4 

Missionaries Supported by 86 

Branch Superintendents 85 



Date Due 



._ L 

294.6 V.56 193475 

Methodist TT.pi scogal_chmxh. Womans 
Au-.r.— foreign missionary society. 

Year_book> Mtli,_Annual 



TiTi-E report, 1935. 



ii-i 11 « II tr 



V.56 



195475 



204.6 

M 

Methoc-ist Episcopal ch. Woman's for. misr 
' soc. Yearbook. 66th Annua.l 

report, 1935. 



Drew University Library 

Madison, New Jersey 

1. A fine of two cents a day will be charged on 
each book which is not returned by date 
stamped in book. No book will be issued to 
any person incurring such a fine until it has 
been paid. 

2. All injuries to books beyond reasonable wear 
and all losses shall be made good to the 
satisfaction of the Librarian. 

3. Each borrower is held responsible for all 
books charged to him and for all fines accru- 
ing on the same. 

L. B. 2 10-696S3-'41 



THE WOMAN'S FOREIGN 
MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

GENERAL OFFICE 

Room 710, 150 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
MISS RUTH RANSOM, Office Secretary 



PUBLICATION OFFICE 

581 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

MISS ANNIE G. BAILEY, Publisher 
Send all orders for Periodicals to the Publication Office 

Depots of Supplies 

New England Branch 

Miss Sigrid C. Bjorklund . . . Room 66, 581 Boylston St., 

Boston, Mass^ 

New York Branch 

Miss Ella West . . Room 715, 150 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Philadelphia Branch 

Mrs. Harry H. Campbell, Room 304, 1701 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baltimore Branch 

Mrs. Cora L. Moffit . . . . 903 St Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Cincinnati Branch 

Miss Geneva Hutchinson, Room 303, 420 Plum St., Cincinnati, O. 

Northwestern Branch 

Miss Marie Winterton ... 740 N. Rush St., Chicago, 111. 

Des Moines Branch 

Miss Minnie Callison . . 1306 E. Grand Ave., Des Moines, la. 

Minneapolis Branch 

Mrs. B. L. Bummert .... 607 Wesley Temple Bldg., 

MinneapoUs, Minn. 
Topeka Branch 

Miss Anna Simpson .... 502 Sharp Bldg., Lincoln, Neb. 

Pacific Branch 

Miss Anna McFarland 125 Marchessault St., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Columbia River Branch 

Miss Louise Godfrey, Room 303, Artisans Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

German Supplies 

Miss A. M. Achard . . . 1119 La Boice Drive, Glendale, Calif. 

Swedish Supplies 

Mrs. Charles Carlson . . . 1419 Balmoral St., Chicago, III. 



Affirmation of *Turpose^ 

BELIEVING Jesus Christ and his gospel to 
be the answer to the world's need, the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society re- 
affirms its purpose: To know him and to make 
him known; to aid in making possible the realiza- 
tion of his kingdom for all peoples and in all 
areas of life; to share with womanhood and child- 
hood through education, social uplift, healing 
ministries and evangelism the abundant life in 
Christ; to enlist and maintain trained women as 
missionaries; to assist in promotion of the mis- 
sionary spirit throughout our world parish; to 
seek with women of all lands fellowship and 
mutual help in the building of a 
Christian world order. 



.' V.i ■ft;;>l>^'.&^.J^